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Home / Articles / Entertainment / Reel To Reel /  reel to reel | Week of Nov. 3, 2011
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Thursday, November 3,2011

reel to reel | Week of Nov. 3, 2011

50/50

Though it’s a cancer film, the tender and funny 50/50 addresses its subject with a refreshing lack of melodrama. Based on the true story of Will Reiser, a comedy writer, the movie follows Adam (Joseph Gordon- Levitt), who gets diagnosed with the C-word. Rated R. At Century. — Michael Phillips/TMS

Airplane!

This now legendary comedy hit sends up the conventions and cliches of airplane-indistress disaster flicks. At Esquire. — Landmark Theatres

Anonymous

In Elizabethan England, intrigue swirls around Edward de Vere, the Earl of Oxford, who in this film is the true author of Shakespeare’s oeuvre.Rated PG-13. At Century. — Los Angeles Times/ MCT

Blackthorn

It’s been said (but not substantiated) that Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid were killed in a standoff with the Bolivian military in 1908. In the Western Blackthorn, Cassidy (Sam Shepard) survived and is quietly living out his years under the name James Blackthorn in a secluded Bolivian village. At Esquire. — Landmark Theatres

Bolshoi Re-opening Gala

The re-opening gala features opera greats Placido Domingo, Natalie Dessay, Dimitri Hvorostovsky and the principal dancers and soloists of the Bolshoi Ballet, including Natalia Osipova. At Boedecker Theater. — Boedecker Theater

Buck

Buck Brannaman, a true American cowboy, possesses near magical abilities as he dramatically transforms horses — and people — with his understanding, compassion and respect. At Boedecker Theater. — Boedecker Theater

Connected

Connected explores the visible and invisible connections linking major issues of our time — the environment, consumption, population growth, technology, human rights, the global economy. At Chez Artiste. — Landmark Theatres

Dolphin Tale

This heartwarmer based on a true story follows the tailless dolphin Winter (played by Winter) through all sorts of adversity alongside its human protectors. Rated PG. At Colony Square and Twin Peaks. — Michael Phillips/TMS

The Fairy

A night shift clerk in a small hotel near the industrial sea port of Le Havre meets a mysterious woman who arrives with no luggage and no shoes. Her name is Fiona, and she tells Dom that she is a fairy that can grant him three wishes. Fiona makes two of his wishes come true, then mysteriously disappears. Dom, who has fallen in love with her by then, searches for her everywhere. Influenced by Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Jacques Tati, The Fairy uses stylistic art direction to provide a punch line to each gag and a colorful retro feel. At International Film Series. — IFS

Footloose

This remake of this ’80s classic misses a few steps, most notably when it comes to the dancing. While director Craig Brewer (Hustle & Flow) adds weight, the leads simply don’t pop onscreen. Rated PG-13. At Century, Colony Square and Twin Peaks. — Los Angeles Times/MCT

The Guard

An unorthodox Irish policeman with a confrontational personality is teamed up with an uptight FBI agent to investigate an inter national drug-smuggling ring. At Boedecker and Esquire. — Boedecker Theater

The Ides of March

In the hectic days before a tight Ohio presidential primary, an up-and-coming campaign press secretary becomes embroiled in a political scandal that threatens his candidate’s shot at the presidency. Rated R. At Century and Colony Square. — Los Angeles Times/MCT

In Time

In a future where time is the universal currency and the wealthy live forever, a poor young man stumbles into a fortune but is falsely accused of murder and tries to bring down the system. Rated PG-13. At Century, Colony Square and Twin Peaks. — Los Angeles Times/MCT

Johnny English Reborn

Atkinson returns as the bumbling British secret agent introduced in 2003’s Johnny English. Rated PG. At Century and Twin Peaks. — Rene Rodriguez/MCT

The Lion King

A 3-D version of the classic animated film about a young lion cub who must overcome his devious uncle to lead their kingdom. Rated G. At Colony Square. — Los Angeles Times/MCT

Machine Gun Preacher

The inspirational true story of Sam Childers, a former drug-dealing criminal who finds an unexpected calling as the savior of hundreds of kidnapped and orphaned children. At Mayan. — Landmark Theatres

Mia and the Migoo

Created from an astounding 500,000 handpainted frames of animation. After a troubling dream, Mia sets off on a dangerous journey to find her father, aided by fantastical forest creatures. At Boedecker Theater.

— Boedecker Theater

Midnight in Paris

Midnight in Paris, a new romantic comedy from writer/director Woody Allen, tells the story of a family that travels to the picturesque French capital on business. The party includes two young people (Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams) who are engaged to be married in the fall and have experiences there that change their lives forever. Rated PG-13. At Mayan. — Landmark Theatres

Moneyball

Director Bennett Miller’s Moneyball is based on the true story of Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane, played remarkably by Brad Pitt. Somewhat of a renegade, Beane bucked the norm and employed a new statistical way of analyzing players. Rated PG-13. At Century and Colony Square. — Michael Phillips/TMS

My Afternoons with Margueritte

In a small French town, Germain (Gérard Depardieu), a nearly illiterate man in his 50s, takes a walk to the park one day and happens to sit beside Margueritte (Gisèle Casadesus), a little old lady who is reading excerpts from her novel aloud. At Esquire. — Landmark Theatres

National Theatre Live: The Kitchen This live theatre production broadcast from London’s National Theatre takes a look into the high-pressure kitchen of an enormous restaurant in London’s West End. At Century.

The Names of Love A young, extroverted liberal lives by the old hippie slogan “Make love, not war” to convert right-wing men to her left-wing political causes by sleeping with them. At Chez Artiste. — Landmark Theatres

Over Your Cities Grass Will Grow The film bears witness to German artist Anselm Kiefer’s alchemical creative pro

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