Find Local Events (pick a date)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Danish Plan

Shakespeare, like youth, is wasted on the young. Or is it?

By Paul Danish

“I am not supposed to dislike Shakespeare. But I do. And not only do I dislike Shakespeare because of my own personal disinterest in reading stories written in an early form of the English Language that I cannot always easily navigate, but also...

Danish Plan

2016 and the demographics of social issues

By Paul Danish

The poll found that for the first time since Gallup began asking the question in 1999, the number of Americans who self-identified as “social liberals” equaled the number of self-identified as “social conservatives;” each group weighed in at 31 percent.

Danish Plan

Obama’s silly speech

By Paul Danish

At a time when Islamic militants are rampaging all over the Middle East, in no small part due to Obama’s incompetent military and foreign policy decisionmaking, and in the same week that the cities of Ramadi in Iraq and Palmyra in Syria fell to...

Danish Plan

The return of the ferret

By Paul Danish

One reason the feds are hot to turn the Arsenal into a pied-a-terre for the pieds noirs is because of the ferrets’ fondness for prairie dog. Each ferret is expected to eat between 100 and 150 prairie dogs a year (16,000 to 24,000 for 160 ferrets) according to refuge manager Dave Lucas.

Danish Plan

The campaign to pass the Danish Plan

By Paul Danish

The campaign to pass the Danish Plan began in August 1976 with a panicked phone call to me from Councilwoman and future Mayor Ruth Correll. She wanted to know why the Danish Plan (officially called the Slow Growth ordinance) didn’t exempt affordable housing from its growth limits.

Danish Plan

The road to the Danish Plan

By Paul Danish

It would be wrong to say that Boulder wasn’t concerned about growth until 1971. In the 1950s and 1960s Boulder was plenty concerned about growth — specifically about how to get more of it. And over the next 20 years, Boulder got the growth it wanted — good and hard.

Danish Plan

The Danish Plan recalled

By Paul Danish

Participants in Boulder’s current conversation about growth are starting to allude to the Danish Plan, the growth control ordinance I wrote in 1976 that was adopted by a vote of the people in the November election that year, so I thought I’d provide some background on it — starting with what it said and didn’t say.

Danish Plan

Boulder’s insane densification

By Paul Danish

The council’s land use and development decisions, motivated by a mindless, delusional obsession with affordable housing (whatever that is) and sustainability (whatever that means) has led to an explosion of dense, ugly development that is destroying...

Danish Plan

How to provide higher learning at a lower price

By Paul Danish

In the 17th and 18th centuries, indentured servitude was your ticket to America if you couldn’t afford a ticket. And most folks couldn’t — because passage to America back then cost the equivalent of about seven years’ wages.

Danish Plan

Putin and anti-fracking activism

By Paul Danish

Harold Hamm, the multibillionaire oilman who is president of Continental Resources, the company that is the biggest player in North Dakota’s Bakken shale oil patch, raised some eyebrows last week when he said the Russians were financing the anti-fracking movement in the United States.

Dodge's Bullets

Letting go of my hump day

By Jefferson Dodge

After nearly two years at the weekly Clear Creek Courant, a year at the Summit Daily News, 12 years at the CU faculty/staff newspaper Silver & Gold Record and four and half years at Boulder Weekly, I’m taking a job as communications coordinator for Colorado State University.

Dodge's Bullets

Some Colorado politicians still do not get that whole open records thing

By Jefferson Dodge

Election reform activist Marilyn Marks, who has exposed many untoward practices — like using ballots that can be traced back to individual voters — got dragged into court by Broomfield officials after she had the gall to ask for public election records, including voted ballots.

Dodge's Bullets

Grappling with preserving the past, for the future

By Jefferson Dodge

I had to write about a subject that is near and dear to my heart again, and I never quite know how to handle it. It is the now-defunct faculty/ staff newspaper for the University of Colorado, Silver & Gold Record, where I worked for 12 years.

Dodge's Bullets

The flood and the faces that matter

By Jefferson Dodge

Over the past dozen years, living in Longmont’s Southmoor Park, I’ve gone on lots of walks and bike rides with my kids on the path that runs along Left Hand Creek, which is about two blocks from our house.

Dodge's Bullets

One step closer

By Jefferson Dodge

When my dear friend Bonnie Lloyd gave opening remarks at a private ceremony April 30 before she and her partner, Pattea Carpenter, obtained one of the first civil-union licenses issued by Boulder County, she thanked us. She thanked the small group of close friends for treating her and Pattea as “normal,” for not treating them as a lesbian couple.

Dodge's Bullets

Papers, please: An attempt to infiltrate a closed meeting of a Boulder County board

By Jefferson Dodge

One key role of the press is to serve as the eyes and ears of the public at open meetings. After all, most folks have jobs and families and better things to do than sit through a boring county commissioners hearing or city council study session.

Dodge's Bullets

CU staff retire, double-dip, get paid, oh my!

By Jefferson Dodge

Yet another CU administrator has been “double-dipping,” we at Boulder Weekly have learned. And it’s not that big of deal. A bigger deal is how these things have been communicated. Much has been made lately about University of Colorado Boulder administrators, their tuition-funded salary increases and their ability to retire and get rehired — “double-dipping” by receiving their pension and a salary.

Dodge's Bullets

Save journalism education at CU

By Jefferson Dodge

I've noticed that CU officials are fond of saying that "discontinuance is an unfortunate term" when they talk about the closure of the J-School. (And even though a committee is still considering that closure, I think it's a done deal - they just have to study it for a few months to preserve the deliberative spirit of the university.

Dodge's Bullets

A regent race that actually matters

By Jefferson Dodge

Currently, the board is controlled by Republicans, 5-4. Three positions are up for election this November, and two of those seats are expected to stay with their current parties, given political dynamics in the First and Fourth Congressional Districts.

Dodge's Bullets

A wake-up call

By Jefferson Dodge

After all, most of us lead fairly secure, soft, comfortable lives, especially compared to people in Third World countries hell, even compared to parts of the United States.

DyerTimes

Smart Track? We’re not that stupid

By Joel Dyer

What does Smart Track have in common with the Brooklyn Bridge? They both get sold to suckers. First off, I apologize for writing this column. I really do. I feel guilty because writing this insinuates that I think there are people out there capable of reading this paper, voting or even reciting most of the alphabet who don’t already know that Smart Track and Fast Track are really the same thing.

DyerTimes

Development reality check

By Joel Dyer

I can’t remember how many times I’ve started off a column or news story with my favorite Harry S. Truman quote, but it’s happened a lot. There is just something about the short memory of Boulder County politicians and some residents that seems to keep it relevant.

DyerTimes

It’s past time for Polis to decide on fast track for TPP

By Joel Dyer

Some people just can’t make up their minds. Where should I eat? Blue or red? The Voice or Dancing with the Stars? Obviously, indecision on the part of most people doesn’t have much significance for the rest of us, but that’s not true of everyone. When Congressman Jared Polis is indecisive, you better take cover. History tells us bad things happen when he struggles to make a decision on something until the last minute.

DyerTimes

Deception, the shared value of both parties

By Joel Dyer

There’s a downside to being the editor of a newspaper. It seems like every political organization in the state — including front groups for both major parties — feels compelled to send me its 10 favorite press releases every single day including Sundays and holidays.

DyerTimes

The collapse of compassion

By Joel Dyer

Anne Harper and her family, along with their 14 or so neighbors, have a serious problem. The place they care about most, their home, is about to be changed forever and not in a good way.

DyerTimes

End municipalization secrecy

By Joel Dyer

That said, I continue to be disappointed by the way that the City of Boulder conducts itself on this important issue — in particular its disregard for transparency, which seems to indicate that City Council and staff don’t think the people of Boulder can be trusted to understand complicated facts and make informed decisions.

DyerTimes

DyerTimes

Affordable housing vs. mass transit

By Joel Dyer

My suggested fix 20 years ago didn’t go over real well with a lot of people. I recommended that if the city were serious about economic diversity and affordable housing it should put several thousand mobile homes on open space and make them rent con trolled.

DyerTimes

The rise of the green-talking climate change deniers

By Joel Dyer

We hear it all the time: “climate denier.” We spit the term like a swear word at the Koch brothers or countless Republican politicians. It’s a label we attach to oil and gas industry executives, coal barons and those who run our power generation plants. But what does it really mean to be a climate denier?

DyerTimes

Don't take the bait

Longmont Council appeals fracking ban decision, but beware Finley’s invitation

By Joel Dyer

You may recall that Tuesday’s vote was necessitated by Boulder County District Court Judge D.D. Mallard’s ruling in July that found Longmont didn’t have the authority to ban hydraulic fracturing within its city limits because the state was in charge...

DyerTimes

Behind the Polis Betrayal

By Joel Dyer

Well, the first mistake Colorado citizens made was they trusted a politician, Congressman Jared Polis, to help them with their cause.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

But then, Wal-Mart says it’s not happy with the new law and those same lawmakers instantly decide that God’s opinion was never really all that important anyway compared to Wal-Mart’s opinion so now they are rewriting the law to make Wal-Mart and other corporations happy, presumably at God’s expense.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examined the genomes of 825 white American couples, finding fewer differences in DNA between married people than randomly-selected individuals.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Austin Stewart, an assistant professor at Iowa State University, has created a virtual reality universe for chickens called Second Livestock. Yes, that’s a play on the Second Life virtual reality game where people become oddball avatars and socialize and flit about.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

“When the Colorado Symphony accepted support from the legal cannabis industry — as a means of supporting our financial operations and connecting with a culturally diverse audience — we believed we did so in full compliance with the law,” the CSO says.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

If you’re an expert science journo, you just might appear on Fox News’ Fox & Friends to opine about all things futuristic, like Google’s robot cars, gene therapy and how we’ll all be traveling in spaceships one day. Just don’t bring up climate change. That’s what Michael Moyer, an editor for Scientific American, learned last week. Asked what tops his crystal-ball-gazing list beforehand, he told a show producer “climate change.” That’s apparently not a good subject in Foxland.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Pot made national headlines — again — in the past week. This time it was remarks by Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper that grabbed much of the attention. Ol’ Hick stood up to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Christie’s opinion that our beautiful state’s fledgling marijuana industry isn’t the kind of “quality of life” that he’d wish for in Jersey.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

COLORADO 12TH IN THE NATION FOR INCREASING STUDENT DEBT TWITTER BUYS GNIP BOULDER CRACKS CODE FOR HUMOR, BUT NOT TOP 50 ROBOTS GO TO WORK ON FLOOD

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Senate Bill 181 eeked past a committee this week amid protests from police chiefs and the Colorado Municipal League that the cameras reduce accidents. But lawmakers on both sides of the aisle in both chambers are critical of the cameras, wary that they generate revenues for cities at the expense of their citizenry.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

And it seems that even if the salmon is approved, the company will face an upstream fight in winning the hearts of consumers. Kroger, which runs King Soopers stores, Trader Joe’s, Safeway and Target are just the latest grocers to join a long list of those refusing to stock the fish on its shelves.

In Case You Missed It

In case you missed it

Child poverty. Virtual reality. Tumbleweeds. Its everything you might have missed this in this week's news.

Letters

LETTERS

We know older adults want to age in place; and there are benefits. Older adults remain in the community, in the familiarity of their own homes and, hopefully, near family and friends. Family is first to provide care (I did so with my mother) and doing so is often expensive.

Letters

LETTERS

The upcoming EPA Clean Power Plan can help us achieve a healthier relationship with the environment by reducing the contribution of our electricity system to global warming. Such a plan falls in line with the Pope’s moral desire to protect the planet we all share and the people we share it with.

Letters

LETTERS

Businesses in Eagle and Summit County support the bill because of the many benefits this protection will bring to their communities. These valuable lands are currently used for hunting, fishing, hiking, backpacking and horseback riding. The lands are threatened by extractive industries that want to mine or drill in these pristine areas.

Letters

LETTERS

I’ve been following the issue for some time, and last week the federal government and the EPA finalized a rule that would mend the loopholes in the Clean Water Act and help protect the streams and wetlands that fall into the gray area of the current form of the Act.

Letters

LETTERS

I grew up on an organic grain farm in Saskatchewan, and worked for five years as a USDA-contract organic inspector. But I left the organic movement when I realized it was all just a bureaucratic scam designed to propel a political agenda. Would you believe there’s no field testing in the organic sector? None.

Letters

LETTERS

I am still wary of the non-profit community being screwed on this deal. What Latino groups have you reached out to? What churches have you reached out to for suggestions? What does the human relations commission have to say about this deal? I fully expect the working people of this town to be shut out of use of this facility.

Letters

LETTERS

Put simply, TPP is a top-secret plan to hand enormous power to the world’s most powerful corporations. We know this because leaked texts show us what is in store for democracy, our future and the fate of the planet should TPP pass. If not for recent leaks of the TPP text, even Mr.

Letters

LETTERS

The policy, as proposed by Citizens’ Climate Lobby, includes three parts: A gradually increasing carbon fee, imposed at the point of extraction or import of fossil fuels, provides a price signal to the economy, enabling businesses and consumers to adjust gradually and unleashes American ingenuity to devise better low-carbon technologies.

Letters

LETTERS

Fast Track for the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) would be a disaster. It would transfer virtually all Congressional authority over the secret TPP to the president. Congress would be unable to offer amendments or ensure that the TPP benefits the American people.

Letters

LETTERS

issue, BW regrets that it made a mistake in the Pet Boarding category. The Divine Canine Pet Care Center at 2103 CO-42 in Louisville should have been listed in third place. In addition there was a tie for fifth place.

Perspectives

Facing a crossroads

By Gary Swing

Climate change is happening now as a result of human industrial activity. Petrochemical agriculture threatens our health, food security and the environment. The livestock industry contributes to global warming, land degradation and air and water pollution.

Perspectives

Boulder County Democrats in conflict

By Dave Anderson

Among progressives, people hyperventilate about whether to vote for the Democrat or some third party candidate.

Perspectives

Bowl a strike for reproductive freedom

National Abortion Access Fund Bowl-a-Thon event fundraises for low-income access to abortion

By Dave Anderson

Everybody knows abortion became legal for all women with the ‘Roe v. Wade’ Supreme Court decision in 1973. Fewer people know that in 1976, poor women lost that fundamental right to determine whether or when to have children.

Perspectives

Paying to pump

Missing oil and gas severance tax revenue

By Dave Anderson

Colorado’s opportunities lie in tight sands and shale formations — especially the oil-rich Niobrara shale. Niobrara may hold a reserve the equivalent of as much as 2 billion barrels of oil, according to industry estimates.

Perspectives

Potholes in the road to privatization

By Dave Anderson

Studies show that privatization tends to cost more and provide lower quality services than the government.

Perspectives

Seeger’s true politics

By Dave Anderson

Folk singer Pete Seeger, who died at age 94 last month, provided a soundtrack for every progressive crusade of our time. Many obituaries have called him a “Stalinist,” but the label is somewhat misleading

Perspectives

ALEC’s attack on renewables arrives in Colorado

By Dave Anderson

America’s solar industry supplies less than 1 percent of the electricity in the U.S. but has experienced explosive growth. Unfortunately, there’s growing opposition from the utilities. A recent study by utilities think tank the Edison Electric Institute candidly says solar power is a future threat to the utilities.

Perspectives

Passing the TPP: Not so fast

By Dave Anderson

There isn’t any significant split over foreign policy or social issues. Now Democrats are divided over economics.

Perspectives

Stand up for Walmart workers

By Dave Anderson

Courageous Walmart workers have been striking and committing civil disobedience around the country.

Perspectives

It's time to open the vault on Kennedy

By Dave Anderson

President John Kennedy was killed 50 years ago. There is still considerable controversy about who did it. The release of 4 million pages of long-secret documents since Oliver Stone’s movie JFK clarified some disputes but raised new questions. Many thousands of pages are still secret.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

Dear Dan: This is going to sound like bragging, but my appearance is intrinsic to my kink. I’m a gay male gymnast. Most of the guys on my college team are annoyed by the kind of objectification we routinely come in for. (We actually don’t want to be auctioned off at yet another sorority fundraiser, thanks.

Savage Love

Savage Love

By Dan Savage

I am a male grad student who is technically engaged to a female grad student. She has numerous positive qualities, but she is repulsed by sex. She is very sensitive about her repulsion and becomes distraught when I broach the subject. She says that even the thought of doing anything sexual with me elicits a panic attack.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

My boyfriend and I both spent a lot of time masturbating when we were young, and pretty much trained our brains to come only one way. He can only come from masturbating furiously, or sometimes from a marathon of jackhammer sex.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

cover! But I am having a crisis of conscience. On one hand, I support a person’s right to be whoever the heck they want to be.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

I’m a 35-year-old divorced man. I’ve been on plenty of dates since my marriage ended, but I invariably get asked this question on or before date number two: “Why did you get divorced?” This is where everything goes to shit. I’m honest: “We got divorced because I cheated on my wife.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

You often mention asexual people. I believe I may be one. I’m a 51-year-old woman. I’ve been separated from my opposite-sex partner for nearly nine years. I’ve been approached by a variety of men, each one interested in becoming “more than friends.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

Yesterday, I found my 5-year-old son putting things up his butt in the bath. This isn’t the first time — and it’s not just a “Hey! There’s a hole here! Let’s put things in there!” kind of thing. The little dude was rocking quite the stiffy while he did it.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

I’m a lesbian who has been pretty successful at online dating. Lately, however, I’ve had a few women contact me who turn out not to be cisgender. I’ve tried to remain open, but I have never been attracted to a trans woman. I don’t rule out the possibility that it could happen.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

Last summer, I reconnected with a high-school teacher I hadn’t seen for a year. We first met when I was 15, and I had nothing but respect for him and his intelligence. I also had a crush on him for the next four years. Fast-forward a year. He is sexting me and sending dick pics and wants to hook up.

Savage Love

SAVAGE LOVE

By Dan Savage

My partner is 31 years older than I am. I know the math: He’ll be 60 when I’m 29. But that isn’t the problem. The issue is he’s been a lifelong bachelor and never been monogamous. He’s fucked hundreds of women and is close friends with a lot of his former fuck buddies.

Stew's Views

Ladies and gentlemen, not the Grateful Dead

By Stewart Sallo

It has been almost 20 years since legendary Grateful Dead lead guitarist Jerry Garcia transitioned to the big acid test in the sky. And since Jerry left us the debate has raged over whether the remaining members of the band — Bob Weir, Phil Lesh, Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart — could call themselves the Grateful Dead. That question was answered definitively with a resounding “NO” this past weekend as some 500,000 fans logged on to the Ticketmaster website in an attempt to purchase tickets to the “Fare Thee Well” shows, scheduled for July 3-5 at Soldier Field in Chicago. You heard it here first: Even if these shows go down as the greatest in the history of rock and roll, this is not the Grateful Dead.

Stew's Views

Can a business do well and do good?

(or even because it does good)

By Stewart Sallo

As we pass another milestone in the Boulder Weekly journey — this one with a big 21 prominently displayed — I have a confession to make about this newspaper that has never been shared with our readers: Boulder Weekly is a corporation. You read that right: a corporation. And I’m not talking about a nonprofit corporation (although, believe me, there have been times in the not-too-distant past where the term “nonprofit” would have been hitting the nail squarely on the head).

Stew's Views

Why the 'Weekly' makes political endorsements

By Stewart Sallo

We all need trusted, authoritative sources to help us make our decisions, and, while there is no guarantee that accessing these sources will result in a good decision being made, chances are that on the whole our decisions will work out better when they are made after careful consideration and with reliable information in hand.

Stew's Views

The work that makes a difference

By Stewart Sallo

Over the course of almost 20 years and 1,000 editions, hundreds of talented individuals have worked for Boulder Weekly.

Stew's Views

Jerry Garcia’s 70th

By Stewart Sallo

Every life is a story. And every story requires a soundtrack. For life is a sensual experience, and among the senses, the sounds — and, particularly, the music — that accompany life’s experiences provide a context that enriches and completes them.

Stew's Views

4/20 smoke-screen

By Stewart Sallo

There are so many angles from which to contemplate the wrong that CU is perpetrating with respect to its tactics to end the “4/20 smokeout” that one hardly knows where to begin.

Stew's Views

A better time, a better hero

By Stewart Sallo

But despite the strength and power that he displayed at the plate, Killebrew exemplified a humble and gentle demeanor that has been all but lost in a modern era of baseball that is rife with ill-behaved, overpaid, egomaniacal athletes. Babe Ruth was a womanizer; Mickey Mantle was an alcoholic; Pete Rose was a gambler; Barry Bonds cheated with steroids. But Harmon Killebrew was the kind of heroic role model that every 8-year-old boy needs and deserves...

Stew's Views

Bikes and 'boarders

By Stewart Sallo

In the interest of full disclosure, I am an avid mountain biker. I enjoy riding several times a week, weather permitting, and for me that includes temperatures as low as 40 degrees, so long as the trails are clear and rideable with no residual damage. I have been known to get up at the crack of dawn, sneak away from the office in the middle of the day or hit the trails after work, rushing home for dinner after dark to the disapproving.

Stew's Views

He moved me brightly

By Stewart Sallo

About 40 seconds into a 1967 CBS TV documentary about the thengrowing Hippie movement in San Franciscos Haight-Ashbury District (http:// tinyurl.com/2wvzjqq), a youthful, unbearded Jerry Garcia makes his first appearance.

Stew's Views

Dear readers, supporters and community partners:

By Stewart Sallo

As we bid goodbye to 2009 and set our sights not only on a new year but a new decade, I would like to share with you some of what has happened during the past year at Boulder's only independent newspaper, as well as what you can expect to see from us in the coming year.

The Highroad

U.S. General salutes a military “hero”

By Jim Hightower

But no, Dempsey’s choice is even more twisted: King Abdullah Bin Abdul- Aziz of Saudi Arabia. Abdullah, who headed the royal Saud family and became the ruling Saudi monarch in 2005, died in January at age 90. Having served as U.S.

The Highroad

Trump tries to put his brand on GOP

By Jim Hightower

He announced his candidacy from, where else?, Trump Tower, the luxury skyscraper on toney Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. The celebrity billionaire who has splashed the Trump brand on casinos, hotels, resorts, condos, neckties, and even steaks, now wants to put it on the Republican Party.

The Highroad

Debt buyers bury hard-hit consumers in lies

By Jim Hightower

Whenever a corporation issues a statement declaring that it is committed to “treating consumers fairly and with respect,” chances are it’s not. After all, if the outfit was actually doing it, there would be no need for a statement. Indeed, this particular claim came from Encore Capital, one of our country’s largest buyers of bad consumer debt, and it definitely has not been playing nice with the people it browbeats to collect overdue credit card bills, car loans, etc.

The Highroad

The real scandal in Denny Hastert’s life

By Jim Hightower

Washington’s gossip mill is spinning furiously over the recent revelations about Dennis Hastert’s long hidden sexual molestation scandal. But what about the filthy, backroom affair he’s been openly conducting with corporate lobbyists for nearly two decades?.

The Highroad

You, too, can be part of Scott Walker’s inner circle

By Jim Hightower

That’s the ticket price for entering Walker’s inner circle, where you can discuss your policy concerns and seek personal favors — straight from your lips to the candidate’s ear! Even if you’re a common working stiff, just give a million dollars and you’re in! Is this a great country, or what?.

The Highroad

Presidential candidates sort of address inequality

By Jim Hightower

Congress had previously paid no attention to the ever-widening chasm between the rich and the rest of us, but it has recently emerged as a central issue for such Republican presidential contenders as Jeb Bush, Ted Cruz, Rand Paul and Marco Rubio. They are publicly lamenting the wealth gap and—by gollies—proposing solutions.

The Highroad

Obama gets desperate in pushing TPP

By Jim Hightower

Poor Barack Obama. He’s been making more flashy moves than an Olympic ice skater, trying to get Democrats in Congress to cheer his Trans-Pacific Partnership. But instead, they’re roundly booing him. The president is on such thin ice with this ponderous giveaway to global corporate giants that his appeals for support have turned desperate, including this recent claim that TPP, “is the most progressive trade deal in history.”

The Highroad

Obama’s bizarre sales pitch for TPP

Sometimes you get offered “a deal you can’t refuse.” Then there’s the deal that Barack Obama has offered to congressional Democrats.

By Jim Hightower

For some bizarre reason, Obama is staking his presidential legacy on a trade scam called the Trans-Pacific Partnership. It’s a corporate wet dream that would let profiteering giants in Japan, Vietnam, Brunei and eight other Pacific nations sue to overturn our national, state and even local laws that they claim might pinch their profits.

The Highroad

The legalized immorality of Big Pharma

By Jim Hightower

Al Capone, the infamous mob boss and bootlegger in Chicagoland during the 1920s, always maintained that he was just a businessman, saying the only difference between him and others was that the law criminalized his business, while legalizing the criminality of socalled “legitimate” businessmen.

The Highroad

Far from liberalizing global policies, TPP is corporatizing them

By Jim Hightower

Consider the current debate in Washington over the Trans-Pacific Partnership. This secretly negotiated deal is the exact opposite of a “liberal” reform, for it blatantly transfers a major portion of our people’s democratic sovereignty into the plutocratic hands of multinational corporate giants.

Weed Between the Lines

Oregon’s legalization process begins

By Leland Rucker

On Wednesday, Measure 91, the first part of the ballot initiative approved by 56 percent of Oregon voters in November, officially took effect. The state, which, in 1998 became the second to pass a medical marijuana statute, joins Colorado, Washington and Alaska (whose law went into effect in February) in decriminalizing adult possession of marijuana.

Weed Between the Lines

Is Denver ready to allow limited public cannabis consumption?

By Leland Rucker

A recent survey from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment found that 13.6 percent of Coloradans admitted to using marijuana in the last month, about twice the 7.4 percent of Americans who acknowledge using cannabis on national surveys.

Weed Between the Lines

Coats decision leaves it up to the legislature

By Leland Rucker

The Colorado Supreme Court Monday dealt the final legal blow to a Colorado man’s plea to keep his job after failing a random drug test administered by his employer in 2010. Brandon Coats, a quadriplegic who has a medical marijuana card and uses cannabis at home to help control leg spasms, had been a customer service representative of DISH Network until the drug test, for which he tested positive for THC. Coats admitted that he was a medical marijuana patient and would continue to use the drug, so he was fired.

Weed Between the Lines

Getting baked on a specially smoked salmon

By Leland Rucker

So I’m on the D train rolling north on Welton Street in Denver when I come across a headline that mentions “THC-infused smoked salmon.” I’m intrigued, since it involves two of my favorite things, and even more so when I notice the Huffington Post story is about a place that I frequent down the street from where I work.

Weed Between the Lines

Cannabis is all the style and now on the floor of the Senate

By Leland Rucker

Among the most surprising things I’ve witnessed in writing Weed Between the Lines for two years now is how quickly the cannabis debate is evolving in Congress. Back then, a small group of representatives, including Colorado’s Jared Polis, were trying, with little success, to get their colleagues to wake up to the fact that states were finding marijuana laws distasteful and changing them on their own.

Weed Between the Lines

High hopes for improved reporting on teen marijuana use

By Gavin Dahl

When Rocky Mountain Community Radio reporter Bente Birkeland began tracking legal marijuana’s impacts on Colorado teenagers earlier this year, she discovered key data wasn’t available. “The state does not require schools to report marijuana incidents separately,” Birkeland says. “Alcohol and tobacco are in separate categories. But marijuana shouldn’t be lumped in with cocaine or pharmaceuticals. It’s a tough story to report.”

Weed Between the Lines

Hemp and the woolly mammoth’s hair piece

By Leland Rucker

It’s no secret that hemp is one of the most misunderstood plants in history. For centuries, it has been used by all kinds of people for all kinds of things — clothing to car construction, bioplastics to building supplies, food to fuel. Though it was grown by the Founding Fathers, was a major crop in the U.S. for many years and doesn’t contain enough THC to get people “high,” it was blacklisted along with marijuana in 1937 and later listed as a Schedule One drug under the Controlled Substances Act in 1970, at least in part because the federal government couldn’t tell the difference between the two plants.

Weed Between the Lines

The golden years just might go better with pot

By Leland Rucker

So you’re one of the 13 percent of Boulderites who are over 55 years of age. It’s been almost a year and a half since marijuana legalization, and you’ve sat on the sidelines watching the experiment unfold. Maybe you tried it in college. Perhaps you weren’t willing to break the law when it was illegal.

Weed Between the Lines

Puerto Rico governor approves medical marijuana

By Leland Rucker

Another U.S. territory will allow medical marijuana for patients. Puerto Rican Gov. Alejandro Garcia Padilla signed an executive order this week that authorizes marijuana for certain medical uses under the control of the health department.

Weed Between the Lines

Common sense over nonsense in the weed wars

By Leland Rucker

I watched Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s CNN Weed 3 special last week. It’s another in his series about medical marijuana, and for the first time he is calling for national legalization. He also provides more fascinating evidence of how politics have stopped any meaningful study of medical cannabis here in the United States — and how public awareness and education might be finally changing that.

Close
Close