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Home / Articles / News / News /  Amazon to Colorado associates: You’re fired!
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Monday, March 8,2010

Amazon to Colorado associates: You’re fired!

By Jefferson Dodge and Quibian Salazar-Moreno
On Monday morning Colorado-based Amazon Associates woke up to an e-mail informing them that they were fired. Amazon said thanks to Colorado House Bill 10-1193 signed by Gov. Bill Ritter last month, all of their Colorado-based associates accounts have been shut down. Amazon Associates partner with Amazon by placing ads and links on their websites that link back to Amazon.com. Associates get a percentage of the profit made from products sold to consumers who reached Amazon.com from the associate’s website.

According to Amazon, the bill imposes sales tax regulations on online retailers that are “burdensome.”

“The new regulations do not require online retailers to collect sales tax,” Amazon said in an email. “Instead, they are clearly intended to increase the compliance burden to a point where online retailers will be induced to ‘voluntarily’ collect Colorado sales tax — a course we won’t take.

“Regrettably, as a result of the new law, we have decided to stop advertising through Associates based in Colorado.”

One of the bill’s sponsors, Rep. Jack Pommer, D-Boulder, told Boulder Weekly that Amazon’s decision to fire its Colorado associates amounts to “spite” and vengefulness.

In explaining the intent of the bill, he says Amazon and other online retailers are not required to collect state sales tax with online purchases. That not only means lost revenue for the cash-strapped state budget, but it puts Amazon.com at a competitive advantage over Colorado retail establishments, because it allows the website to charge about 8 percent less for its products, Pommer says. That can put local retailers out of business, which then further decreases the sales tax collected by the state.

Amazon does collect state sales tax in the two states in which it has brick-and-mortar operations, since it is required to by law in states where it has an established presence, Pommer explains. But now more and more state lawmakers are introducing legislation requiring Amazon to begin collecting sales tax in their states as well, in some cases by defining its “associates” as an established presence that triggers a legal requirement to collect sales tax for the state.

New York, which enacted such a law in 2008, was unsuccessfully sued by Amazon, and after that 2009 court decision, Rhode Island and North Carolina followed in New York’s footsteps by passing similar legislation. Amazon then fired its associates in those two states.

“To me there is some sense of inevitability about this,” says Colorado Amazon Associate Dave Taylor. Taylor places Amazon.com ads on his blog, AskDaveTaylor.com, that link to a variety of DVDs, books and other items of interest to his readers. “What I hope is that we can get a constructive dialogue about this and it doesn’t end up being a ‘he said/she said’ and everyone gets mad and those of us in the middle get screwed. The worrying thing is what are the implications? Is this the harbinger of every company saying we don’t want to play with these things in Colorado? Or is it just Amazon being Amazon and everybody just says ‘whatever’?”


Pommer, who sponsored the bill with Sen. Rollie Heath, D-Boulder, says Amazon representatives objected to the bill. Initially, he says, an Amazon lobbyist claimed that the company didn’t have access to technology for collecting sales tax, which Pommer called “nonsense,” since many other online retailers do so. He points out that Amazon operates the retail website for Target, which collects state sales tax.

“I’ve learned that Amazon is not that honest when it comes to legislative issues,” Pommer says.

But he adds that he and his colleagues attempted to compromise. He says HB 1193, which was recently signed into law by Gov. Bill Ritter, originally contained language requiring online retailers like Amazon to collect state sales tax (using Colorado associates to establish that “presence”), but lawmakers removed that section, partly in an attempt to appease Amazon. Instead, the bill requires online retailers to notify its Colorado purchasers (and the state Department of Revenue) what they owe in state sales tax. The effect, Pommer says, is that the state would then bill purchasers for the sales tax they didn’t pay when using outfits like Amazon.com.

Pommer says he was shocked when he heard that Amazon had fired all of its Colorado associates, because the bill doesn’t even require the company to collect sales tax.

“It’s just spite; there’s no legal reason for it,” he told Boulder Weekly. “It’s the only retaliation they could come up with. I’ve never had a company blackmail the state legislature like this before.”

The fact that the company has reacted so strongly is telling, according to Pommer.

“I think what’s becoming clear is that they really rely on that price advantage,” he says. “Their business model is to undercut local retailers. I assume they are desperate to keep that price advantage.

“I didn’t realize how vengeful they were,” he adds. “They’re simply saying they’re angry at Colorado and they want to hurt Colorado. … It’s kind of shocking to think they would do this.”


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I'm not at all surprised that Amazon did this. Just the result of added taxes imposed by government. CUT spending instead and leave the internet and other businesses in Colorado alone. Hasn't anyone in government read "Atlas Shrugged"? If not they should.

 

That can put local retailers out of business, which then further decreases the sales tax collected by the state.quick loans no credit check

 

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This is a huge win for local small business. This levels the playing field. I have operated three businesses over the last 17 years that compete directly with online specialty retailers. I have often heard the comment from customers about how they do not have to pay taxes if they shop on line. Many of those customers salaries are also paid from state and local taxes. Why did it take so long for the legislature to realize the huge amounts of tax revenues lost to local governments from internet sales? I would guess no one had the political courage to address it. I congratulate the lawmakers who finally did. Representative Pommer is right on target when he says Amazon's reaction is telling as to how much they rely on this price advantage in their business model. It is unfortunate that the compromised bill adds a burden to the state to collect the tax. I as a business owner have to collect and submit sales tax. Amazon and other internet retailers should have to do the same. When the Republicans and others say this is bad for business, I wonder if they are only thinking of large businesses and their affiliates. This helps local small businesses, a great deal.!

 

Tim
It's not a win for small businesses who rely on Amazon's affiliate program for money. And it's a serious hit to small businesses in all other states, who may be forced to comply with onerous state-by-state requirements when selling products online. And it's complete rubbish that this is "vengeful" or out of "spite." If there are no Colorado associates, then there's no less justification for Colorado to be imposing any conditions or requirements on Amazon.com, which otherwise has no presence in the state.

 

Nice to be visiting your blog again, forex mini it has been months for me. Well this article that i’ve been waited for so long. I need this article to complete my assignment in the college, and it has same topic with your article. Thanks, great share

 

Boulder, told Boulder Weekly that Amazon’s decision to fire its Colorado associates amounts to “spite” and vengefulness.carding forum

 

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This is completely bonkers.  Our legislators have completely lost touch with reality.

This doesn't help local business at all, because it only hurts the people in colorado who were making money from Amazon, not those who were buying from Amazon.

Could we please get legislators that have a clue, perhaps some basic logic skills?

And if local retailers want to fight "big bad Amazon" they just need to give me a reason to go to a store.  This is capitalism, not day-care.  They don't have to meet Amazon's costs, but I have to get warm and fuzzies about going to the store, not annoying or uninformed sales people.  Try new business models and stop acting like dinosaurs.

 

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it really stinks for folks in the state that have businesses that deal solely online-

it used to be that having an affiliate link in your blog meant that if someone bought something directly related to the marketing effort you had done to promote that sale you were rewarded- with a small cut of the sale.

it wasn't much but when you are an independent author for example and you are out there promoting and marketing your book day after day and a person reading your blog then uses a link on your site to purchase your book you got a little extra on that sale. You got a little extra because you got THEM that sale.

When you are an independent author making only a small share of each sale if you lead people directly to that sale you earn a teensy bit more- it is a hurtful thing disproportionately for Indie Authors in Colorado.  

Yes, we like to protect small chains and local stores- especially local bookstores are a dying breed- however, much of that is because book stores and independent authors are like oil and vinegar- it is nearly impossible to get into any book store without the backing of a traditional publishing house- so many of these authors are selling online only- they aren't taking sales away from a local book store that won't stock them because they are "vanity press"

though also as a colorado resident I can understand the states wanting to collect taxes on eSales- its a lot of money that used to be collected locally- the states need to replace the tax revenue they are loosing, but how sending me a tax bill in the mail is going to be very effective- their enforecement and collection from the citizens rather than once from a corporation would cost most than they could hope to earn from it.

 

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Typical dems, obstructing small business

 

 
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