<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Special Editions]]> <![CDATA[Green your grill]]> It’s a tradition that’s quintessential to summer. It just doesn’t quite feel like summer until you’ve tossed a few burgers (maybe a couple portabella caps for the veggie crowd) on the grill, a cold beer in one hand and tongs in the other. But few of us ever stop to think about the environmental impact of our summer barbeques.]]> <![CDATA[New hydropower could ease transition from fossil fuels]]> If you’ve ever spent time around one of Colorado’s rivers or streams during spring and summer runoff, you’ve had a taste of nature at its best. Supercharged, ionized air, forest and wildflowers, and, above all, massive torrents of water sweeping from the high Rockies out into the plains, or through sandstone canyons toward the distant Pacific.]]> <![CDATA[Ash borers? You can blame Marco Polo’s camels]]> The story of invasive species goes all the way back to the earliest stages of human development, when bands of hominids dispersing from Africa carried with them the crumbs, seeds and eggs of whatever ecosystems they happened to be passing through. And you can be sure that, along with silk and spices, Marco Polo’s camels transported disease-ridden fleas between Europe and Asia.]]> <![CDATA[Boulderganic Summer issue is here!]]> As residents of the Centennial State, we know Colorado is beautiful — from the farms of its sweeping eastern plains to the rugged, snow-capped peaks of the Rocky Mountains to its semi-arid southwestern chaparral deserts. It’s not hard to understand why Colorado is the fourth fastest growing state in the nation.]]> <![CDATA[The artist in everyone, anywhere, from anything]]> Talk to El Anatsui about the thousands of bottlecaps used in his artwork, and he’s less concerned with the obvious problem — yes, these were garbage headed for landfills that now hang on museum walls — than the issue they represent for his community.]]> <![CDATA[Power use and marijuana: Where the grass isn’t greener]]> Indoor marijuana grow operations aren’t as green as the weed they produce. According to data from Xcel Energy and estimates from those familiar with indoor growing, a single light used to grow 16 square feet of pot consumes about half as much energy as the average Colorado house in a one-month time frame.]]> <![CDATA[Rockies flora show climate impact]]> An intensive study of the flora of one meadow in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado over nearly 40 years reveals a widespread and consistent pattern of climate-induced change.]]> <![CDATA[Making it rain]]> It’s a practice that was used for thousands of years, but with the development of sewage systems and chemical fertilizer, the practice of recycling urine and using it as fertilizer went by the way side. Recently, this old practice gained new momentum in the U.]]> <![CDATA[Putting farm-fresh food on the table]]> Unless you haven’t eaten out in Boulder, have never gone downtown on a Wednesday or Saturday, haven’t driven through farm country in Boulder County, and haven’t shopped a grocery store in Boulder, you’re probably aware that the local food movement here is thriving.]]> <![CDATA[National parks push for sustainable food services]]> If your spring or summer travel plans this year include a national park visit, be sure to check out the healthier food options that are showing up in cafeterias and restaurants at our public lands crown jewels — and if you find some, be sure to give the chef and the park a shout-out to help encourage the transition to more sustainable eating habits.]]> <![CDATA[When it pours]]> <![CDATA[Tomato jam that`s the jam]]> Despite how much I love ketchup, it never occurred to me that tomatoes could belong in jam.]]> <![CDATA[Nothing but net-zero]]> Boulder County’s most energy efficient home sits at 6712 Jay Road. The residence, to be completed within a year, is expected to produce 29 percent more energy than it consumes using a combination of solar, wind and geothermal systems.]]> <![CDATA[Reinventing the toilet]]> Karl Linden and his research team are not reinventing the wheel, but they are trying to reinvent the toilet. It began several years ago for Linden, a professor of environmental engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder, in a class he taught about water sanitation and hygiene. He gave a short assignment about potential global health initiatives.]]> <![CDATA[Debunking the gas industry’s pitch]]> Marketing is a tough job, particularly when you’re trying to push something that most people don’t really want, say, for instance, a giant natural gas production platform stuck right in the middle of a neighborhood or next to a school or maybe even in someone’s backyard, provided the yard is big enough.]]> <![CDATA[Boulder’s green economy brings in the green]]> The ticket out of the recession may be to recognize that economic recovery cannot be framed as a white-collar or blue-collar (or even a red or blue) issue. Building a vital and competitive economy will require innovative, growth-oriented thinking. It will require us to recognize that, this time, the real solutions may be in the hands of the green-collared workers.]]> <![CDATA[Growing past the flood]]> Though more than six months have passed since the September flood that destroyed homes, displaced roads and scarred landscapes, remnants of the flood still mark the land of Boulder County in the form of erosion and sediment deposits. Farms, gardens and backyards with flood damage may need to be assessed or even tested for growers to determine what needs to be done to their property to restore its condition for another growing season.]]> <![CDATA[Engineering citizens of change]]> Beyond economic prosperity, Boulder’s startup culture also shows a correlation between strong businesses and strong communities as evidenced by such organizations as the Entrepreneurs Foundation of Colorado, a trendsetter for economic community-mindedness that has provided more than $2 million in community funding, benefitting Front Range area nonprofits.]]> <![CDATA[High water and high stakes]]> The flood that hit Colorado in 2013 couldn’t have come at a worse time for many farmers. In the middle of September, many fruits and vegetables are near ripe and ready for harvest, leaving them vulnerable to damage from flood waters and the pollutants in the water. Some farms had to declare the 2013 harvest a total loss.]]> <![CDATA[Yoga for the common folk]]> Tabitha Farrar places her hands and feet on her mat in the downward-facing dog position and releases a deep breath. When her face appears again, a smile breaks out. Her co-worker and, for the moment, yoga classmate, is squirming next to her while Ted Nugent plays in the background and the sound of glasses clinking and laughing rings out from the brewery bar in the next room.]]>