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Thursday, April 2,2015

Conference on World Affairs

Bringing the world to Boulder

By Caitlin Rockett and Amanda Moutinho
It’s that time of year again, when the World’s literati make their annual migration to Boulder to discuss and debate the planet’s most pressing issues ... and a bunch of other topics that are really fun and interesting. That’s right, it’s time for the Conference on World Affairs.
Thursday, April 2,2015

Differences of opinion on safety remain for Casey school

Air quality testing and symptoms survey making slow progress

By Elizabeth Miller
In a January email exchange between Rast and Casey Principal Justin McMillan, Rast asked McMillan to confirm that classes were moved, what the readings were on hydrogen sulfide monitors in the areas of the school, where odors were reported that day and whether the principal planned to update parents.
Thursday, April 2,2015

Hoosier ruckus

Why people are up in arms about Indiana’s new ‘religious freedom’ act and not other states’

By Matt Cortina
The uproar was immediate when Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signed into law the Indiana Religious Freedom Restoration Act on March 26. Since, governments and businesses have boycotted the state, bands and artists have cancelled tour dates, and Pence has had to publicly clarify the intent of the law.
Thursday, March 26,2015

In case you missed it

So the Republican version of the U.S.S. Minnow is now headed out to sea on a three-hour tour with Cruz playing the role of the Skipper. Oddsmakers are betting that Donald Trump will be cast as Gilligan but who really knows with these guys. Can you say, “Nine! Nine! Nine!”?.
Thursday, March 26,2015

The magic of Kesem

CU Boulder students lead the second year of Camp Kesem, a summer program that supports children through a parent’s cancer

By Caitlin Rockett
When Al Visconti was diagnosed with synovial sarcoma in 2004, his son was only 4 weeks old. Intense chemotherapy followed, as well as debates about whether the affected leg would need to be amputated. Surgery saved the leg, but the chemo continued. For nine months, Vicsonti would come home from the doctor connected to a pump that delivered drugs for five days straight. He endured this every three weeks for the entire nine months.
Thursday, March 26,2015

Whitewashing the past

A Chicano activist remembers a violent high school walkout 46 years later

By Matt Cortina
Forty-six years ago, a group of Denver high school students and Chicano supporters participated in a walkout. Some were beaten by police and arrested. They were protesting the fact that a history teacher was teaching them a washed-over, ethnocentric version of history.
Thursday, March 26,2015

news briefs

New rules released for hydraulic fracturing on public and tribal lands by the U.S. Department of the Interior called for increased transparency on chemicals used by posting them to the website FracFocus within 30 days of completing operations, “validation of well integrity and strong cement barriers between the wellbore and water zones through which the wellbore passes”; “higher standards for interim storage of recovered waste fluids from hydraulic fracturing to mitigate risks to air, water and wildlife”; and “measures to lower the risks of crosswell contamination with chemicals and fluids used in the fracturing operation.”
Thursday, March 19,2015

In case you missed it

It’s because you and your lazy coworkers are contributing to a $1.9 billion, with a “B,” loss in worker productivity. So when you suddenly see Tom jump from his cubicle screaming, “Yes,” just know that it’s not because he finally finished the spreadsheet he should have turned in two days ago.
Thursday, March 19,2015

BLACK IN BOULDER

Boulder racism through the eyes of people of color

By Matt Cortina
It’s the Boulder liberal attitude versus the KKK,” says Derrick Jones, a black professor at Naropa living in Boulder. He’s trying to decide what’s worse. “For me, I can respect to a degree someone who identifies as a member of the KKK and is out with their views. It’s a little easier to take in, digest and in some degree respect than to encounter racism denial, because I know what I’m getting. It’s a little harder to accept the racist activity or the perpetuation of a privilege structure from someone who claims to be colorblind or not racist or liberal.”
Thursday, March 19,2015

Happy Sunshine Week: Introducing The Foilies

By Dave Maass
Welcome once again to Sunshine Week! It’s that time of year when journalists, citizen watchdogs, community activists, data wizards, political gadflies, public-records litigators and open-gov fanatics come together to champion the cause of transparency and commiserate over the obstacles we face everyday while chasing sunlight.
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