<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Eco-Briefs]]> <![CDATA[Eco-briefs | Appeal of BLM drilling projects in Wyoming advances in federal court]]> <![CDATA[eco-briefs]]> <![CDATA[Battle cry issued from 180,000 opponents of Pebble Mine]]> Opponents of the proposed Pebble copper mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska, have come out in full force, flooding the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) during a public comment period on the proposal with about 200,000 comments in opposition to the project, and the EPA is still counting.]]> <![CDATA[eco-briefs]]> “As a result, in much of the state, it is illegal to divert rainwater falling on your property expressly for a certain use unless you have a very old water right or during occasional periods when there is a surplus of water in the river system,” the division writes on their website.]]> <![CDATA[eco-briefs]]> <![CDATA[Eco-briefs | The Second Kitchen food co-op plans to expand on the Hill]]> If passed by the House, SB 252 would require rural cooperatives with more than 100,000 meters to obtain 25 percent of their electricity from renewable energy sources by 2020. To help compensate for extra costs, the bill would also allow co-ops to tack on an extra 2 percent to customer bills, rather than the 1 percent that gets added now.]]> <![CDATA[eco-briefs]]> <![CDATA[eco-briefs]]> The groups argue that the predictions for Grand Junction and White River BLM districts are grossly underestimating the amount of water that will be required. The new estimate is that each well would require 250,005 gallons of water. However, groups claim water use for horizontal drilling between 2011 and 2014 averaged 3.]]> <![CDATA[Eco-briefs | Artists organize against fracking]]> Frack Free Colorado, a collaborative group of organizations hoping to raise awareness of fracking, will team up with Patagonia’s Boulder store to host a gathering at 7:30 p.m. on Aug. 5.]]> <![CDATA[Eco-briefs | Week of September 26, 2013]]> The House Natural Resources Committee held two full committee field hearings in Casper, Wyo., and Billings, Mont., to open discussion with the public about authorizing the Endangered Species Act to protect the sage grouse.]]> <![CDATA[Energy companies outbid farmers for water]]> It takes millions of gallons of water to hydraulically fracture a well. Not good news considering that this looks to be a very dry year going forward from one of the driest Marches in Colorado history. ]]> <![CDATA[Eco-briefs | Week of October 03, 2013]]> A new solar cell structure has measured an efficiency rating of 44.7 percent, edging out the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s previous record of 43.5 percent.]]> <![CDATA[Solar energy program creates opportunity for low-income families in Lafayette]]> Energy bills are no small matter for families with low income. ]]> <![CDATA[Eco-briefs | Chimney Rock designated a national monument]]> A thousand years ago, members of the Chaco civilization chose Chimney Rock as the site of a village of more than 200 homes.]]> <![CDATA[Boreal Toad one hop closer to protection]]> Fish and Wildlife Service announced what is called a 90-day finding regarding the Boreal Toad. What this means is that a full review of the toad’s status will now be conducted and a final decision as to whether or not the toad will be placed under Endangered Species Act protection must be made within one year.]]> <![CDATA[Not so fast, EPA]]> Amid mounting criticism against a proposed copper mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska, a group of independent environmental scientists are crying foul at an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assessment of the prospective project.]]> <![CDATA[eco-briefs]]> <![CDATA[eco-briefs]]> The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reopened the public comment forum concerning the western yellow-billed cuckoo being added to the threatened species list for a second time in response to public demand and to allow researchers more time to finish collecting scientific information.]]> <![CDATA[Eco-briefs]]> “From our perspective, we are looking forward to working with the county and state to promote extra tourism and recreation in the area,” says Megan Crandell, a Bureau of Land Management representative. But, she adds, “There’s no official proposal yet.”.]]> <![CDATA[eco-briefs]]> According to the American Heart Association, pollutants related to fuel combustion are the most serious because they are tiny and harder prevent. They lead to irritation of the lungs and blood vessels around the heart. Short-term exposure can increase risk of stroke and heart attack.]]>