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Arts

Arts | Week of Feb. 26, 2015

rePOPulated: Contemporary Perspectives on Pop Art..

Arts

Cultural tensions on display

Contemporary Tibetan art exhibit explores changing attitudes

By Devin Blomquist

A massive painting on melted bubble wrap depicts American rock legend, Gene Simmons of Kiss, complete with proverbial white and black face paint and his signature facial expression. The painting hangs to the right of another painting on bubble wrap, this one depicting the manifestation of one of Tibet’s protector deities, Dorge Drakkten.

Arts

Arts | Week of Feb. 19, 2015

Colorado pop artist Phil Bender has spent the last 30 years putting his spin on everday objects. See his work on display at the Arvada Center..

Arts

Not your average stoner

Local artist takes stone balancing to an ‘impossible’ level

By Devin Blomquist

Michael Grab thrives on the impossible. In fact, the professional stone balancer has made the phrase “as impossible as possible” the motto by which he creates. Most of his sculptures, which can often be found among the ripples of Boulder Creek, feature stones of varying shapes, sizes and textures balancing atop one another so methodically, so delicately, it appears as though a single breath could bring them tumbling down.

Arts

Arts | Week of Feb. 12 , 2015

Shari Farabaugh uses oil paint to capture a variety of subjects in her new exhibit at the NCAR gallery..

Arts

Talk

Global warming can be a tiring issue. If you need a new perspective, try looking at it through the lens of Jungian theory. NCAR Gallery is hosting a talk with artist Jane McMahan and climate scientist and Jungian analyst Jeffrey Kiehl.

Arts

Arts | Week of Feb. 5, 2015

First Glance/Second Look: Quilts from the Denver Art Museum Collection..

Arts

Premiere

In the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art’s newest exhibit, Substrate, artists focus on shifting the perspective. While you’d usually expect for the art to be on the walls of the museum, Substrate focuses on the floors. This concept forces the viewers to interact and engage with the museum itself.

Arts

Arts | Week of Jan. 29, 2015

First Glance/Second Look: Quilts from the Denver Art Museum Collection..

Arts

poetry

Program and the subsequent essay issue of the paper, local poet Troy Suben approached the editorial staff with an idea: What about running poetry in the paper on a weekly basis? We’ve undertaken the experiment here and kick off the project with a few poems from Suben himself, who will henceforward curate this collection.

Books

Words | Week of Feb. 26, 2015

Island on Fire — by Alexandra Witze and Jeff Kanipe..

Books

Poetry

Mordy makes for to exercise and it just does. A body what it machine. Where it creak he sluck the studs. Tell me do you visit lately? Your body over wine? Love eyes itself in the machine lovely. His muscles loose like a gum. Everything hum. What gumbles haply in the blood.

Books

Words | Week of Feb. 19, 2015

Week to Strong: Thought Shifting Mental Shape-Up Plan — by Kat Cowley..

Books

Words | Week of Feb. 12, 2015

Authors Aby Kaupang, Jon Thompson and John Gallagher..

Books

(Gr)Apple

“I want” “I can’t” “I’ll never” ---------- ---------- ---------- this is time’s uncatchable beam, silence, always a little bit leaving— (to make sure staying undressed is a choice) ---------------------------------------- track the refusal of “I am”...

Books

Words | Week of Feb. 5, 2015

Leaving Before the Rains Come — by Alexandra Fuller..

Books

poetry

Michael Levell lives in Denver and teaches writing and literature in Aurora. Send your poetry submissions of 250 words or fewer to poetry@boulderweekly.com.

Books

Words | Week of Jan. 29, 2015

Tony Jones; or, The Expanded Autobiography — by Paul Echeverria..

Books

Words | Week of Jan. 22, 2015

Bilingual Spanish/English Storytime/Hora de Cuentos Bilingües..

Books

A career in keeping you scared of the dark

Author Stephen Graham Jones on the whys and hows of horror

By Elizabeth Miller

He’s talking about approaching being a writer like carpentry; some stories flow from a place in need of bloodletting, and some simply need to be hammered together. He prides himself on being able to take those assignments and build some furniture.

Music

Getting old, then new again

How theNEWDEAL got its jam back

By Dave Kirby

Jamie Shields, keyboardist and founder of theNEWDEAL, was enjoying a break from the brain-lock cold last week. Well, what passes for a break from it in Toronto, anyway. “Yeah, it’s only 10 below today,” he said with a laugh. Well, all right then, time for a vacation. So what passes for a vacation for Shields is taking his jamtronica trio out again for a swing through Colorado (where it isn’t much warmer these days), Texas and the East Coast for morsel-sized bits of road work. Born in the early days of jamtronica, the- NEWDEAL had been one of the genre’s more spontaneous, less mannered outfits, deeply invested in euphoric galactic anthems, layers of Shields’ synth colliding and sparkling across a furious rhythm section.

Music

Carrettin and the Boulder Bach Festival take a new look at the B-minor Mass

By Peter Alexander

Bach’s B-minor Mass is one of the most studied, most wellknown works of music there is. But have all the answers been found to performing this monumental work? Zachary Carrettin, the music director of the Boulder Bach Festival and conductor for the B-minor Mass this weekend, doesn’t think so.

Music

Celebrate

The baobab tree has been a symbol of community in West Africa for generations. People gather under it to drum, dance, sing and tell stories. The BaoBao festival celebrates this tradition and has been bringing African flavor to Colorado for 12 years. On March 3, head to Shine Restaurant for some festivities from the statewide festival.

Music

Listen

Houndmouth’s creation was a matter of the right place at the right time. The band, hailing from southern Indiana, started off as loose friends, each with a different musical background — a mix of blues, Motown, acoustic, classic rock and bluegrass. Houndmouth’s music lies in that sweet spot between alternative, country and folk.

Music

Winning musicianship

Wood Brothers may not have a shelf of Grammys, but they’ve got a different take on success

By Dave Kirby

To be completely candid, we missed most of the Grammy Awards a couple of weeks ago, except for the segment where the ever camera-shy Madonna seemed to be commanding a legion of worshipping satyrs, a spectacle made only more surreal with the sound off at our local gym before expressionless, lycraclad Boulderites pumping away on their ellipticals.

Music

Throw down your preconceived notions

Jake Schepps challenges the banjo’s place in music

By Caitlin Rockett

If the banjo was an actor in today’s movie industry, it would be suffering from a severe case of typecasting, relentlessly placed in the role of Appalachian hillbilly instrument, a medium suited only for bluegrass, country and folk music.

Music

Listen

With the recent popularity of a cappella, try delving into its more historic roots with the Ars Nova Singers. The Boulder-based group sings the a cappella music of the Renaissance and the 20th and 21st centuries. The vocal combination of the 36 choral musicians offers a soothing, hauntingly-beautiful sound.

Music

Putting down another piece in the Jorma Kaukonen puzzle

By Joel Dyer

If you think of Jorma Kaukonen’s career as a jigsaw puzzle, the whole thing sort of makes sense. It began as a pile of disjointed pieces containing just a hint or color of things to come. Each day, each year, each decade the puzzle becomes more complete. Every new piece is connected to an older one while always expanding the emerging picture of the artist. Today we see an impressive, though still progressing, image of a musician that has been 50 years in the making.

Music

Paying homage to melting pot musicians

Gumbo Le Funque talks jazz and Green Party ahead of Mardi Gras

By Gavin Dahl

For Gumbo Le Funque frontman and sax player Jason Justice, there is more to music than having a good time. Getting instruments to kids facing tough economic conditions and high-stakes school testing provides a crucial opportunity for experiential learning, he says.

Music

moe. blows out a few candles

The band gives their moe.down festival a rest — for now

By Dave Kirby

moe.down did carry an early repute as one of the essential stops on the groove scene circuit, reinforcing the notion that moe. was one of the primary stanchions in the last two decades’ jam band movement. That vestigial tag continues to follow the band around, at least in some of the press and promoter blather around them, and it’s probably misplaced.

Panorama

New calendar service: Boulder County Events

Boulder Weekly is launching a new presentation of our calendar, now known as Boulder County Events.

Panorama

Events Calendar | Week of January 10, 2013

Surrealist painter Sky Black will exhibit his work at Trident Cafe and Bookstore in January.

Panorama

Arts | Week of January 10, 2013

Matt Smith's 'Guardians of Ediza' is among the paintings on the American West on view at Gallery 1261.

Panorama

Theater | Week of January 10, 2013

The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged) continues at Jesters Dinner Theatre.

Panorama

Words | Week of January 10, 2013

Jon Sands, author of The New Clean, reads at 7 p.m. Jan. 11 at Innisfree Poetry Bookstore.

Panorama

Event Calendar | Week of January 3, 2013

Gipsy Moon plays Jan. 3 at the Pioneer Inn and Jan. 4 at Oskar Blues Home Made Liquids and Solids.

Panorama

Arts | Week of January 03, 2013

Loretta Young-Gautier´s photographs are on display at the Byers-Evans house.

Panorama

Theater | Week of January 03, 2013

Newark Violenta, a tribute to Italian crime cinema from the 1970s, premieres at The Edge Theater Company.

Panorama

Words | Week of January 03, 2013

Brian Gast, author of The Business of Wanting More, will appear at Tattered Cover Jan. 8.

Panorama

Event Calendar | Week of December 27, 2012

The Motet plays the Fox Theatre Dec. 30 and 31.

Reel To Reel

Goodbye to all of that

Beyond the end with ‘Goodbye to Language’

By Michael J. Casey

In 1960, Jean-Luc Godard revolutionized cinema. Breathless wasn’t just a break from the old ways of filmmaking, it was as if cinema had cracked off and begun again. Seven years later, Godard concluded Weekend with the title card, “Fin... de cinema.” It was a cheeky moment, but for the French critic turned filmmaker, it had razor sharp teeth. Now the 84-yearold director is back with another entry into his ever-evolving theory of cinema and this time around he tackles the money-grubbing gimmick of 3-D. Only in the hands of Godard, it isn’t a gimmick, it’s just another arrow in his quiver.

Reel To Reel

Fight

Climate change has been rippling through our world for the past few decades. Colorado is suffering from summer-like temperatures in winter to a severe fire season that’s destroying its forests. Firefighters are on the front line of this problem seeing the lasting damages and devastation.

Reel To Reel

To God, there is no zero

From the infinitesimal to the infinite in ‘The Incredible Shrinking Man’

By Michael J. Casey

They called them “B-Movies,” genre films (westerns, noir, horror, sci-fi, etc.) made on shoestring budgets with leads played by actors, not stars, and directors who were journeymen, not auteurs. The 1950s were their heyday and they played great on a rainy Saturday afternoon.

Reel To Reel

film

THE BABADOOK This movie is being pigeon-holed as horror, but don’t discount it. It compares well with Kubricks’s The Shining and Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby as a deeply nuanced and powerful film, well worth the scary bits.

Reel To Reel

Photographing philosophy

By Michael J. Casey

Photographing philosophy.

Reel To Reel

Punch

Documentary Fight Church tells the story of the meeting of two unlikely worlds: Christianity and mixed martial arts. While, of course, it’s natural for pastors to have hobbies, cage fighting is a peculiar choice for those who preach to “love thy neighbor.

Reel To Reel

When the good comes undone

The bleak fallout of ‘Little Accidents’

By Michael J. Casey

There is Owen ( Jacob Lofland), a high school student who lost his father in the cavein. Owen has taken on the responsibility of his brother with Down syndrome (Beau Wright) while his mother (Chloë Sevigny) tries to put food on the table.

Reel To Reel

L'enfant du cinema

One night with Leos Carax

By Michael J. Casey

Reel To Reel

Love in all the wrong places

‘Copenhagen’ just a diversion

By Michael J. Casey

William (Gethin Anthony) is 28, loud, abrasive and generally unpleasant to be around. He yells, swears, leers, drinks too much and thinks too little. He is your typical obnoxious American abroad, both to the fine people of Demark and to his two traveling companions.

Reel To Reel

Children of the night

Iranian New Wave meets vampire stories in ‘A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night’

By Michael J. Casey

Instead, their bodies are pushed into a ravine in the middle of town, one that is starting crowded. It’s business as usual in Bad City. or not Arash (Arash Marandi) The or what she is capable of — doesn’t really matter. He is attracted to her. Attracted in that distant, cool, blue jean, James Dean, let’s-just-listen-to-the-music, kind of way.

Screen

Hello, GoodBye

Bidding Farewell to a long-time friend Bill Vielehr —a Rembrance

By Dave Kirby

The BIFF Chairman and longtime Boulder metal sculptor left this planet unexpectedly last October — a shock to the system for his staggeringly wide circle of friends, including this writer — but Kathy Beeck, BIFF co-founder and a friend of Vielehr’s...

Screen

Best in show

BIFF brings another great year of films

The Boulder International Film Festival is the cherry on top for a town with an already-impressive film scene. Throw in some big stars, up-and-coming filmmakers, foreign favorites and fascinating documentaries and you’ve got the perfect weekend for a cinephile. Here’s a look at a handful of stand-out films visiting this year.

Screen

Please sir, may I have my job?

‘Two Days, One Night’ pits poor versus poor

By Ryan Syrek

Sit down, Sartre. Writers/directors Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne get it a bit more right: Hell isn’t just other people. Hell is asking other people to surrender their bonuses so you can keep your job. Two Days, One Night is a harrowing social allegory, a dramatic minimization of a growing socioeconomic reality. The bosses of the world are greedily devouring an ever-expanding amount of wealth, leaving the impoverished to fight each other for table scraps. It is undignified, disgusting and downright heartbreaking to watch human beings alternate between fighting and begging each other for basic survival needs.

Screen

Shadyac's Travels

Boulder has a new face, CU has a new professor and a filmmaker has a new lease on life

By Michael J. Casey

The artist’s life is one of constant searching. Theirs is a restless journey, one constantly straining to see over the next horizon — and filmmaker Tom Shadyac’s journey has taken some unexpected turns that have finally brought him to Boulder.

Screen

I’m-a let you finish, but…

The only list of the best and worst films of 2014 you need

By Ryan Syrek

Somehow Jake Gyllenhaal has transformed into one of the best actors of our era. His performance here is diabolically perfect. Writer/director Dan Gilroy spits in the face of screenwriting 101, as his main character never evolves or changes. Oh, and if there was an award for “best scene of the year,” the final shootout in this one would be a shoo-in.

Screen

Heaven is overrated

‘Jupiter Ascending’ delivers fun in a world of darkness

By Ryan Syrek

Mila Kunis plays the titular Jupiter, a sad sack who cleans houses with her family for a living. Turns out, she’s the reincarnation of a famous space alien who once ran the corporation that controls the universe.

Screen

Don’t let millennials time travel

‘Project Almanac’ can go to hell%u2028

By Ryan Syrek

Man, you know a movie is bad when writing a review for it ruins your who just got into MIT but acts like he sociopathic needs to write a note on his hand reminding him it goes “unzip, then pee.” His dead dad was an inventor who left an unfinished time machine in thetime.

Screen

IFS packs its schedule with female directors and its first 3D screening

A new season starts up for IFS

By Amanda Moutinho

“Our goal is to provide a range of titles that honor the past as well as the present,” Kjolseth says. “Making sure to sprinkle in enough gems that might have been overlooked, or that otherwise wouldn’t be seen, along with titles that people really want to see.

Screen

The sound of a true American voice

Shorts, ‘Chop Shop’ and Ramin Bahrani at IFS

By Michael J. Casey

Bahrani is more than just a filmmaker, he also teaches film directing at Columbia University’s graduate program in New York City. And he will be on hand Feb. 3 at the International Film Series, his visit sponsored by Conference on World Affairs Athenaeum and Roser Visiting Artist Program.

Screen

The long on the shorts

2015’s Oscar-nominated live-action and animated shorts

By Ryan Syrek

‘A SINGLE LIFE,’ DIRECTORS: MARIEKE BLAAU, JORIS OPRINS, JOB ROGGEVEEN.

Stage

Fecking brilliant

Miners and McDonagh are a cracking match

By Gary Zeidner

If you’ve never seen the sadly short-lived British TV series Father Ted (R.I.P. Dermot Morgan), you owe it to yourself to give it a look. It’s a screamingly funny show set on the fictitious Craggy Island off Ireland’s western coast. It is also the spiritual sibling to Martin McDonagh’s The Cripple of Inishmaan, which takes place on a real island in the same general vicinity.

Stage

Learn

Not many people know what it’s like to walk on the moon. Luckily, the Distinguished Speakers Board is bringing Buzz Aldrin to Boulder to enlighten the rest of us. Aldrin was the lunar module pilot on the Apollo 11 mission in 1969. He was the second person to walk on the moon, following Neil Armstrong’s one small step for man.

Stage

Theater | Week of Feb. 26, 2015

Twelfth Night — presented by The Upstart Crow..

Stage

Laugh

Hannibal Buress has been rising through the comedy scene recently. After having brief writing stints on Saturday Night Live and 30 Rock, Buress has been popping up everywhere, from co-hosting The Eric André Show to landing a gig on Broad City to rocking all the major late-night talk shows.

Stage

Theater | Week of Feb. 19, 2015

1224 Washington Ave., Denver, 303-935- 3044. Through March 8..

Stage

Silence isn’t always golden

A rare blunder by BETC

By Gary Zeidner

The Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company (BETC) has proven itself to be one of the best theatre companies in Boulder or, truly, anywhere. It consistently produces lively, entertaining, thought-provoking plays by a wide variety of playwrights ranging from famous to obscure.

Stage

Laugh

Normal Heights is a musical comedy about love, sexuality, masculinity and fitting in, told through a gay gentleman’s experiences. Written and performed by University of Colorado writing professor Jim Walker, the show was inspired by Walker’s uncle, who was forcibly outed in 1950s San Diego.

Stage

Tease

The art of the tease has been lost in the age of Tinder and Snapchat. But some are trying to keep it alive like the ladies of Boulder Burlesque. In their Valentine’s show Love & Loss at The Dairy, watch them explore the spectrum of relationships — from broken to blissful.

Stage

Learn

Throughout her life, Dorothy Rupert has worn several hats. She spent 35 years as a public high school teacher and counselor and 14 years in the Colorado House and Senate. She’s fought for women’s and human’s rights issues for decades. Listen to Rupert tell her stories of traveling throughout the world spreading peace.

Stage

Theater | Week of Feb. 12, 2015

Spend Valentine’s Day with Jane Lynch in See Jane Sing!.

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