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News

Task force recommendations and near misses

The right to vote on setbacks and local control was traded for this task force. So what did we get?

By Elizabeth Miller

When Governor John Hickenlooper handpicked his task force to examine state and local regulations concerning oil and gas operations, his stated intent was to resolve those issues involving competing regulatory entities and multiple jurisdictions including state and local governments, surface and mineral owners, oil and gas operators and local community members concerned about the effects of drilling and fracking. The task force itself was crafted as a compromise to pull initiatives from last November’s ballot that would have allowed Colorado voters to weigh in on the rights of local communities to defend their environment and citizens, and on establishing a 2,000-foot setback from occupied buildings. In his executive order for the task force, the governor charged its members with addressing those issues, as well as drillingrelated concerns over noise, air quality and dust in a state valued as much by the people who choose to make Colorado their home as by the corporations invested in extracting the state’s oil and gas.

Boulderganic

Acid attack

Antarctic Ocean acidification is slowing the growth of an important food source for marine life

By Tim Radford

As the planet’s oceans become more acidic, the diatoms — a major group of alga — in the Antarctic Ocean could grow more slowly. And since tiny, single-celled algae are a primary food source for an entire ocean ecosystem, the discovery seems ominous. Bioscientist Clara Hoppe and colleagues from the Alfred Wegener Institute at the Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, report in the journal New Phytologist that they tested the growth of the Antarctic diatom Chaetoceros debilis under laboratory conditions.

Stew's Views

Ladies and gentlemen, not the Grateful Dead

By Stewart Sallo

It has been almost 20 years since legendary Grateful Dead lead guitarist Jerry Garcia transitioned to the big acid test in the sky. And since Jerry left us the debate has raged over whether the remaining members of the band — Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart — could call themselves the Grateful Dead. That question was answered definitively with a resounding “NO” this past weekend as some 500,000 fans logged on to the Ticketmaster website in an attempt to purchase tickets to the “Fare Thee Well” shows, scheduled for July 3-5 at Soldier Field in Chicago. You heard it here first: Even if these shows go down as the greatest in the history of rock and roll, this is not the Grateful Dead.

News

Selling points

Complaints of mobile park owners blocking sales and managing heavy-handedly surface... again

By Matt Cortina

Jerry Allen wants to sell his home. All he has to do is move it out of Boulder. Allen, 62, and his wife own a manufactured (or mobile) home in the Boulder mobile home park Vista Village. The Allens recently finished building their dream lodge in Estes Park and went to the Vista Village management office to tell them they were planning to sell their home.

Music

Balancing act

Lola Black juggles it all

By Kyle Eustice

Sometimes I forget I’m heavily tattooed,” singer Lola Black says. “Every now and then I’ll walk by a mirror and think, ‘Oh wow, that’s quite a bit.’ I don’t realize I have that many.” As lead vocalist of the Denver-based hard rock/metal band also named Lola Black, her presence can be intimidating. On stage, her black hair is piled high on top of her head while she belts out her lyrics in high heels and a black ensemble. The seemingly endless colorful tattoos make her appearance even louder. Simply put, Black commands attention.

NEWS
News

Boulder to Belize

A Nederland teacher helps students make a big difference in a small country

By Caitlin Rockett

In 1986, a 26-year-old woman from Colorado made her way to Los Angeles to march to Washington, D.C., to raise awareness about the mounting danger of nuclear proliferation — the Great Peace March took nine months, 3,700 miles and a lot of dedication. As one might imagine, the experience made an indelible impression on young Lori Graff (now Lori Kinczel), from the message she was spreading to the mental and physical endurance it took to get to Washington D.C. But the march was fated to do more than simply stir Kinczel’s political ideologies and try her fortitude — she made a friend that would, nearly 30 years later, help Kinczel show her students at Nederland Middle/Senior High School how they could make a big difference in the lives of children in the small Central American country of Belize.

 
 
BOULDERGANIC
Boulderganic

Acid attack

Antarctic Ocean acidification is slowing the growth of an important food source for marine life

By Tim Radford

As the planet’s oceans become more acidic, the diatoms — a major group of alga — in the Antarctic Ocean could grow more slowly. And since tiny, single-celled algae are a primary food source for an entire ocean ecosystem, the discovery seems ominous. Bioscientist Clara Hoppe and colleagues from the Alfred Wegener Institute at the Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany, report in the journal New Phytologist that they tested the growth of the Antarctic diatom Chaetoceros debilis under laboratory conditions.

 
 
ENTERTAINMENT
Arts

Too good to be true

Photographer fakes, rather than trying to make, the perfect family

By Amanda Moutinho

Suzanne Heintz is notorious for her family photos. She captures the everyday household chores, the family vacations and the holiday festivities. In the photos, Heintz is vibrant and lively, usually with a big smile. In contrast, her husband, Chauncey, seems a bit stiff and her daughter, Mary Margaret, has the same blank stare. That could possibly be because Chauncey and Mary Margaret are mannequins.

 
 
ADVENTURE
Adventure

A home out of doors

One mountain guide on how the mountains have become her country of origin

By Mary Reed

Norie Kizaki’s origin story is atypical for a Boulderbased skiing and rock climbing guide. She was raised in a rural Japanese Buddhist monastery — and if you’re picturing an idyllic gabled temple tucked in amongst rocks and gardens, Google “Nata-dera” and you won’t be disappointed.

 
 
CUISINE
Cuisine

Artifical colors: Not so sweet

Some in the food industry are pushing to completely eradicate coloring additives

By Ari LeVaux

Nestlé recently announced plans to remove all artificial colors and flavors from its candy bars. The company said it was doing so in response to consumer preferences, not because there was anything dangerous about the artificial products they were using.

 
 
Opinion
Stew's Views

Ladies and gentlemen, not the Grateful Dead

By Stewart Sallo

It has been almost 20 years since legendary Grateful Dead lead guitarist Jerry Garcia transitioned to the big acid test in the sky. And since Jerry left us the debate has raged over whether the remaining members of the band — Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart — could call themselves the Grateful Dead. That question was answered definitively with a resounding “NO” this past weekend as some 500,000 fans logged on to the Ticketmaster website in an attempt to purchase tickets to the “Fare Thee Well” shows, scheduled for July 3-5 at Soldier Field in Chicago. You heard it here first: Even if these shows go down as the greatest in the history of rock and roll, this is not the Grateful Dead.

 
 
BOB
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