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Boulderganic

Vulture lookout

Getting acquainted with critical, if a bit creepy, neighbors

By Tom Winter

In the big picture, vultures are everywhere. They are comprised of two groups, Old World vultures and New World vultures. You can watch them fly almost anyplace except the colds of the Antarctic and, surprisingly, Australia, a continent that would seem well-suited for the birds.

Boulderganic

Open streets, open minds

A car-free day encourages Boulder residents to think about whether streets can be used for something other than cars

By Cassie Moore

The average pedestrian might not realize how wide Boulder’s sidewalks tend to be, and drivers might be annoyed at the barriers in the Goss Grove neighborhood that make 21st Street an impassable shortcut from Arapahoe Avenue to Canyon Boulevard.

Boulderganic

A river running

Pulse flow feeds more than the dry Colorado River delta

By Elizabeth Miller

Boulder Creek dried up, and the bridge on Broadway spanned nothing but an empty stretch of sand, and it stayed that way for decades, eventually people would forget what it had meant to see a stream running there.

Boulderganic

Growing wilder

Examining the James Peak Wilderness Area 50 years after the creation of the Wilderness Act

By Elizabeth Miller

Saving a piece of land from human activity actually requires a whole lot of human activity and cooperation. Years of it, really. In addition to those years of effort on the part of people, it takes a couple ingredients that also seem to be in short supply these days, not the least of which is a Congress capable of coming to bipartisan agreement.

Boulderganic

A bright future outside plastics

Local author charts a course toward a life without the modern era’s most ubiquitous material

By Elizabeth Miller

When Michael SanClements set out on an eco-dare to create no plastic waste for two weeks, he says it changed the way he saw the world by opening his eyes to just how prevalent plastics are. In his book, Plastic Purge: How to Use Less Plastic, Eat Better, Keep Toxins Out of Your Body, and Help Save the Sea Turtles, he documents a day in the life of a modern plastic consumer.

Boulderganic

The long shadow of a decade of loose enforcement

Report from Pennsylvania speaks to local fracking bans across U.S.

By Elizabeth Miller

Pennsylvania and Colorado may be a nation apart, but they’re side-by-side when it comes to having recently seen explosive increases in oil and gas development, specifically through the use of hydraulic fracturing in shale formations that are often drilled horizontally.

Boulderganic

Growing resistance

Bacteria that don’t respond to antibiotics are spreading while FDA fails to ban their use in livestock

By Elizabeth Miller

The World Health Organization statement on the matter reads like the setup to a sci-fi horror film — a once hypothetical problem has now become a major threat to public health. And no, we’re not talking about Ebola flying home on airplanes.

Boulderganic

Report criticizes EPA oversight of injection wells

By Naveena Sadasivam, ProPublica

The report, released Monday, July 28, by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, is critical of the Environmental Protection Agency’s inconsistent handling of safety inspections, poor record keeping and failure to adjust its guidelines to adapt to...

Boulderganic

Governor’s Water Plan could ignite water war

By Boulder Weekly Staff

In May of last year, Governor John Hickenlooper issued an executive order to create the Colorado Water Plan. As a part of the process established by the governor’s order, nine regional roundtables were empowered to create water plans for the river basins in their particular areas.

Boulderganic

The boy and the buffalo

After chaining himself to a Yellowstone gate to stop bison slaughter, Comfrey Jacobs faces three years without access to the buffalo herds

By Elizabeth Miller

The government’s controversial management activities for buffalo includes hunting; hazing with helicopters, horseback riders and ATVs; and baiting capture facilities with hay then hauling buffalo away for slaughter. Colorado native Comfrey Jacobs had watched, helpless, for months. And then he had enough

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

CLIMATE CHANGE EVANGELIST TO SPEAK AT CHAUTAUQUA AUDITORIUM

By Cassie Moore

She is an atmospheric scientist who studies climate change and its effect on humans and the natural environment, and she is also a conservative Christian. Hayhoe is coming to Boulder on a campaign to bridge the gap between those who believe in climate change and those who believe it is incompatible with their faith-based be.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Cassie Moore

In 1939, Rossby waves were discovered in jet streams and were linked to high and low pressure systems at ground level, which form Earth’s daily weather. The weather on Earth’s surface is controlled by jet streams, which are high winds in the atmosphere.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

By Scott Fromberg

Center. As a consequence, serious flooding occurred, leaving thousands of people displaced, hundreds of homes destroyed and eight people dead, according to a FEMA disaster report. While memories of these tragic events may be all too fresh at this point, that will not always be the case.

Eco-Briefs

Eco-briefs

By Scott Fromberg

“From our perspective, we are looking forward to working with the county and state to promote extra tourism and recreation in the area,” says Megan Crandell, a Bureau of Land Management representative. But, she adds, “There’s no official proposal yet.”.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

A recent study from the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin reveals that geothermal heat is melting the glacier from below. This heat under the glacier might be a key factor in the ice sheet’s ability to slide, which impacts the glacier’s stability as a whole.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

“Online databases, smartphone apps, crowd-sourcing and new hardware devices are making it easier to collect data on species,” Stuart L. Pimm, Doris Duke Professor of Conservation Ecology at Duke, said in a press release. “Most species remain unknown to science, and they likely face greater threats than the ones we do know.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

According to the American Heart Association, pollutants related to fuel combustion are the most serious because they are tiny and harder prevent. They lead to irritation of the lungs and blood vessels around the heart. Short-term exposure can increase risk of stroke and heart attack.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

“There is an urgent need to hold the world’s largest corporations accountable for the massive environmental destruction, human rights violations and climate pollution they cause,” Lindsey Allen, executive director for Rainforest Action Network, said in a press release.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

Once a testament to human ingenuity, river dams are now more often cited as examples of human intervention gone too far in manipulating the natural world. We’ve begun to better understand the effects of dams on river ecology and fish populations and raise concerns about their effects on the life and health of rivers. DamNation, a documentary film, explores that evolution from the welcome the Hoover Dam received to the welcomed destruction of dams and the free flow of water that resumed.

Eco-Briefs

eco-briefs

Stream flows in watersheds with bark beetle infestation increase by about 30 percent, according to new research from the National Science Foundation, and can be connected to previous research that found an increase in carcinogenic disinfection by-products in water.

Special Editions

Boulderganic Summer issue is here!

As residents of the Centennial State, we know Colorado is beautiful — from the farms of its sweeping eastern plains to the rugged, snow-capped peaks of the Rocky Mountains to its semi-arid southwestern chaparral deserts. It’s not hard to understand why Colorado is the fourth fastest growing state in the nation.

Special Editions

Ash borers? You can blame Marco Polo’s camels

With limited treatment options, arborists emphasize replanting with different species

By Bob Berwyn

The story of invasive species goes all the way back to the earliest stages of human development, when bands of hominids dispersing from Africa carried with them the crumbs, seeds and eggs of whatever ecosystems they happened to be passing through. And you can be sure that, along with silk and spices, Marco Polo’s camels transported disease-ridden fleas between Europe and Asia.

Special Editions

New hydropower could ease transition from fossil fuels

New study suggests the U.S. could add enough hydropower to provide electricity for up to 65 million homes

By Bob Berwyn

If you’ve ever spent time around one of Colorado’s rivers or streams during spring and summer runoff, you’ve had a taste of nature at its best. Supercharged, ionized air, forest and wildflowers, and, above all, massive torrents of water sweeping from the high Rockies out into the plains, or through sandstone canyons toward the distant Pacific.

Special Editions

Green your grill

Your charcoal grill is bad for the environment and your health, but making it more environmentally friendly is easy to do

By Caitlin Rockett

It’s a tradition that’s quintessential to summer. It just doesn’t quite feel like summer until you’ve tossed a few burgers (maybe a couple portabella caps for the veggie crowd) on the grill, a cold beer in one hand and tongs in the other. But few of us ever stop to think about the environmental impact of our summer barbeques.

Special Editions

Corporate gardening for a sustainable world

Making a difference on your lunch break with CorpCROP

By Andrea Neville

CorpCROP is on a mission to get you off your chair and out into the sunlight. With the rise in health issues due to sitting behind a desk all day, people like Jennifer Klafin, founder and managing director of CorpCROP, are figuring out ways to help keep office workers happier and healthier.

Special Editions

Reinventing the toilet

University of Colorado team uses the power of the sun to turn human waste into fuel

By Steven Kreimendahl

Karl Linden and his research team are not reinventing the wheel, but they are trying to reinvent the toilet. It began several years ago for Linden, a professor of environmental engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder, in a class he taught about water sanitation and hygiene. He gave a short assignment about potential global health initiatives.

Special Editions

Nothing but net-zero

One Boulder County residence just took energy efficiency to a new level

By Haley Gray

Boulder County’s most energy efficient home sits at 6712 Jay Road. The residence, to be completed within a year, is expected to produce 29 percent more energy than it consumes using a combination of solar, wind and geothermal systems.

Special Editions

A community mission

The Second Kitchen food co-op expands fast without forgetting why they started in the first place

By Mallane Dressel

Boulder’s first food co-op, The Second Kitchen, is trying to make a bigger difference when it comes to quality and sustainability of food distribution, while not forgetting their humble beginnings. The organization’s name is a tribute to those humble begins, when co-founder Sara Brody once used the second kitchen of her duplex to house large sacks of grains and other products for it’s first few years as a buy-in club.

Special Editions

One man’s trash is another man’s business venture

New state legislation aims to clean up and close Colorado’s tire dumps while stimulating the market for recycling

By Scott Fromberg

Northeast of Denver in the small town of Hudson lies the largest tire dump in the U.S., known by many as Tire Mountain. Immediately south of Colorado Springs sits the nation’s second largest tire dump. Combined, the Rubber Manufacturing Association says, Colorado’s tire dumps, known as monofills, accounted for 40 percent of the nation’s waste tires in 2011 — an estimated 60 million tires.

Special Editions

Playing hurt

Why ignoring injuries leads to more trouble

By James Dziezynski

Many people identify strongly with their favorite sports. Because of that passion — or obsession — we get used to playing hurt. It’s not unusual to see people scaling the walls at the climbing gym with a soft cast on their leg or watching runners zip around trails with their arm in a sling.

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