<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Television]]> <![CDATA['Community' stars hope they get a passing grade from NBC]]> <![CDATA[Comcast scores controlling stake in NBC Universal]]> <![CDATA['Monk' role has been a dream job for Traylor Howard]]> HOLLYWOOD — You'd never know by watching the cast and crew of USA's whodunit, Monk, that its days are sadly numbered. After eight seasons the obsessive-compulsive detective, his ministering assistant and pals at the precinct are heading off into the sunset after Dec. 4.]]> <![CDATA[ABC's Oscar audience grows by 14 percent; biggest number in five years]]> <![CDATA[Starz, no. 3 pay channel, scores first original series hit with Roman slave saga]]> There's no confusing Starz's "Spartacus: Blood and Sand" with Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." In the pay TV channel's adaptation of the tale of the rebel Roman slave, the battle cries from the Classical Age have, well, a distinctly 21st century ring ("My boot will meet your ass in the afterlife!"). The sexual intrigue seems lifted right out of a VH1 dating show (when a socialite decides to buy one of the gladiators-in-training, the men are ordered to drop their loincloths so she can make an informed choice). Then there's the graphic, slo-mo violence (including a severed, flying head that would impress Quentin Tarantino).]]> <![CDATA[The forgotten 'Survivor': Vecepia would like another shot at reality show]]> When the current season of "Survivor: Heroes vs. Villains" launched, its cast featured nine contestants making their third appearance on the popular reality show. But nowhere to be found was Vecepia Robinson. In fact, Robinson, who earned a niche in reality TV history as the show's first black winner in 2002, never has returned to "Survivor" since capturing the $1 million prize in the Season 4 Marquesas edition. When producers initially sent out their wide casting net for "Heroes vs. Villains," the Hayward resident didn't get an invite. Not even a casual inquiry.]]> <![CDATA[Casting for Discovery Channel's 'Colony' comes to Denver]]> <![CDATA[HBO's 'Ricky Gervais Show' reunites Gervais with Stephen Merchant]]> <![CDATA[ABC's 'FlashForward' looks ahead, not behind]]> ABC launched "FlashForward" in September to generally good reviews and ratings. Then, after only 10 episodes, it was pulled and has been off the air for more than three months. The series returns to the ABC schedule with a two-hour special Thursday night.]]> <![CDATA[Comedy Central's 'The Daily Show' and 'The Colbert Report' leaving Hulu]]> Hulu's losing two of its biggest attractions. In a bid to better capitalize on the popularity of its shows, Comedy Central has decided to no longer provide episodes of "The Daily Show," and "The Colbert Report" to the video Web site and keep them on the sites they own.]]> <![CDATA[10 things to love about 'Mad Men']]> With its melancholy, mesmerizing third season coming out on DVD this Tuesday, I spent a recent weekend re-watching "Mad Men." The series, as its fans know, is set in a fictional Madison Avenue ad agency called Sterling Cooper (for its founders, Roger Sterling and Bertram Cooper); with the current story unfolding in 1963. Here are 10 of my favorite things about the show, created by Matthew Weiner, which will return to AMC this summer for its fourth season.]]> <![CDATA[20 questions for … Alison Brie and Donald Glover of NBC's 'Community']]> Donald Glover plays football jock Troy and Alison Brie plays goody two-shoes Annie on NBC's new comedy, Community, which airs Thursdays at 8 p.m. EST on NBC. Brie, who also plays Trudy on Mad Men, and Glover, who wrote for 30 Rock before joining the Community cast, indulge in a friendly, teasing, tete a tete of sorts, as they consider 20 Questions.]]> <![CDATA['Steven Seagal Lawman,' premiering Wednesday on A&E]]> <![CDATA[Delving into 'Dexter': Voice-overs provide a glimpse into the Showtime serial killer's mind]]> Not all voice-overs are created equal. Kristin Bell helps set the snarky tone of the CW's "Gossip Girl," and Brenda Strong adds gravitas to ABC's "Desperate Housewives." But neither is asked to do what Michael C. Hall, star of Showtime's "Dexter," does every episode: invite viewers to listen in on the thoughts of television's most sympathetic serial killer.]]> <![CDATA[Neil Patrick Harris suits up]]> <![CDATA['Alice,' Sunday and Monday on Syfy]]> TV characters frequently slip through some version of the looking glass and find themselves in strange places — a surreal island on Lost, an alternate universe on Fringe, an odd totalitarian landscape in AMC's recent remake of The Prisoner. So it's only natural that every now and then, TV tackles the stories that gave us the "through the looking glass" phrase in the first place, Lewis Carroll's tales about Alice in Wonderland.]]> <![CDATA[Ray Romano hopes everybody loves his new TNT series]]> BURBANK, Calif. — Everybody may love Raymond except for Ray Romano himself. The star of the long-running hit sitcom "Everybody Loves Raymond" has managed to stay the same guy he was when he was repairing futon mattresses for his best friend and living in Queens.]]> <![CDATA[On Friday, O'Brien to say farewell to NBC]]> <![CDATA[Oprah to announce 2011 end to her daytime show]]> <![CDATA[Gorgeous 11-part series captures the beauty and pathology of nature]]> "Life," like its predecessor "Planet Earth," is the reason flat screens, Blu-ray and high-definition TV were invented. No doubt the 11-part series, with its astonishingly intimate footage of A-Z species engaged in every sort of behavior, will play well on any screen. But its color, scope, detail and gorgeousness cry out for a home theater situation, one of those screens so big you can watch it from the street.]]>