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Thursday, March 12,2015

Taking aim

County commissioners ban bow and arrow use in Sugarloaf community

By Matt Cortina
Is a bow and arrow a firearm? Yes, according to the Boulder County Commissioners, but only on Sugarloaf Mountain. The commissioners voted unanimously on Monday, March 9, to adopt a resolution that will ban the use of bows and arrows in a small community up on Sugarloaf Mountain. The resolution “clarifies” a 1980 resolution that established a firearms discharge district in the area that prohibited the use of firearms in the 4-and-a-halfsquare-mile area of private and public land in the area.
Thursday, March 12,2015

Not in this Statehouse

Bill to weaken renewable energy standards came from ALEC

By Elizabeth Miller
The state bill that would have rolled back Colorado’s renewable energy standards to half of their proposed levels was co-sponsored by legislators who have been linked to the fossil fuel-funded American Legislative Exchange Council. The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) describes itself as “the nation’s largest nonpartisan, voluntary membership organization of state legislators. The organization advances limited government, free markets and federalism,” in a letter to Google Chairman Eric Schmidt written in response to his comments on the company’s choice in September to part ways with the organization.
Thursday, March 12,2015

news briefs

genes are almost always present in bison. The animals that will comprise the Laramie Foothills Bison Conservation Herd have been quarantined for more than a decade, tested for bovine brucellosis, which affects bison, cattle and elk and can cause spontaneous abortions.
Thursday, March 5,2015

In case you missed it

reminding us that if you are the Democratic nominee for president, the people of the United States will be forced, once again, to accept four more years of dishonest, manipulative, unproductive, anti-progressive politics no matter which major party wins the election.
Thursday, March 5,2015

Boulder to Belize

A Nederland teacher helps students make a big difference in a small country

By Caitlin Rockett
In 1986, a 26-year-old woman from Colorado made her way to Los Angeles to march to Washington, D.C., to raise awareness about the mounting danger of nuclear proliferation — the Great Peace March took nine months, 3,700 miles and a lot of dedication. As one might imagine, the experience made an indelible impression on young Lori Graff (now Lori Kinczel), from the message she was spreading to the mental and physical endurance it took to get to Washington D.C. But the march was fated to do more than simply stir Kinczel’s political ideologies and try her fortitude — she made a friend that would, nearly 30 years later, help Kinczel show her students at Nederland Middle/Senior High School how they could make a big difference in the lives of children in the small Central American country of Belize.
Thursday, March 5,2015

Selling points

Complaints of mobile park owners blocking sales and managing heavy-handedly surface... again

By Matt Cortina
Jerry Allen wants to sell his home. All he has to do is move it out of Boulder. Allen, 62, and his wife own a manufactured (or mobile) home in the Boulder mobile home park Vista Village. The Allens recently finished building their dream lodge in Estes Park and went to the Vista Village management office to tell them they were planning to sell their home.
Thursday, March 5,2015

Task force recommendations and near misses

The right to vote on setbacks and local control was traded for this task force. So what did we get?

By Elizabeth Miller
When Governor John Hickenlooper handpicked his task force to examine state and local regulations concerning oil and gas operations, his stated intent was to resolve those issues involving competing regulatory entities and multiple jurisdictions including state and local governments, surface and mineral owners, oil and gas operators and local community members concerned about the effects of drilling and fracking. The task force itself was crafted as a compromise to pull initiatives from last November’s ballot that would have allowed Colorado voters to weigh in on the rights of local communities to defend their environment and citizens, and on establishing a 2,000-foot setback from occupied buildings. In his executive order for the task force, the governor charged its members with addressing those issues, as well as drillingrelated concerns over noise, air quality and dust in a state valued as much by the people who choose to make Colorado their home as by the corporations invested in extracting the state’s oil and gas.
Thursday, February 26,2015

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

By Boulder Weekly Staff
Those amendments would have given greater control to local governments over drilling and fracking and created 2,000-foot setbacks between oil and gas operations and people’s homes and schools. But on the very day that the signatures were to be turned over to the Secretary of State’s office, they were traded away by Courtesy of Co.
Thursday, February 26,2015

The trouble with Casey

Parents press for school closure in the face of unresolved concerns over toxic gas at school

By Elizabeth Miller
Here’s what we know for sure about the air at Casey Middle School: It smells bad. Since the new, $33 million rebuilt school opened in August 2010 and became home to just under 600 students and about 50 teachers, reports have circulated of air that smells like rotten eggs and, sometimes, feces. Air monitors brought into the school have identified levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a colorless, flammable gas known for its rotten egg smell. Those levels, according to reports from now multiple third-party monitoring agencies, are below the levels that immediately trigger cause for concern for adults in the work place. But here’s the thing: That may not be true for children.
Thursday, February 26,2015

Hightide

The roots of rising heroin abuse and what it means for Boulder County

By Matt Cortina
Ashley is 32. She looks 52. A 20-year addiction to heroin has changed her. She sits in Boulder County detox, nine months sober, and talks about the most traumatic experience she’s had in her life. It lingers more than giving up two children, than walking away from a nursing job, and from injecting $300 of heroin into her body almost every day for two decades. “He would show up every now and then,” Ashley says. “He’d come find me if he needed something. He lived in Longmont. He would come to Boulder just to get drugs. He had a house. He ran a business. So, I mean, he had a lot going for him, and it was just really sad.”
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