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Thursday, June 18,2015

Hot dino-on-dino action

‘Jurassic World’ is what you wanted

By Ryan Syrek
Hand a kid two dinosaur toys. Said kid will not use them to contemplate evolutionary biology. Said kid will smash the two of them together, simulating an epic dino-smackdown while emitting a likely annoying reptilian howl. Jurassic World is that but with a $150 million budget. Director Colin Trevorrow went from quirky indie Safety Not Guaranteed to blockbuster franchise revival faster than you can ask, “How many zeroes are on that check again?” Those hoping Trevorrow managed to retain the light, whimsical, creative tone of his former effort should remember this is a movie about dinosaurs eating people. When it comes to people eating, Jurassic World does it better than most.
Thursday, June 18,2015

Watch

Take your love for animals a step further and attend the Bow Wow Film Festival — a traveling film festival that strives to spread the love for dogs everywhere by shining a spotlight on man’s best friend. This event features a compilation of the years’ best doggie-themed footage from funny to heartwarming to educational.
Thursday, June 11,2015

On agents and agency

‘Spy’ treats Melissa McCarthy like a real person%u2028

By Ryan Syrek
Melissa McCarthy is immensely talented, armed with a stunning repertoire of acting skills. So, of course, Hollywood sees her and claps its collective hands together, yelling “Make the funny lady fall down again!” Spy is writer/director (and frequent McCarthy collaborator) Paul Feig’s attempt to save his friend from a Jack Blackian fate. In a clever conceit, he allows McCarthy to trot out her staid, clichéd usual characters, only to abandon them in favor of something authentic. Had it not been for one painfully tone deaf, unfunny, offensive running gag, Spy would have been damn good and not simply good.
Thursday, June 4,2015

Quake and stakes

‘San Andreas’ is morally terrible, kind of watchable

By Ryan Syrek
As people die in ugly, awful ways all around him, Ray ignores them in order to save his estranged wife and loving daughter. If you’re not related to Ray, sorry about your death by fire or pulverization, but you can’t ride in the city’s helicopter or the plane he steals, truck he steals or boat he steals.
Thursday, June 4,2015

The kid in the bird

‘I Am Big Bird’ brings Caroll Spinney’s story to the big screen

By Michael J. Casey
There is one thing you never do on Sesame Street and that is put someone down. “Our business is not to ridicule,” Caroll Spinney — the long time puppeteer inside Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch — tells Boulder Weekly. “Dumb is a word we never use on Sesame Street,” Spinney says. “Or stupid,” adds Big Bird.
Thursday, May 28,2015

All refrain

‘Pitch Perfect 2’ is a worthy encore

By Ryan Syrek
Fact: It’s harder to make people laugh than cry. Fact: It’s harder to make someone laugh a second time than the first. Conclusion: Comedy sequels are the hardest sequels to make satisfying. Pitch Perfect was a comedy ninja, stealthily stepping from shadows to chuck a throwing star of hilarity into the funny bone of unsuspecting viewers. But Pitch Perfect 2 is an encore performed before a ravenously loyal crowd demanding to hear certain hits. It’s clear that everyone, including first-time director Elizabeth Banks, felt the pressure to obey the raised lighters in the audience and repeat certain notes, lest those lighters become torches and pitchforks.
Thursday, May 28,2015

watch this!

When stage director Len Barron set out to produce his original play telling the stories of world-renowned physicists, he decided to cast eight grandmothers.
Thursday, May 28,2015

Watch

If you’ve ever found yourself curious about the practice of ultrarunning, running beyond 26.2 miles, look no further than Run Free. This documentary recounts the life of ultrarunning pioneer and Boulder native Micah True.
Thursday, May 28,2015

Make way for yesterday

Silent cinema is going strong at Chautauqua Auditorium

By Michael J. Casey
The movies started small. So small that only one person at a time could watch them. The year was 1892, and Thomas Edison and his colleague William Kennedy Laurie Dickson discovered that if you spun sequential photographs in a small box, you could create the illusion of movement. Edison called them Kinetoscopes, and these viewing booths were the iPhones of their day, a private experience where patrons paid to watch short movies of a giddy girl kissing a mustachioed man, of a dancer swirling her dress and of a weightlifter flexing his muscles.
Thursday, May 21,2015

Men ruin everything

Yes, ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ is as good as you’ve heard%u2028

By Ryan Syrek
This isn’t to say that the film isn’t speaking volumes. Hell, it’s not even speaking: it’s shouting and screaming over a wailing guitar riff. The brides scrawl graffiti in the dungeon they escaped, reading “We are not things” and “Who killed the world?” The latter has a clear answer: Dudes.
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