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Danish Plan

Putin and anti-fracking activism

By Paul Danish

Harold Hamm, the multibillionaire oilman who is president of Continental Resources, the company that is the biggest player in North Dakota’s Bakken shale oil patch, raised some eyebrows last week when he said the Russians were financing the anti-fracking movement in the United States.

Danish Plan

Obama’s happy dance with Iran

By Paul Danish

The agreement will allow Iran to keep most of its existing nuclear infrastructure, which is approaching the size and scope of the Manhattan Project’s, with America’s blessing — while imposing flaccid limits on the number of uranium enrichment...

Danish Plan

Boulder needs a municipal oil company

By Paul Danish

Many Boulder residents chafe under the tyranny of Big Oil, which supplies the gasoline, natural gas and asphalt in the Whole Foods parking lot on which their survival depends. But fortunately, there is a way to rescue the city from the talons of Big Oil. (Just as all babies are beautiful, all dogs are good and all bicyclists are Little Lord Fauntleroys, all oil companies are Big.) Anyway, if you can’t lick ‘em, join ‘em. Boulder should start its own oil company.

Danish Plan

Enough!

By Paul Danish

“It is long past time to hold polluters responsible for their failures. The public is time and again asked to shoulder the burden of toxic spills occurring as a result of carelessness, ignorance, shoddy workmanship or cutting of corners in service of the bottom.

Danish Plan

Real tax reform means everyone pays something

By Paul Danish

Obama’s proposals emphasize income redistribution. He wants to raise taxes on the wealthy and give tax breaks to the middle class and to the working poor, the last through expanding eligibility for the earned income tax credit, among other things..

Danish Plan

The dark horses of 2016

By Paul Danish

Polls and pundits have been making all sorts of assumptions about the 2016 cycle: That Hillary Clinton is an oddson bet to be the Democrat if she chooses to run, that if Elizabeth Warren were the candidate, she would run like a latter-day George...

Danish Plan

My persons of the year

By Paul Danish

The Person of the Year award — called the Man of the Year award when it was begun in 1927 (Charles Lindberg was the first recipient) — was originally intended to recognize the person who “for better or for worse ... has done the most to influence the events of the year.

Danish Plan

Blacks, police and marijuana

By Paul Danish

Human Services, who serve at the pleasure of the president) the power to add or remove drugs from the list of drugs regulated by the act, or to move them among the five regulatory categories (or “Schedules”) under which drugs covered by the act are listed.

Danish Plan

GMOs: Boulder County’s November surprise

By Paul Danish

Every Democrat on the ballot in Boulder County won in Boulder County. Mark Udall and John Hickenlooper each got more than two-thirds of the votes cast in their races in Boulder County. Jared Polis got more than three-fourths. Almost all of the proposals involving tax increases in Boulder County and Boulder County cities passed.

Danish Plan

Driving to ban drilling

By Paul Danish

But the hypocrisy is beside the point. The real point is that even people who want to ban oil and gas drilling can’t live without it.

Dodge's Bullets

Letting go of my hump day

By Jefferson Dodge

After nearly two years at the weekly Clear Creek Courant, a year at the Summit Daily News, 12 years at the CU faculty/staff newspaper Silver & Gold Record and four and half years at Boulder Weekly, I’m taking a job as communications coordinator for Colorado State University.

Dodge's Bullets

Some Colorado politicians still do not get that whole open records thing

By Jefferson Dodge

Election reform activist Marilyn Marks, who has exposed many untoward practices — like using ballots that can be traced back to individual voters — got dragged into court by Broomfield officials after she had the gall to ask for public election records, including voted ballots.

Dodge's Bullets

Grappling with preserving the past, for the future

By Jefferson Dodge

I had to write about a subject that is near and dear to my heart again, and I never quite know how to handle it. It is the now-defunct faculty/ staff newspaper for the University of Colorado, Silver & Gold Record, where I worked for 12 years.

Dodge's Bullets

The flood and the faces that matter

By Jefferson Dodge

Over the past dozen years, living in Longmont’s Southmoor Park, I’ve gone on lots of walks and bike rides with my kids on the path that runs along Left Hand Creek, which is about two blocks from our house.

Dodge's Bullets

One step closer

By Jefferson Dodge

When my dear friend Bonnie Lloyd gave opening remarks at a private ceremony April 30 before she and her partner, Pattea Carpenter, obtained one of the first civil-union licenses issued by Boulder County, she thanked us. She thanked the small group of close friends for treating her and Pattea as “normal,” for not treating them as a lesbian couple.

Dodge's Bullets

Papers, please: An attempt to infiltrate a closed meeting of a Boulder County board

By Jefferson Dodge

One key role of the press is to serve as the eyes and ears of the public at open meetings. After all, most folks have jobs and families and better things to do than sit through a boring county commissioners hearing or city council study session.

Dodge's Bullets

CU staff retire, double-dip, get paid, oh my!

By Jefferson Dodge

Yet another CU administrator has been “double-dipping,” we at Boulder Weekly have learned. And it’s not that big of deal. A bigger deal is how these things have been communicated. Much has been made lately about University of Colorado Boulder administrators, their tuition-funded salary increases and their ability to retire and get rehired — “double-dipping” by receiving their pension and a salary.

Dodge's Bullets

Save journalism education at CU

By Jefferson Dodge

I've noticed that CU officials are fond of saying that "discontinuance is an unfortunate term" when they talk about the closure of the J-School. (And even though a committee is still considering that closure, I think it's a done deal - they just have to study it for a few months to preserve the deliberative spirit of the university.

Dodge's Bullets

A regent race that actually matters

By Jefferson Dodge

Currently, the board is controlled by Republicans, 5-4. Three positions are up for election this November, and two of those seats are expected to stay with their current parties, given political dynamics in the First and Fourth Congressional Districts.

Dodge's Bullets

A wake-up call

By Jefferson Dodge

After all, most of us lead fairly secure, soft, comfortable lives, especially compared to people in Third World countries hell, even compared to parts of the United States.

DyerTimes

Deception, the shared value of both parties

By Joel Dyer

There’s a downside to being the editor of a newspaper. It seems like every political organization in the state — including front groups for both major parties — feels compelled to send me its 10 favorite press releases every single day including Sundays and holidays.

DyerTimes

The collapse of compassion

By Joel Dyer

Anne Harper and her family, along with their 14 or so neighbors, have a serious problem. The place they care about most, their home, is about to be changed forever and not in a good way.

DyerTimes

End municipalization secrecy

By Joel Dyer

That said, I continue to be disappointed by the way that the City of Boulder conducts itself on this important issue — in particular its disregard for transparency, which seems to indicate that City Council and staff don’t think the people of Boulder can be trusted to understand complicated facts and make informed decisions.

DyerTimes

DyerTimes

Affordable housing vs. mass transit

By Joel Dyer

My suggested fix 20 years ago didn’t go over real well with a lot of people. I recommended that if the city were serious about economic diversity and affordable housing it should put several thousand mobile homes on open space and make them rent con trolled.

DyerTimes

The rise of the green-talking climate change deniers

By Joel Dyer

We hear it all the time: “climate denier.” We spit the term like a swear word at the Koch brothers or countless Republican politicians. It’s a label we attach to oil and gas industry executives, coal barons and those who run our power generation plants. But what does it really mean to be a climate denier?

DyerTimes

Don't take the bait

Longmont Council appeals fracking ban decision, but beware Finley’s invitation

By Joel Dyer

You may recall that Tuesday’s vote was necessitated by Boulder County District Court Judge D.D. Mallard’s ruling in July that found Longmont didn’t have the authority to ban hydraulic fracturing within its city limits because the state was in charge...

DyerTimes

Behind the Polis Betrayal

By Joel Dyer

Well, the first mistake Colorado citizens made was they trusted a politician, Congressman Jared Polis, to help them with their cause.

DyerTimes

Fracking activists are the Tea Party of the Left?

Denver Post doing its part for the oil and gas industry’s disinformation campaign

By Joel Dyer

I’ve been waiting for the oil and gas industry to make this lame “Ralph Nader” argument to try to scare moderates. I just thought they would wait until mid October to trot it out.

DyerTimes

In the real world, playing politics on immigration is a lot like murder

By Joel Dyer

Without anyone saying a word, we began to slowly move to our left trying our best not make a sound as we bend low and make our way along a faint trail that disappears into the manzanita and chaparral.

DyerTimes

The Polis/Hickenlooper fracking compromise; thanks, but no thanks

By Joel Dyer

Apparently Congressman Jared Polis wants to reenact it at the state capital by way of Governor John Hickenlooper’s proposed special legislative session that could come as soon as June 8 and will aim to keep local control over oil and gas development off the ballot this fall.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examined the genomes of 825 white American couples, finding fewer differences in DNA between married people than randomly-selected individuals.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Austin Stewart, an assistant professor at Iowa State University, has created a virtual reality universe for chickens called Second Livestock. Yes, that’s a play on the Second Life virtual reality game where people become oddball avatars and socialize and flit about.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

“When the Colorado Symphony accepted support from the legal cannabis industry — as a means of supporting our financial operations and connecting with a culturally diverse audience — we believed we did so in full compliance with the law,” the CSO says.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

If you’re an expert science journo, you just might appear on Fox News’ Fox & Friends to opine about all things futuristic, like Google’s robot cars, gene therapy and how we’ll all be traveling in spaceships one day. Just don’t bring up climate change. That’s what Michael Moyer, an editor for Scientific American, learned last week. Asked what tops his crystal-ball-gazing list beforehand, he told a show producer “climate change.” That’s apparently not a good subject in Foxland.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Pot made national headlines — again — in the past week. This time it was remarks by Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper that grabbed much of the attention. Ol’ Hick stood up to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Christie’s opinion that our beautiful state’s fledgling marijuana industry isn’t the kind of “quality of life” that he’d wish for in Jersey.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

COLORADO 12TH IN THE NATION FOR INCREASING STUDENT DEBT TWITTER BUYS GNIP BOULDER CRACKS CODE FOR HUMOR, BUT NOT TOP 50 ROBOTS GO TO WORK ON FLOOD

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Senate Bill 181 eeked past a committee this week amid protests from police chiefs and the Colorado Municipal League that the cameras reduce accidents. But lawmakers on both sides of the aisle in both chambers are critical of the cameras, wary that they generate revenues for cities at the expense of their citizenry.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

And it seems that even if the salmon is approved, the company will face an upstream fight in winning the hearts of consumers. Kroger, which runs King Soopers stores, Trader Joe’s, Safeway and Target are just the latest grocers to join a long list of those refusing to stock the fish on its shelves.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Child poverty. Virtual reality. Tumbleweeds. Its everything you might have missed this in this week's news.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

News from the week of March 20

Scientists see the Big Bang and Detroit discovers more than 100 serial rapists.

Letters

LETTERS

As is always the case, Mr. Danish starts his arguments with his own POV and then searches for information to support it. This is the failure of lazy narrow-minded ideologues. They don’t wish to engage complex issues with as many “facts” as possible. They find a nugget of information to support their theory and disregard anything that competes with it.

Letters

Letters

In recent weeks, Republicans have embarked upon a desperate campaign of character assassination of President Obama: a senile Rudy Giuliani said President Obama did not love America; Republicans invited Netanyahu to speak before Congress and in the latest affront, Republicans have sent a treasonous letter to Iran.

Letters

LETTERS

After becoming aware of last week’s Stew’s Views column [Re: “Ladies and gentlemen, not the Grateful Dead,” March 5], “Fare Thee Well” promoter Peter Shapiro called me and we chatted for the better part of an hour about the issues raised in the article.

Letters

LETTERS | Week of November 13

Danish misses the point, the election was bought, and public employees deserve better. Itīs this week in letters.

Letters

LETTERS

Response to BWīs fracking expose and readerīs views on the upcoming election.

Letters

Letters

Fracking in our back yards and diplomacy in Iran; itīs letters from the week of July 24.

Letters

LETTERS

Get the people into fracking prevention and the government out of mosquito prevention; itīs this week in letters.

Letters

Monsanto, miRagen response to last week’s BW ‘Muzzled by Monsanto story’

Just to be absolutely clear, miRagen’s sole motivation for conducting the studies in collaboration with Monsanto was to help determine if plants could provide an important new technology for the oral delivery of RNA-based human therapeutics and therapeutic foods.

Letters

LETTERS | week of March 27

This week we published letters regarding Oil & Gas ballot measures, Frozen Dead Guy Days, Boulder County Coroner Emma Hall, Macon Cowlesī love of animals vs love of homeless people, a search for an artist.

Letters

LETTERS

It's time to fire Danish, fracking is a travesty and the KKK were Democrats; Letters to Boulder Weekly for the week of March 20.

Perspectives

Facing a crossroads

By Gary Swing

Climate change is happening now as a result of human industrial activity. Petrochemical agriculture threatens our health, food security and the environment. The livestock industry contributes to global warming, land degradation and air and water pollution.

Perspectives

Boulder County Democrats in conflict

By Dave Anderson

Among progressives, people hyperventilate about whether to vote for the Democrat or some third party candidate.

Perspectives

Bowl a strike for reproductive freedom

National Abortion Access Fund Bowl-a-Thon event fundraises for low-income access to abortion

By Dave Anderson

Everybody knows abortion became legal for all women with the ‘Roe v. Wade’ Supreme Court decision in 1973. Fewer people know that in 1976, poor women lost that fundamental right to determine whether or when to have children.

Perspectives

Paying to pump

Missing oil and gas severance tax revenue

By Dave Anderson

Colorado’s opportunities lie in tight sands and shale formations — especially the oil-rich Niobrara shale. Niobrara may hold a reserve the equivalent of as much as 2 billion barrels of oil, according to industry estimates.

Perspectives

Potholes in the road to privatization

By Dave Anderson

Studies show that privatization tends to cost more and provide lower quality services than the government.

Perspectives

Seeger’s true politics

By Dave Anderson

Folk singer Pete Seeger, who died at age 94 last month, provided a soundtrack for every progressive crusade of our time. Many obituaries have called him a “Stalinist,” but the label is somewhat misleading

Perspectives

ALEC’s attack on renewables arrives in Colorado

By Dave Anderson

America’s solar industry supplies less than 1 percent of the electricity in the U.S. but has experienced explosive growth. Unfortunately, there’s growing opposition from the utilities. A recent study by utilities think tank the Edison Electric Institute candidly says solar power is a future threat to the utilities.

Perspectives

Passing the TPP: Not so fast

By Dave Anderson

There isn’t any significant split over foreign policy or social issues. Now Democrats are divided over economics.

Perspectives

Stand up for Walmart workers

By Dave Anderson

Courageous Walmart workers have been striking and committing civil disobedience around the country.

Perspectives

It's time to open the vault on Kennedy

By Dave Anderson

President John Kennedy was killed 50 years ago. There is still considerable controversy about who did it. The release of 4 million pages of long-secret documents since Oliver Stone’s movie JFK clarified some disputes but raised new questions. Many thousands of pages are still secret.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

I recently started dating a girl who likes to be submissive. It’s more of a psychological thing than a pain thing. She opened up about her kink, and I was all for it, thinking myself the ultimate GGG lover. Thing is, I find being a Dom quite boring. I love getting her off, but I just can’t get into the role.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

She’s perfect. In her late teens and early 20s, she had a wild sex life. She attended sex parties, had loads of NSA hookups, sexted with random guys she met online, etc. She revealed this to me slowly and carefully out of fear that I’d look down on her, but what she didn’t know is that I have an intense cuckold interest.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

When I was 15, I had a three-month-long sexual relationship with a 32-year-old woman. She was a friend of the family, and my parents were going through a divorce. I stayed with her for the summer, and she initiated a sexual relationship. Looking back, I can see that she had been grooming me.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

My boyfriend and I have been together three years. We plan to start a family, we are very happy together, we go on many adventures together — all that good stuff. For the past year or so, I feel like I’ve been losing my sex drive. Not just toward him but in general.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

Shame on you for recommending adultery as a solution to a husband who can’t satisfy his wife! Satisfying a woman is easy! I learned it from a book! You just tickle the clitoris continuously with as light a touch as possible until she comes, as many times as you like.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

My father is 65 years old and has been a devoted husband to my mother who has been battling a medical condition for the past 30 years — a condition that prevents her from engaging in sexual activity of any kind. He has not had sex in all this time and is desperately frustrated.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

“Sexual arousal is very good at diverting us from things we’re bothered by,” Dr. Ley says. “For many people, that’s fine, and it works great to let off steam. But if you’re not taking care of the real issue — loneliness, depression, stress — then the porn use can sometimes become its own problem.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

My husband and I are a straight couple in our early 50s, and we’ve been married for more than 30 years. We were raised to wait for sex till we got married — this was back in the early ’80s — and we did. Our wedding night was pretty disappointing since neither of us knew what we were doing.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

and I was wondering if it’s safe for me to use it in both my ass and my cunt. I would clean it in between uses/orifices, of course, and it has a flared base, so it’s safe for anal play. Can I do this or do I need to get separate toys for ass and cunt?.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

I’m a straight 18-year-old girl in my first sexual relationship. Things are a little awkward, and I could chalk it up to inexperience, but here’s what I feel conflicted about: I have a vore fetish. It was a fascination for me as a young child and became a sexual thing around the time I hit puberty.

Stew's Views

Ladies and gentlemen, not the Grateful Dead

By Stewart Sallo

It has been almost 20 years since legendary Grateful Dead lead guitarist Jerry Garcia transitioned to the big acid test in the sky. And since Jerry left us the debate has raged over whether the remaining members of the band — Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart — could call themselves the Grateful Dead. That question was answered definitively with a resounding “NO” this past weekend as some 500,000 fans logged on to the Ticketmaster website in an attempt to purchase tickets to the “Fare Thee Well” shows, scheduled for July 3-5 at Soldier Field in Chicago. You heard it here first: Even if these shows go down as the greatest in the history of rock and roll, this is not the Grateful Dead.

Stew's Views

Can a business do well and do good?

(or even because it does good)

By Stewart Sallo

As we pass another milestone in the Boulder Weekly journey — this one with a big 21 prominently displayed — I have a confession to make about this newspaper that has never been shared with our readers: Boulder Weekly is a corporation. You read that right: a corporation. And I’m not talking about a nonprofit corporation (although, believe me, there have been times in the not-too-distant past where the term “nonprofit” would have been hitting the nail squarely on the head).

Stew's Views

Why the 'Weekly' makes political endorsements

By Stewart Sallo

We all need trusted, authoritative sources to help us make our decisions, and, while there is no guarantee that accessing these sources will result in a good decision being made, chances are that on the whole our decisions will work out better when they are made after careful consideration and with reliable information in hand.

Stew's Views

The work that makes a difference

By Stewart Sallo

Over the course of almost 20 years and 1,000 editions, hundreds of talented individuals have worked for Boulder Weekly.

Stew's Views

Jerry Garcia’s 70th

By Stewart Sallo

Every life is a story. And every story requires a soundtrack. For life is a sensual experience, and among the senses, the sounds — and, particularly, the music — that accompany life’s experiences provide a context that enriches and completes them.

Stew's Views

4/20 smoke-screen

By Stewart Sallo

There are so many angles from which to contemplate the wrong that CU is perpetrating with respect to its tactics to end the “4/20 smokeout” that one hardly knows where to begin.

Stew's Views

A better time, a better hero

By Stewart Sallo

But despite the strength and power that he displayed at the plate, Killebrew exemplified a humble and gentle demeanor that has been all but lost in a modern era of baseball that is rife with ill-behaved, overpaid, egomaniacal athletes. Babe Ruth was a womanizer; Mickey Mantle was an alcoholic; Pete Rose was a gambler; Barry Bonds cheated with steroids. But Harmon Killebrew was the kind of heroic role model that every 8-year-old boy needs and deserves...

Stew's Views

Bikes and 'boarders

By Stewart Sallo

In the interest of full disclosure, I am an avid mountain biker. I enjoy riding several times a week, weather permitting, and for me that includes temperatures as low as 40 degrees, so long as the trails are clear and rideable with no residual damage. I have been known to get up at the crack of dawn, sneak away from the office in the middle of the day or hit the trails after work, rushing home for dinner after dark to the disapproving.

Stew's Views

He moved me brightly

By Stewart Sallo

About 40 seconds into a 1967 CBS TV documentary about the thengrowing Hippie movement in San Franciscos Haight-Ashbury District (http:// tinyurl.com/2wvzjqq), a youthful, unbearded Jerry Garcia makes his first appearance.

Stew's Views

Dear readers, supporters and community partners:

By Stewart Sallo

As we bid goodbye to 2009 and set our sights not only on a new year but a new decade, I would like to share with you some of what has happened during the past year at Boulder's only independent newspaper, as well as what you can expect to see from us in the coming year.

The Highroad

Why are we taxpayers subsidizing corporate crime?

By Jim Hightower

Even the corporate crimes that produce horrible injuries, illnesses, death, etc. are routinely settled by fines and payoffs from the corporate treasury, with no punishment of the hon chos who oversee what amount to crime-for-profit syndicates.

The Highroad

Big Food trying a big hoax

By Jim Hightower

The good news is that more and more businesses across the country are adopting this attitude, providing a buylocal, un-corporate, anti-chain alternative for customers.

The Highroad

A supreme political fraud to gut Obamacare

By Jim Hightower

they’ve been harmed by the health care law. Thus, David King, a 64-year-old Vietnam vet, was recruited to be the lead plaintiff in King v. Burwell, which is now in the Supreme Court’s hands. He and three co-plaintiffs were chosen to put sympathetic human faces on what essentially is a right-wing political ploy.

The Highroad

GOP lets corporate lobbyists take over Congress

By Jim Hightower

Oh, wait… my mistake. Members now have staffs to do all that, including telling the esteemed legislators how to vote. Few people are aware that con gressional staffs have mushroomed and gained far-reaching control over legislation.

The Highroad

Debt buyers bury hard-hit consumers in lies

By Jim Hightower

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman found that Encore, based in San Diego, filed nearly 240,000 lawsuits against debtors in a recent four-year period, using our courts as its private collection arm. Problem is, Encore’s bulk filing of lawsuits are rife with errors, out-ofdate payment data, fabricated credit card statements, etc.

The Highroad

Reclaim Chicago challenges ‘Mayor 1-Percent’

By Jim Hightower

The people of Chicago are presently grappling with a big question that nearly every urban place faces: Can anyone really govern such a sprawling, brawling city? Reclaim Chicago — an upstart populist coalition that has become a major force in the city — says the answer is a great big “NO.” Moreover, asserts this grassroots group, no one should. Rather, the many should, and if they’re organized through a democratic network, the people can be their own government, producing egalitarian policies that improve the lives of everyone, advancing the whole city.

The Highroad

Aetna lifts the national standard for ‘competitive wages’

By Jim Hightower

good. That selfish ethos is what prevails in today’s corporate suites, where it’s claimed that the only responsibility of executives is to maximize profits for the “family” — i.e., themselves and major shareholders. Idiotes are free to stiff workers, sidestep environmental rules, shaft consumers, etc.

The Highroad

Explaining congressional morality

By Jim Hightower

It’s always interesting to see Congress in action — though “interesting” can also be appalling. For example, what a sight it is to watch Republican leaders as they gleefully try to repeal Obamacare — the law extending health care coverage to all Americans.

The Highroad

Death of the lush, green lawn

By Jim Hightower

“High,” as everyone called him, was dedicated, body and soul, to the Sisyphean task of trying to maintain a lawn full of lush St. Augustine grass in hot, dry Texas. He planted, watered, fertilized, watered, mowed, watered, fought bugs and brown patch, watered, re-planted, watered… ad nauseum.

The Highroad

New GOP Congress rushes big favors to Wall Street

By Jim Hightower

If members of the brand-spanking new, Republican-controlled Congress are at all confused about why We the People consider them just another load of bovine excrement, they should look at their bill called “Promoting Job Creation and Reducing Small Business Burdens.

Weed Between the Lines

State cannabis campaign based on information, not retribution

By Leland Rucker

Have you seen the Good to Know Colorado marijuana ads on television? They use colorful cartoon characters, whimsical illustrations and a friendly, folksy voice that offers basic information about legalization. “Instead of telling you what you can’t do, we’re going to tell you what you can do, too.

Weed Between the Lines

The cannabis debate drifts into the halls of Congress

By Leland Rucker

Last week I wrote about a bill that was then being debated in the Utah state legislature. S.B. 259 would have amended a law passed last year that allowed Utah citizens to use certain strains of CBD-dominate cannabis to treat medical conditions but mandated no legal way that patients could obtain them.

Weed Between the Lines

Buzzed bunnies: The last spurts of ‘Reefer Madness’

By Leland Rucker

The headlines were everywhere. “DEA Warns of Stoned Rabbits if Utah Passes Medical Marijuana” was over a story in The Washington Post. A search for “cannabis bunnies Utah” yielded page after page of rewrites of that same tale with variant headlines about small mammals in THC ecstasy. Buzzed bunnies? Washington Post? WTF?

Weed Between the Lines

Boulder profits from first year of legal cannabis

By Leland Rucker

The Colorado Department of Revenue released a comprehensive report on its first year of retail cannabis operations. It’s probably not as compelling as the latest cat video, but it’s pretty fascinating if you’re interested in seeing how legal marijuana actually fared its first year.

Weed Between the Lines

Safe Streets Alliance wants cannabis back with criminals

By Leland Rucker

About the time you think things couldn’t get any crazier in the American crazyquilt approach to cannabis: Last Thursday two lawsuits were filed against the state of Colorado to shut down legal marijuana, alleging that all legal marijuana businesses are illegal under the federal racketeering act. The next day, two U.S. congressmen introduced bills that would set up a regulatory approach to cannabis on a federal level.

Weed Between the Lines

CU researchers find no correlation between cannabis and brain changes

By Leland Rucker

One of the main cannabis prohibition memes these days is based around some recent studies that suggest that cannabis use produces physical changes in the brain. This one really caught fire after The Journal of Neuroscience published research last spring from a Harvard/Northwestern report that scanned the brains of 40 students, half who used cannabis and half who didn’t, and found volume, shape and density changes in two brain areas involved with emotion and motivation.

Weed Between the Lines

The Obama drug war budget and the definition of insanity

By Leland Rucker

The words were encouraging, especially coming from the surgeon general of the United States. “We have some preliminary data showing that for certain medical conditions and symptoms that marijuana can be helpful.

Weed Between the Lines

State health report looks at the negatives of cannabis use

By Leland Rucker

“Monitoring Health Concerns Related to Marijuana in Colorado: 2014 Changes in Marijuana Use Patterns, Systematic Literature Review, and Possible Marijuana-Related Health Effects” is mandated as part of Senate Bill 13-283, which demanded a health report to be finished at the end of January 2015 and updated every two years.

Weed Between the Lines

Wyoming keeps cannabis possession criminal

By Leland Rucker

But not all state legislators are ready to make that move. In a floor vote last week, the Wyoming house killed Bill 49. Sponsor Jim Byrd, a Cheyenne Democrat, wanted the state to turn cannabis possession cases into civil offenses: Fine anybody with up to a half ounce $50 and anybody with a half ounce to an ounce $100.

Weed Between the Lines

Creating a national cannabis brand might be harder than you think

By Leland Rucker

I ran across several stories about Bethenny Frankel, a reality show personality, who, after apparently being spotted coming out of an Aspen dispensary and tweeting her delight at the experience, is rumored to be wanting to cash in on the cannabis business.

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