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Home » Articles »   By Ryan Syrek
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Thursday, March 27,2014

Quirking on something different

‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’ is nearly new

By Ryan Syrek
Essentially, The Grand Budapest Hotel is a wild caper, littered with macabre humor, more murder than one would anticipate (including severed heads and fingers) and one hell of a lead performance. The performer who hella delivered is Ralph Fiennes, who carves out a divinely unique character, named Gustave.
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Thursday, March 20,2014

Speedy and irritable

Need for Speed’ is neither fast nor furious

By Ryan Syrek
It nearly causes physical pain to recap the lobotomized shenanigans brought to life by writers George and John Gatins and director Scott Waugh, but here goes.
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Thursday, March 6,2014

Dumb wolf in smart sheep’s clothes

‘The Wolf of Wall Street’ is all excess and sex%u2028

By Ryan Syrek
Does the film’s dramatization of realworld douchehammer Jordan Belfort’s drug-fueled depravity lend tacit approval, implicitly embracing harmful excess for entertainment?
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Thursday, February 27,2014

Kevin Costner hates you

‘3 Days to Kill’ is punishment

By Ryan Syrek
The “character” in question here is Ethan Renner (Costner), a stunningly lethargic and nondescript CIA badass who finds out he has brain cancer. With only weeks to live, Ethan tries to reconnect with his estranged wife (Connie Nielsen) and daughter (Hailee Steinfeld).
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Thursday, February 20,2014

Droning on

‘Robocop’ is repetitive

By Ryan Syrek
For one moment, the completely unnecessary remake of Robocop suggested the possibility of non-suckage when a host of cable news propaganda, frothily and non-ironically suggests using the same drone-based military action we use abroad to curb violence at home. Suddenly, this Robocop appeared to have a purpose.
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Thursday, February 13,2014

Liveaction Oscar shorts a big deal

Showing as part of the International Film Series

By Ryan Syrek
This group is easily the collective best in the last decade, with three films that would have been stand-out front runners any other year. That sucks for them, but it’s great news for audiences treated to tight filmmaking at its finest.
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Thursday, February 6,2014

This year’s Oscar-nominated shorts are sublime

Will show as part of International Film Series

By Ryan Syrek
Just as the short story trembles in the footprint of the novel, the short film plays David to feature length film Goliaths. But with the help of shiny, naked bald men, these wee bits of cinematic splendor step from the shadows and sling their short shots.
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Thursday, January 30,2014

Alexander Payne's sweet stakes

Nebraska is a ‘feel nice’ trip

By Ryan Syrek
Nebraska is Payne’s fourth consecutive “reflections on an average white male life while on the road” film. When Woody (Bruce Dern), a crotchety wisp of an elderly man, gets a magazine sweepstakes letter telling him he “won” a million dollars, his increasingly addled mind becomes obsessed with it.
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Thursday, January 16,2014

Bright Phoenix

Her looks at automating the frequency of the human heart

By Ryan Syrek
The most laughable part of Her isn’t the complex, sophisticated romantic relationship between a man and his software operating system; it’s the high-waisted, Clint Eastwood-esque pants everybody wears.
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Thursday, January 9,2014

Saving Mr. Banks is a bankrupt effort

Story of making Mary Poppins nearly a horror movie for artists

By Ryan Syrek
Director John Lee Hancock isn’t Joseph Goebbels or Leni Riefenstahl by any stretch, but Saving Mr. Banks is as close to corporate propaganda as can be legally released in theaters.
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