Cuisine

Does red or white go with turmeric?

Workshop aims to pair wine and spices

By Josh Gross

Blake and Tracy Eliasson have been running their winemaking business, Settembre Cellars, for seven years now in Boulder. But it was just in May of this year that they opened up the tasting room. Once they did, they had to figure out what to do with it. And what they decided to do this week, was try to send people elsewhere, to Savory Spice Shop.

Cuisine

Warming something up

How climate change is altering your dinner

By Lorena Galliot

The world’s population is projected to top 9 billion by 2050, a 28 percent leap that will greatly increase the demand for food just as climate change is altering rainfall patterns and causing more frequent and widespread droughts.

Cuisine

Meals on wheels

New food truck helps Boulder Valley School District take healthy lunch options on the road

By Heather Ridge

In their continuing efforts to up the ante on re-envisioning school lunch, the district has recently acquired a new mobile food truck that will be making the circuit across all of the district’s high schools to provide even more options for the noontime meal.

Cuisine

Fish in a Barrel

Backyard aquaponic systems are making it easier to grow your own fish

By Heather Ridge

Standing at the fresh seafood counter at the local grocery store, it’s hard not to encounter a dilemma these days. Fresh caught salmon sounds wild and free, until the viral images of Fukushima fallout maps come to mind. Overfishing and satellite images of dead zones in the Atlantic have you reaching for the farmed fish when you consider the environmental impacts of this choice as well.

Cuisine

Teatime

Fifteenth annual Rocky Mountain Tea Festival aims to explain all the tea in China

By Maalikah Hartley

The first tea fest put on 15 years ago by Martinelli and his wife Sara was meant to bring a higher awareness of international tea culture to Boulder. Industry leaders came out to teach workshops and hold tea tastings for customers interested in premium, loose leaf tea, and the event had such a gratifying outcome that it expand-.

Cuisine

There’s no business like brew business

Like artists and musicians everywhere, homebrewers also chase the dream of going pro

By Cody Gabbard

Just like those bands who feel they have mastered their chords and progressions, though, “homebrewers are a dime a dozen,” says Michael Memsic of Sanitas Brewing Company. And despite how good your friends say your award-winning homebrew is, there’s a lot more to it than recipe development.

Cuisine

Hangover killers

Dining out at midnight

By Grace Boyle

Summer is more than here — it’s hangover. Be sure you have cash on hand kicking hard. That means it’s because they don’t take credit cards. the perfect time to enjoy the Illegal Pete’s:.

Cuisine

Feeding the Front Range

National food prices rising faster than locally grown

By Heather Ridge

President John F. Kennedy once quipped that the farmer is “the only person in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale and pays the freight both ways.” As long-term droughts continue to dry out the fertile valleys and plains of California, Oklahoma and Texas, and many parts of the country recover from unprecedented frosts, food prices across the country are anticipated to rise.

Cuisine

A little cheesy

Boulder’s craft cheesemaking scene is small, but growing

By Kristen Kuchar

What started out as one simple, fresh chevre sold at farmers’ markets, developed into cheeses being herbcoated, marinated and smoked, winning national attention by snagging awards with the American Cheese Society. Queso de Mano, “A Cheese Named Sue,” Red Cloud and Green Chile Jack are some of the recent winners.

Cuisine

Pain and growth

Local therapists exploring the value of gardening

By Elizabeth Escobar

Horticultural therapy picks up where medicinal treatments leave off. By way of gardening work and instruction, horticultural therapy serves to assist the elderly and people with disabilities through an expanded range of activities — both physical and social.

Restaurant Review

Wokking the wok

Wok Eat and the joys of anti-mall-foodcourt cooking

By Josh Gross

It’s kind of an uphill battle for Wok Eat. It’s located across the street from a similar restaurant (the slightly cheaper Boulder favorite Zoe Ma Ma), and has a touch of the sterile look of a generic chain, despite it being the eatery’s only location..

Restaurant Review

Fettuccine a la ESPN

The curious case of Carelli’s confusing plasma screens

By Josh Gross

It was a line of thought that was hard to ignore at Carelli’s, a generally pleasant sit-down on the corner of 30th and Baseline in Boulder, where the ambiance included a jazz band playing in the corner, soft lights rotating colors above the bar and a faceful of the Little League World Series making error after error after error.

Restaurant Review

Following the recipe

Vina Pho & Grill is certainly Vietnamese food

By Josh Gross

The menu is as standard as the exterior architecture: pho and noodle bowls served with lime chili fish sauce (nuac cham). Par for the course, there are a wide variety of phos to choose from, the biggest differences between them being the cuts of meat.

Restaurant Review

Moving on up

La Choza takes it inside

By Josh Gross

La Choza took up its new brick and mortar digs in one of the vacant slots in the shopping center its parking lot served on Aug. 2, and if the line out the door and the 45-minute wait for a quartet of tacos de pastor was any clue, it’s a move Boulder is, ahem, “hungry for.”

Restaurant Review

Moby taco

Searching for tortilla-shod greatness at CyclHOPS Bike CANtina

By Josh Gross

While CyclHOPS vending tacos and bikes from one shop fronted with bike tools to aid commuters is an idea that deserves some sort of Nobel Prize, it also seemed slightly ironic that the location was on the sort of semi-rural drag strip of a street cyclists tend to avoid for fear of losing one of their three dimensions.

Restaurant Review

Best of the rest

Blooming Beets makes Paleo about what you can eat instead of what you can’t 

By Josh Gross

Blooming Beets is lifestyle eating if anything, no different in principle than the hip pizza joint or the restaurant that serves the same chow for twice the price as the corner diner just by adding a white table cloth.

Restaurant Review

Boiling point

Afternoon tea at The Huckleberry is a nice way to simmer down

By Josh Gross

Just one thing I want to know: how come I have to be Mr. Pink?” my co-worker Caitlin Rockett asked on our way to The Huckleberry in old town Louisville. But we weren’t headed there to pull a Reservoir Dogs; we were going to have a tea party.

Restaurant Review

Snap judgment

Casa Alvarez is more than the sum of its generic decor

By Josh Gross

At first glance, Casa Alvarez might as well be decorated exclusively in red flags. It occupies the back corner location of a 30th Street strip mall and has an interior that looks like every Mexican restaurant in every town, with light pastel coloring and tile, overly harsh lighting and awkward attempts to recreate a jungle atmosphere inside.

Restaurant Review

Peep this

Le Peep is where it’s at, so long as you accidently find it

By Josh Gross

It would be a lie to call Le Peep “Boulder’s best kept secret.” For one, the diner is a chain with dozens of locations, and it’s been in Boulder for 30 years or so. The chain has been around even longer. Then there’s the fact that it’s got a reasonable level of bustle in a central location.

Restaurant Review

Bite-sized

The Bitter Bar ditches its menu for finger food

By Josh Gross

Though downtown Boulder has its share of classy joints, when discerning Boulderites are looking for somewhere to wear their dress North Face jacket, or that little black dress that perfectly matches their nice Chacos, they head downtown to The Bitter Bar — this year’s Best of Boulder winner for “Best Bar” — and soak up the swank.

TidBites

Tidbites | Week of August 28, 2014

By Josh Gross

According to a press release (and the giant signs in its windows), Lyfe Kitchen is “a restaurant whose focus is on dishes that are 600 calories or less and which uses local, natural and organic products.” Low-calorie and organic? In Boulder? Inconceivable!.

TidBites

Tidbites | Week of August 21, 2014

By Caitlin Rockett

Kegs will be tapped at noon with 12-ounce pours selling for $5.25 and growlers going for $14. And as if this wasn’t enough fun, there’s a food pairing contest — attendees may bring a homemade dish to pair with the Jalapeno Cream Ale. Bartenders must receive dishes by 5 p.

TidBites

Tidbites

By Josh Gross

The historic Boulder hotel has spent the better part of the last year redoing this and that, working to bring out the period craftsmanship and vibe, and this week saw the opening of Spruce, an inhotel restaurant that replaced Q’s, the space’s former occupant.

TidBites

Tidbites | Week of August 7, 2014

By Maalikah Hartley

The car-free event will have people biking or walking to take in Boulder’s beauty while sampling coffees, teas, chocolate, and yes, alcohol-based coffees with participating shops. This year’s lineup includes The Unseen Bean, The Cup, Ozo Coffee, and Piece, Love and Chocolate among many others.

TidBites

Tidbites | Week of July 31, 2014

By Maalikah Hartley

The cinema-eatery that has taken over the 20-yearold Louisville Regal Colony Square Theater is having its grand opening for the public Friday, Aug. 1, at 1164 W. Dillon Road. Stepping inside the new facility you will be greeted by a circular, fully stocked bar in the lobby with 24 taps including local breweries like Avery, Great Divide and Odell.

TidBites

Tidbites | Week of July 24, 2014

By Maalikah Hartley

Bite-sized food stories for the week of July 24.

TidBites

Tidbites | Week of July 17, 2014

By Maalikah Hartley

Put on by the West End Tavern, 35 national breweries (mostly from Colorado) will pitch tents to serve their “best and baddest” India Pale Ales. The West End Tavern will be serving smoked chicken, pork, brisket, ribs, beans and more. There will be live music, a Wing King Challenge — featured on Man v.

TidBites

Tidbites | Week of July 10, 2014

By Maalikah Hartley

In honor of Tour de France, the 21-day cycling race around France, “Cured de France” breaks up the race into eight stages, corresponding with the region the cyclists are pedaling across, and pairs a specific beverage and cheese from that region for consumption.

TidBites

Tidbites | Week of July 03, 2014

By Maalikah Hartley

When the International House of Pancakes opened its first restaurant back in 1958 in a suburb of Los Angeles, the price of a short-stack was $0.60. Today it is $5.39. But on Tuesday, July 8 you can get the famous original buttermilk pancakes for $0.56 to celebrate the franchise’s 56th birthday.

TidBites

Tidbites | Week of June 26, 2014

By Maalikah Hartley

Owner Lindsay Shaw is wideeyed about the new launch set for June 27. More soups and sandwiches — some of which are employee-inspired — will join the classics like the “That’s What She Said,” and customized ice cream cakes made by Shaw will be available.

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