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News

Insufficient data

Critics say Council voted before they had information necessary to evaluate rightsizing experiment

By Caitlin Rockett

Boulder’s first of three “rightsizing” pilot projects has rubbed many Boulder residents the wrong way — so wrong, in fact, that on July 28, City Council decided not to move forward with the next two pilot projects as soon as initially planned. The first project — reducing the number of car lanes and widening bike lanes on Folsom Street between Arapahoe Avenue and Valmont Road — has elicited significant public outcry. Many citizens claim City Council didn’t have adequate data to proceed with the project, which critics say has turned the corridor into a parking lot.

Adventure

Are you mentally tough?

By Scott Barry Kaufman

Forty seconds before round two, and I’m lying on my back trying to breathe. Pain all through me. Deep breath. Let it go. I won’t be able to lift my shoulder tomorrow, it won’t heal for over a year, but now it pulses, alive, and I feel the air vibrating around me, the stadium shaking with chants, in Mandarin, not for me.

News

Raise the gate?

City officials talk about pricing policies

By Angela K. Evans

Cowles wants the City Council to look at how city parking policies align with city goals, which include reducing traffic, carbon emissions and congestion, as well as generating revenue. He says he raises the issue because of long waiting lists for parking permits in city facilities and the price difference between public and private parking garages.

Music

Another color in the crayon box

Melissa Etheridge says music saved her life

By Amanda Moutinho

From coming out as a lesbian to her political activism to talking openly about her breast cancer diagnosis, Melissa Etheridge isn’t shy to tell the world about her personal problems. Honesty is the only way, she says. But she wasn’t always this way. Openness was her form of teenage rebellion, and she quickly found an outlet for her truth — music.

News

Creating space

New statewide initiative leads the country in developing affordable housing for artists

By Angela K. Evans

Until recently, Loveland artist Harrison Hand illegally lived in his rental office space. Another Loveland artist, Mary Waters, says she was “technically” homeless for the previous 10 months. But now both Hand and Waters live, and create, at the Artspace Loveland Arts Campus, an affordable live/ work housing project which opened to residents at the end of June.

NEWS
News

Reservoir slog

A plan to significantly rework, and potentially damage, the Cache La Poudre River moves forward

By Matt Cortina

The public comment session came about a month after the Corps released its Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Study (EIS), which was about 12 years in the making. It looked at a number of options for meeting water needs, including building multiple reservoirs and diverting major amounts of water from the Cache La Poudre River.

 
 
BOULDERGANIC
Boulderganic

Emissions threaten age of uncertainty for carbon dating

New study warns rising CO2 levels will undermine scientific dating of once-living things

By Tim Radford

Climate change driven by increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide will not just damage the health of the planet. A UK scientist now warns that it will also make life increasingly difficult for archaeologists, forensic scientists, art experts, fraud and forgery detectives and people who detect ivory poachers.

 
 
ENTERTAINMENT
Books

Water in the desert

The world’s largest literature festival heads to Boulder

By Amanda Moutinho

We have to bring it to Boulder.’” The festival Friedman was referring to is the ZEE Jaipur Literature Festival ( JLF). Founded in Jaipur, India in 2006, the festival has grown to be the largest literature festival in the world. And it’s heading to Boulder for its first American reincarnation Sept.

 
 
ADVENTURE
Adventure

Are you mentally tough?

By Scott Barry Kaufman

Forty seconds before round two, and I’m lying on my back trying to breathe. Pain all through me. Deep breath. Let it go. I won’t be able to lift my shoulder tomorrow, it won’t heal for over a year, but now it pulses, alive, and I feel the air vibrating around me, the stadium shaking with chants, in Mandarin, not for me.

 
 
CUISINE
Cuisine

The ‘it’ crop

Cauliflower is booming in Boulder County and beyond

By Noel Phillips

Growing up, outside of being the ugly, bad-tasting vegetable no one wanted on the veggie platter at parties — the one even ranch dressing couldn’t help — cauliflower was rarely seen at my house, but for one exception: fried cauliflower. In my current commitment to healthy, conscious eating and living, I cringe at the memory, but the smell of frying cauliflower remains a vivid part of my childhood. I can still hear the Fry Daddy bubbling and churning like a witches’ cauldron as my step-father dropped battered cauliflower florets into the waiting hot oil like tiny virgins being sacrificed to our appetites.

 
 
Opinion
Views

Israelis split on Iran deal

By Dave Anderson

Bill Clinton, when he was running for re-election as President in 1996, declared, “We remain the world’s indispensable nation to advance prosperity, peace and freedom and to keep our children safe from the dangers of terror and weapons of mass destruction.” His second-term secretary of state Madeleine Albright repeated the phrase “indispensable nation” so much that many people thought she originated the phrase.

 
 
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