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Browse Boulder real estate by neighborhood, school and zip code along with other homes for sale in Colorado on COhomefinder.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Boulderganic

Ill winds paint dusty picture for Colorado snowpack

‘Extreme’ dust-on-snow events increasing

By Bob Berwyn

In the past few years, the desert has come to some ski slopes long before those first snowbirds hit the road, in the form of orange desert dust that coats high country peaks with an eerie tint. The dust arrives on strong southwest winds preceding spring snowstorms.

Boulderganic

Short film, big message

High school students explore climate change and agriculture in award-winning short film

By Caitlin Rockett

there was more work than time to do it — the students of Damian Tate’s Career Digital Arts program and Heather Riffel’s Urban Agriculture program at Arapahoe Ridge High School had seven weeks, from Jan. 6 to Feb. 21, to make a short film about how climate change affects agriculture.

Boulderganic

New Colorado wilderness held hostage in partisan congressional gridlock

By Bob Berwyn

After the budget battles of the last few years, it’s clear that Congress is fiscally dysfunctional, but our elected lawmakers also face challenges including finding the political will to support public land preservation bills, including several proposals in Colorado, where the Hermosa Creek Watershed Protection Act, the San Juan Mountains Wilderness Act and the Browns Canyon National Monument and Wilderness Act are all stalled in the fog of partisan gridlock.

Boulderganic

Where’s the beef (coming from)?

By Caitlin Rockett

The costs of dishing up mechanized meals by the plateful is on the table for some Conference of World Affairs panelists, whose panel on the industrialization of the food supply is expected to cover the human gains and environmental costs of the changes in how we grow our food.

Boulderganic

New Colorado wilderness held hostage in partisan congressional gridlock

New conservation PAC aims to tip the balance

By Bob Berwyn

After the budget battles of the last few years, it’s clear that Congress is fiscally dysfunctional, but our elected lawmakers also face challenges including finding the political will to support public land preservation bills, including several proposals in Colorado, where the Hermosa Creek Watershed Protection Act, the San Juan Mountains Wilderness Act and the Browns Canyon National Monument and Wilderness Act are all stalled in the fog of partisan gridlock.

Boulderganic

Where’s the beef (coming from)?

Panelists discuss the world’s increasingly industrialized food supply at Conference on World Affairs

By Caitlin Rockett

The costs of dishing up mechanized meals by the plateful is on the table for some Conference of World Affairs panelists, whose panel on the industrialization of the food supply is expected to cover the human gains and environmental costs of the changes in how we grow our food.

Boulderganic

Power cut

Could Colorado’s solar industry lose momentum as incentives ratchet down?

By Haley Gray

As the solar industry continues to boom nationally, Colorado could be falling behind. The National Solar Foundation found Colorado’s solar job growth to have stagnated in 2013, while 90 percent of the country saw solar job growth. The organization’s National Solar Job Census, released in February, dropped Colorado by three ranks in terms of solar jobs, though still claiming the respectable rank of nine.

Boulderganic

Farm-friendly

Farms and shoppers connect at local CSA fair

By Haley Gray

“What I think is really cool about CSA is you sort of thrive and perish with the farmer,” says Mary Rochelle of Pastures of Plenty, a local farm north of Niwot. “You’re really tied to them.

Boulderganic

State lawmakers take baby steps to address wildfire threat

Fundamental changes suggested by expert panel last summer not part of this year’s legislative agenda

By Bob Berwyn

Fundamental changes suggested by expert panel last summer not part of this year’s legislative agenda.

Boulderganic

The weaker sex?

Male vulnerabilities challenge a stereotype

By Alice Shabecoff

Contrary to cultural assumptions that boys are stronger and sturdier, basic biological weaknesses are built into the male of our species. These frailties leave them more vulnerable than girls to life’s hazards, including environmental pollutants such as insecticides, lead and plasticizers that target their brains or hormones.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Mallane Dressel

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reopened the public comment forum concerning the western yellow-billed cuckoo being added to the threatened species list for a second time in response to public demand and to allow researchers more time to finish collecting scientific information.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Mallane Dressel

The report, approved by representatives from 195 nations around the world, stated that from their review of climate change research they concluded that the evidence of climate changing impacts is most prevalent and obvious among natural ecosystems.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Mallane Dressel

According to researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Joint BioEnergy Institute, improvements must still be made to the process if the high energy biofuel is to reach the potency where it could be used in place of petroleumbased fuel.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

According to researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Joint BioEnergy Institute, improvements must still be made to the process if the high energy biofuel is to reach the potency where it could be used in place of petroleumbased fuel.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Mallane Dressel

According to Raise the Rivers website, its goal is to raise $10 million by 2017. These funds will be put toward planting native trees and purchasing permanent water rights dedicated to the delta.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Mallane Dressel

The Galapagos National Park teamed up with the San Diego Zoo Global to create a captive breeding program to save the critically endangered Mangrove finch.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs | Week of March 13

By Mallane Dressel

“Most likely, these alien lowland species are becoming increasingly successful in alpine terrain due to the warmer weather we have experienced in the past decades,” Ann Milnau, assistant professor at the Climate Impacts Research Centre in Sweden and one of the.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs | Week of Feb. 27

The ability to convert plastic bags into fuel may reduce the environmental impact produced by the 1 trillion bags produced each year in the U.S.

Eco-Briefs

ECO BRIEFS | Week of February 06

National park series aims to promote park advocacy among diverse communities

By Mallane Dressel

National parks launch film series to revive the adoration for national parks through true and diverse stories of people’s relationships with these parks.

Eco-Briefs

ECO BRIEFS | Week of Jan. 30

By Mallane Dressel

The damage the invasive population of lionfish in the Atlantic Ocean is doing to native species can be reduced if lionfish are eliminated in isolated, small areas, according to a new study from Oregon State University, Simon Fraser University, Reef Environment Education Foundation and other institutions.

Environment Today

Bag fee reduces paper and plastic bag use by 68 percent

Turns out, 10 cents matters

By Elizabeth Miller

It started costing $.10 each at the grocery line six months ago when a new city initiative began requiring grocery stores to charge a fee per disposable bag. Here's the results.

Environment Today

Floods likely to worsen in next century

Human development shares blame with climate change

By Josh Gross

New research published in the journal, Nature, investigates the risks of flooding in the coming decades and the outlook is grim.

Environment Today

Rhino decimation in one infographic

Shows a 900 percent increase in poaching since 2009

By Josh Gross

Data from anti-poaching organizations visualized.

Environment Today

Protecting more than a postage-stamp-sized ecosystem

Legal battle ensues to preserve Yukon’s Peel River Watershed

By Mallane Dressel

Yukon First Nations and Yukon-based environmental organizations are taking legal action to secure protections for the Peel River Watershed.

Environment Today

Study finds one-in-four shark species faces extinction

Global study cites overfishing as main threat

By Caitlin Rockett

A first-ever global study of the conservation status of over 1,000 shark, ray and related species reveals that at least one in every four existing species are heading toward extinction

Environment Today

New study finds increase in birth defects near fracking sites

Risk rise as much 30 percent

By Joel Dyer

A new study examining possible health risks to babies born within 10 miles of hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells was released January 28.

Environment Today

U.S. power plant emissions down

A shift to new technology creates more energy, releases fewer pollutants

By Caitlin Rockett

A new study shows that natural gas power plants that use a new technology to extract more energy from the fuel release significantly less carbon dioxide than coal-fired plants do.

Environment Today

Proposed CO legislation aims to reduce negative impacts of wildfire

Hickenlooper supports tax incentives, but shuns a costly state-owned aerial fleet.

By Caitlin Rockett

Gov. John Hickenlooper expressed support for new legislation aimed at combating wildfire in Colorado

Environment Today

EU announces energy and climate goals

Plan will last through 2030

By Josh Gross

The BBC is reporting that The European Commission has announced an outline of its energy and climate policy goals until 2030. "The Commissioners want a bindi

Environment Today

EPA releases final assessment of potential impacts of mining on Bristol Bay

Research indicates severe consequences for environment and native tribes

By Caitlin Rockett

A new report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emphasizes the negative impacts that large-scale gold and copper mining in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region could have

Special Editions

Growing up the greener way

After a long and in some ways challenging winter that began with a deluge that saw flooded gardens wiped out early, gardeners are likely eager to be getting their fingers back into the soil this spring. Our Boulderganic is focused, first, on providing some information for growers and local farm shoppers interested to know how to expect our produce markets to have responded in the face of the floods last fall.

Special Editions

The rise (and fall) of developmental toxins

By Caitlin Rockett

Recent research has made the public acutely aware of the growing list of commonly used industrial chemicals that are known to interfere with the human hormonal system. Like the Boulder Baby Company, many businesses across the country have shifted their business models to develop natural products that seek to create a toxic-free environment for kids.

Special Editions

Growing past the flood

By Mallane Dressel

Though more than six months have passed since the September flood that destroyed homes, displaced roads and scarred landscapes, remnants of the flood still mark the land of Boulder County in the form of erosion and sediment deposits. Farms, gardens and backyards with flood damage may need to be assessed or even tested for growers to determine what needs to be done to their property to restore its condition for another growing season.

Special Editions

High water and high stakes

By Steve Weishampel

The flood that hit Colorado in 2013 couldn’t have come at a worse time for many farmers. In the middle of September, many fruits and vegetables are near ripe and ready for harvest, leaving them vulnerable to damage from flood waters and the pollutants in the water. Some farms had to declare the 2013 harvest a total loss.

Special Editions

Back to the basics

By Andrea Neville

Here in Boulder County, being healthy isn’t a trend, it’s a lifestyle. Between all the biking, hiking and running, Coloradans are managing to remain one of the healthiest states in the nation. Lately, we have been hearing a lot about going back to the basics with all-natural food choices.

Special Editions

National parks push for sustainable food services

By Bob Berwyn

If your spring or summer travel plans this year include a national park visit, be sure to check out the healthier food options that are showing up in cafeterias and restaurants at our public lands crown jewels — and if you find some, be sure to give the chef and the park a shout-out to help encourage the transition to more sustainable eating habits.

Special Editions

Making it rain

By Mallane Dressel

It’s a practice that was used for thousands of years, but with the development of sewage systems and chemical fertilizer, the practice of recycling urine and using it as fertilizer went by the way side. Recently, this old practice gained new momentum in the U.

Special Editions

Sustaining Colorado’s forests

By Bob Berwyn

Colorado’s vast stands of lodgepole pines are part of one of the world’s great mountain forest belts, stretching nearly unbroken from Canada to Mexico. The forests first grew during an opportune period in Earth’s geological history: Receding ice sheets tilled the Rocky Mountains and provided moisture as the climate warmed after the last ice age. About 20 years ago, something tipped. Mountain pine beetles swarmed in ever-greater numbers, ultimately killing trees across more than 3 million acres.

Special Editions

Rockies flora show climate impact

By Tim Radford

An intensive study of the flora of one meadow in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado over nearly 40 years reveals a widespread and consistent pattern of climate-induced change.

Special Editions

Imbalance persists in county economy

By Steve Weishampel

While Boulder County is a “community of wealth,” in the words of Morgan McMillan, some statistical trends indicate that could gradually change. McMillan is the civic forum director for The Community Foundation, a Boulder-based non-profit dedicated to preparing the county for its future and encouraging charitable giving.

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