<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Special Editions]]> <![CDATA[The buzz about bees]]> <![CDATA[Debunking the gas industry’s pitch]]> Marketing is a tough job, particularly when you’re trying to push something that most people don’t really want, say, for instance, a giant natural gas production platform stuck right in the middle of a neighborhood or next to a school or maybe even in someone’s backyard, provided the yard is big enough.]]> <![CDATA[A community mission]]> Boulder’s first food co-op, The Second Kitchen, is trying to make a bigger difference when it comes to quality and sustainability of food distribution, while not forgetting their humble beginnings. The organization’s name is a tribute to those humble begins, when co-founder Sara Brody once used the second kitchen of her duplex to house large sacks of grains and other products for it’s first few years as a buy-in club.]]> <![CDATA[Boulderganic Summer issue is here!]]> As residents of the Centennial State, we know Colorado is beautiful — from the farms of its sweeping eastern plains to the rugged, snow-capped peaks of the Rocky Mountains to its semi-arid southwestern chaparral deserts. It’s not hard to understand why Colorado is the fourth fastest growing state in the nation.]]> <![CDATA[Growing past the flood]]> Though more than six months have passed since the September flood that destroyed homes, displaced roads and scarred landscapes, remnants of the flood still mark the land of Boulder County in the form of erosion and sediment deposits. Farms, gardens and backyards with flood damage may need to be assessed or even tested for growers to determine what needs to be done to their property to restore its condition for another growing season.]]> <![CDATA[Putting farm-fresh food on the table]]> Unless you haven’t eaten out in Boulder, have never gone downtown on a Wednesday or Saturday, haven’t driven through farm country in Boulder County, and haven’t shopped a grocery store in Boulder, you’re probably aware that the local food movement here is thriving.]]> <![CDATA[Ash borers? You can blame Marco Polo’s camels]]> The story of invasive species goes all the way back to the earliest stages of human development, when bands of hominids dispersing from Africa carried with them the crumbs, seeds and eggs of whatever ecosystems they happened to be passing through. And you can be sure that, along with silk and spices, Marco Polo’s camels transported disease-ridden fleas between Europe and Asia.]]> <![CDATA[New hydropower could ease transition from fossil fuels]]> If you’ve ever spent time around one of Colorado’s rivers or streams during spring and summer runoff, you’ve had a taste of nature at its best. Supercharged, ionized air, forest and wildflowers, and, above all, massive torrents of water sweeping from the high Rockies out into the plains, or through sandstone canyons toward the distant Pacific.]]> <![CDATA[Rockies flora show climate impact]]> An intensive study of the flora of one meadow in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado over nearly 40 years reveals a widespread and consistent pattern of climate-induced change.]]> <![CDATA[E-wasteful]]> There are costs that consumers aren’t told about at the cash register, and approaching economics environmentally reveals that the price tag often fails to illustrate the true cost of an item.]]> <![CDATA[The healing power of frequencies]]> Past the meticulously manicured yard of Marybeth Keigher’s North Boulder house, surrounded by vibrant flowers and fountains, lies what appears to be a converted guesthouse that now serves as a studio for her acupuncture and sound healing practice.]]> <![CDATA[Fiber problems]]> <![CDATA[Corporate gardening for a sustainable world]]> CorpCROP is on a mission to get you off your chair and out into the sunlight. With the rise in health issues due to sitting behind a desk all day, people like Jennifer Klafin, founder and managing director of CorpCROP, are figuring out ways to help keep office workers happier and healthier.]]> <![CDATA[Reinventing the toilet]]> Karl Linden and his research team are not reinventing the wheel, but they are trying to reinvent the toilet. It began several years ago for Linden, a professor of environmental engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder, in a class he taught about water sanitation and hygiene. He gave a short assignment about potential global health initiatives.]]> <![CDATA[How to plan what you plant]]> <![CDATA[Natural foods riding a boom]]> <![CDATA[One man’s trash is another man’s business venture]]> Northeast of Denver in the small town of Hudson lies the largest tire dump in the U.S., known by many as Tire Mountain. Immediately south of Colorado Springs sits the nation’s second largest tire dump. Combined, the Rubber Manufacturing Association says, Colorado’s tire dumps, known as monofills, accounted for 40 percent of the nation’s waste tires in 2011 — an estimated 60 million tires.]]> <![CDATA[When it pours]]> <![CDATA[Intelligent irrigation: using less water for lawns and gardens in Boulder]]> The reality, they point out, is that we live in an arid environment, and instead of worrying so much about keeping front lawns green, perhaps we should adopt outdoor watering patterns that are more consistent with the hand that Mother Nature has dealt us locally.]]> <![CDATA[EPA under pressure to protect pollinators]]> Boulder-area beekeeper Tom Theobald, three other beekeepers from around the country and five environmental organizations filed a joint lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency for the agency’s alleged failure to protect bees and other pollinators from systemic neonicotinoid pesticides, which are commonly applied in the U.S.]]>