Boulder Weekly on Facebook Boulder Weekly on Twitter Boulder Weekly on Tumblr Boulder Weekly's RSS feed Email Contact

Find Local Events (pick a date)
 
Browse Boulder real estate by neighborhood, school and zip code along with other homes for sale in Colorado on COhomefinder.com
Browse Boulder real estate by neighborhood, school and zip code along with other homes for sale in Colorado on COhomefinder.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Home » Articles » Boulderganic »  Environment Today
 
Wednesday, June 13,2012

Hundreds of Canadian Websites Go Dark To Protest Treatment of Environmental Charities

As dysfunctional as the American political system appears to be right now, it at least provides some checks and balances to unlimited power. In a parliamentary system like Canada's, if a government is in power long enough to pack the Senate and the Supreme Court and gets a majority government, it can pretty much do what it wants. Now that Stephen Harper has his majority (earned with only 39% of the vote, but that's what happens with a first-past-the-post system and a Liberal party meltdown) he is doing exactly what he wants.
Wednesday, June 13,2012

Retirees, Republicans, Greens Join to Fight Arizona Mine

Nestled as it is amid saguaro-studded hills, under a sky crisp blue by day and starry by night, you’d never guess Queen Valley, Arizona, is only 40 miles east of Phoenix. Its cozy homes surround a lush golf course, about four miles from a swath of state land known for four-wheeling, hunting, and bird-watching.
Wednesday, June 13,2012

Secrets of Natural Cocaine Production Revealed

Discovery of crucial step could aid pain-drug development, study says.

A mysterious but crucial step that coca plants use to build cocaine has been discovered, according to a group of biochemists.
Monday, June 11,2012

Is "Meat Glue" As Gross As It Sounds?

Broadcast news and social-media sites have been aflame with reports about something called "meat glue."
Monday, June 11,2012

Low-Cost Solar Brightens Lives in the Developing World

A decade ago, Katherine Lucey oversaw a heavily subsidized $1,500 solar-light installation in the rural district of Mpigi in central Uganda. The 60-watt rooftop solar panel system could power three lights in the four-room, off-the-grid house.
Monday, June 11,2012

Study Finds Ocean Warming Is Largely Man-Made

The study, published in Nature Climate Change, examined rising ocean temperatures over the past five decades and compared them with a dozen different models used to project climate change.
Friday, June 8,2012

Tiny corn could be the next big thing

If modern baseball can teach kids anything about science, it’s that steroids make things huge. We’ve all seen players with tree-trunk sized arms blast baseballs out of ballparks thanks to steroid hormones that bulk up muscle cells.
Friday, June 1,2012

Groundwater Depletion Accelerates Sea-Level Rise

Groundwater depletion will soon be as important a factor in contributing to sea-level rise as the melting of glaciers other than those in Greenland and Antarctica, scientists say.
Friday, June 1,2012

Why Bloomberg’s ‘Big Gulp ban’ could be good for New York City

If the food police has a chief, it may very well be New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. His battles with the food industry are quickly becoming the stuff of legend. And his latest gambit is his boldest yet: Bloomberg just announced a plan to ban the sale of any sweetened beverage over 16 ounces at all restaurants, delis, and sports arenas in New York City.
Wednesday, May 30,2012

Coping with two-headed fish and other effects of selenium

Muddy Creek is nondescript, a narrow stream trickling through the sagebrush steppe of southern Wyoming. But like many Western waterways, it carries selenium, a natural poison that seeps from rocks and dirt and accumulates in the food chain much as mercury does.
Close
Close