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Thursday, December 24,2009

Third-generation chocolatier: Go soft on the fudge

By Kathy Van Mullekom

Maryann Boho’s mother, Evelyn Dixon, started The Williamsburg Chocolatier in 1985.

Evelyn learned the art of making candy from her own mother, Mary Conner.

“My mother taught me what she knew about chocolate and candy-making, so many people do refer to me as a third-generation chocolatier,” says Boho, who lives in New Kent County, near Williamsburg, Va.

“In January, we celebrate our 25th year, which my mother would have been proud to see.”

All sales are now online, which Boho says is a blessing.

“Our business has continued to grow as a result,” she says. Her company does chocolates for gift-giving and special occasions, and makes chocolates for events and birthday parties.

“My mother always wanted to do a job that would make people happy, and after 25 years we still put smiles on faces,” Boho says. “If you are going to eat chocolate, know what you are eating and eat the best. The darker the chocolate, the better it is for you.”

Here, Boho shares a fudge recipe that she and her mother used for years. She prefers Veliche chocolate, which is a Belgian chocolate.

“The texture is smooth, like velvet, and it’s soft, which is the only kind of fudge I eat,” she says.

The recipe makes about three pounds, enough to create several boxes for your gift-giving needs. A second batch is sure to please your family.

BELGIAN CHOCOLATE WALNUT FUDGE

Butter (to grease pan) 3/4 lb. Veliche Belgian chocolate 58 percent or 72 percent (The higher the cocoa content, the richer the fudge.)

3 cups miniature marshmallows 3/4 cup chopped walnuts 2 cups sugar 2/3 cup evaporated milk 3 tablespoons butter Butter an 8 x 8 x 2-inch pan. Have chocolate, marshmallows and nuts ready.

Combine sugar, milk and butter in a heavy medium-size saucepan.

Bring to boiling and lower heat.

Gently simmer, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon to prevent scorching, about 6 minutes or to 227 degrees on a candy thermometer.

Remove from heat. Immediately stir in chocolate and marshmallows until melted. Quickly stir in walnuts and pour into prepared pan and smooth into pan.

Allow to firm up about one hour in the refrigerator. Remove and cut into squares and store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator for best results. Let stand out about 30 minutes to get to room temperature before eating (unless you like cold fudge).

You can leave out of the refrigerator in an airtight container for storing, provided that where you are storing it is not too warm. Makes about three pounds.

Note: If you want the plain fudge recipe, just omit the walnuts.

(c) 2009, Daily Press (Newport News, Va.). Via MCT.

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