<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Special Editions]]> <![CDATA[Yes or no to GMOs?]]> <![CDATA[Your health in the halo]]> <![CDATA[Profile of a sustainability hub]]> It’s been 10 years since the Alliance Center took up residence as a multitenant co-working space on Wynkoop Street in Denver; grassroots powerhouses like Conservation Colorado have anchored the center since it opened its doors in 2004. But this August, it emerged from eight months of multimillion-dollar renovation as a true bastion of sustainability.]]> <![CDATA[Marijuana Growing Practices]]> The passage of Amendment 64 in Colorado legalized recreational marijuana for those 21 years of age or older, and House Bill 1317 initiated mandatory potency testing — but only for the recreational stuff.]]> <![CDATA[Intelligent irrigation: using less water for lawns and gardens in Boulder]]> The reality, they point out, is that we live in an arid environment, and instead of worrying so much about keeping front lawns green, perhaps we should adopt outdoor watering patterns that are more consistent with the hand that Mother Nature has dealt us locally.]]> <![CDATA[Hemp Industry Overview]]> What if we just woke up one day and corn was outlawed?” asks Eric Hunter, president of the Rocky Mountain Hemp Association. “Imagine if 80 years down the road corn was illegal. There go chips, corn syrup, plastic cups.]]> <![CDATA[The need for seaweed]]> “A robust dose of marine minerals, specifically iodine via the potent variety of sea vegetable, is the most effective way to increase iodine naturally and balance the thyroid,” says Sue Van Raes, a nutritional therapist, health coach and founder of Boulder Nutrition.]]> <![CDATA[Making it rain]]> It’s a practice that was used for thousands of years, but with the development of sewage systems and chemical fertilizer, the practice of recycling urine and using it as fertilizer went by the way side. Recently, this old practice gained new momentum in the U.]]> <![CDATA[Secret practice]]> <![CDATA[Ash borers? You can blame Marco Polo’s camels]]> The story of invasive species goes all the way back to the earliest stages of human development, when bands of hominids dispersing from Africa carried with them the crumbs, seeds and eggs of whatever ecosystems they happened to be passing through. And you can be sure that, along with silk and spices, Marco Polo’s camels transported disease-ridden fleas between Europe and Asia.]]> <![CDATA[The dirt on reusing soil]]> In places where winters can get harsh — and there will be at least a couple of harsh winter weeks here on the Front Range — soil will expand and contract, so a mindful gardener will want to empty plastic, ceramic or clay containers to prevent them from cracking.]]> <![CDATA[E-wasteful]]> There are costs that consumers aren’t told about at the cash register, and approaching economics environmentally reveals that the price tag often fails to illustrate the true cost of an item.]]> <![CDATA[Peak fitness]]> If you haven’t been to high altitudes in a while, you will likely feel the effects of the thin air. Serious health issues, including High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) and High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) can occur as low as 6,000 feet, but for the majority of Colorado residents, should not be an issue. However, Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is an issue, which is why you should take steps to prepare for high altitude hikes.]]> <![CDATA[The plentiful bounty of fall]]> We go beyond food to look at how Colorado hemp farmers struggle to grow this newly regulated (and highly useful) crop, the difficulties the marijuana industry confronts in producing a truly organic product and how one century-old building is leading the way in sustainable architecture.]]> <![CDATA[Safe spring cleaning]]> <![CDATA[Soot on snow]]> The duo of snowmobiles has climbed to over 6,000 feet elevation, halfway to the study site where researcher Susan Kaspari and her small team will dig into six feet of snow and sample for soot, more accurately known as black carbon.]]> <![CDATA[Full backpacks, full stomachs]]> As the temperature drops and the leaves change color, kids around the nation get back into the swing of school. For some students it means little more than early mornings and evenings lost to homework, but for others, it means knowing they won’t go home hungry — at least during the week.]]> <![CDATA[Processed food nation]]> “I first started writing about the food industry about 10 years ago,” Warner continues. “When I started talking to people in the field of food science, they started telling me all these crazy things about the incredible technical complexity that goes into making our food.]]> <![CDATA[Fish food]]> The Aquaponic Source, a company based out of Longmont, hopes to increase the number of aquaponic systems being used in classrooms across that nation with their new Grants for Plants Foundation, but some Boulder County students are already reaping the benefits.]]> <![CDATA[A day in the life of a Boulder County GMO farmer]]> Paul Schlagel’s business purchases usually consist of irrigation piping or seeds, so it’s understandable that the farmer is eager to show off his new toy: a GPS-guided John Deere tractor.]]>