Three dots in a cloud of haze…

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Me Too, and not in a good way… Colorado may have legalized pot in 2012, but the war on other drugs has continued throughout the state, with a staggering increase in felony drug incarcerations and a disproportionate impact on women… an analysis of court and prison data by the Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition found there were twice as many felony drug case filings in 2017 (15,323) compared to 2012 (7,424), and that the vast majority of them (75 percent) were for simple possession… From 2015 to 2016, the number of people sentenced to prison specifically for drug possession increased 17 percent overall and 24 percent among women… The study didn’t break down the number of cases for particular drugs, but presumably most of them were for opioids, cocaine and meth… it did say that only 5 percent were for felony pot offenses…

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Pee in a toilet, not in a cup… Some 56 percent of American employers require pre-employment drug tests, but there are some fields where you can find work without taking one… the website Insider Monkey compiled a list of some occupations in which hardly anyone (fewer than 4 percent) is asked to pee for a job… The pee-free workplace list includes information technology, marketing, real estate/insurance/finance, bartending, graphic design/copy writing, and — surprise — management…

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Candidates embrace marijuana… Democratic candidates anyway… In Illinois all six candidates in the Democratic primary for governor favor legalizing recreational marijuana… the two candidates on the Republican side, including incumbent governor Bruce Rauner, don’t, which means legalization is apt to be a major issue in November… In Michigan, both Democratic candidates for state attorney general are for legalization, although one of them, former U.S. Attorney Patrick Miles, is a Johnny-come-lately to the issue… Up until recently Miles wouldn’t take a position on the issue, saying it was up to the voters to decide… Now, upon further reflection, he’s changed his mind… As U.S. Attorney, he sent people to prison for marijuana violations… his opponent, Dana Nessel, is an outspoken supporter of legalization and has the endorsement of the group that’s petitioning a legalization initiative onto the November ballot in the state… In Massachusetts, Congressman Joe Kennedy, the guy who gave the Democratic answer to Trump’s State of the Union speech, is also “reconsidering” his past anti-pot positions now that he’s being talked about for higher office… As a Congressman, Kennedy opposed Massachusetts’ legalization initiative and in Congress voted against amendments to shield state medical marijuana laws from federal interference, allow military veterans to access medical marijuana, and protect children who use cannabidiol extracts to treat seizures… Now he says he’s prepared to support states that legalize pot and put in place “the proper safeguards and procedures…” In Ohio, former Congressman, former Cleveland Mayor and current gubernatorial candidate Dennis Kucinich says legalize it… Two other Dem governor hopefuls agree… One Republican U.S. Senate candidate has come out in support of medical marijuana — Arizona’s Joe Arpaio of all people… Arpaio, who billed himself as “America’s toughest sheriff” before he was convicted of criminal contempt of court and defeated for re-election, decided to run for the Senate after he was pardoned by President Trump… He says he “still can’t understand why you can’t go to a drug store on a prescription and get this type of drug… The medical dispensaries, I kind of support it if it can help the sick people…”

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The Minority Cannabis Business Association, (MCBA) in partnership with the University of Denver’s Daniels College of Business and the Hoban Law Group, is sponsoring an Opportunity Summit March 22-24 in Denver… Keynote speaker is former Denver Broncos running back and Hall of Famer Terrell Davis…

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Pot against opiates in Minnesota… Pot’s winning… Investigators assessed the prescription drug use patterns of 2,245 intractable pain patients enrolled in the state’s medical cannabis access program. Among the patients taking opiates for pain upon enrollment in the program, 63 percent “were able to reduce or eliminate their opioid use after six months…” Medical marijuana patients in Michigan experienced almost identical results…