<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[The edge of heaven]]> Yo, America: Stop making beer worse.]]> <![CDATA[Much ado about poison]]> In late March, two couples filed a class-action lawsuit in California alleging that some of the nation’s top-selling low-cost wines contain unsafe levels of arsenic. “Just a glass or two” of wine from producers like Cupcake, Charles Shaw, Franzia, Rex Goliath and Korbel “could result in dangerous arsenic toxicity,” according to the suit.]]> <![CDATA[Why breweries shouldn't make Super Bowl bets]]> After a drubbing so severe that Comedy Central’s Jon Stewart called it “the Seahawks ‘bring a Bronco to work day,’’’ Downtown Boulder’s West Flanders Brewing has to make good on the Super Bowl bet it made with Seattle’s Elysian Brewing.]]> <![CDATA[Go east, young beer drinker]]> The beer tour launched its Longmont leg last week, heading up the Diagonal to longtime standout Left Hand. For the next two weeks East County is our home, as we hit Oskar Blues this week and the Pumphouse the next.]]> <![CDATA[This hat is money]]> At face value, the Bourbon and Bacon Fest, which was held at the McNichols Civic Center in Denver on a late January Saturday afternoon, is what shows up in the dream catcher. It’s two hours of unlimited samples of about 50 bourbons, and variations on bacon ranging from pulled pork belly to bacon cupcakes to bacon pizza.]]> <![CDATA[American agave]]> Tatanka is an American alternative to Mexican tequila, which uses the fermented sap of the agave plant. Agave — a large succulent not to be confused as a type of cactus — is similar in appearance to aloe with its long, flat leaves covered in spines. Blue weber agave, or Agave tequilana, is responsible for the production of tequila.]]> <![CDATA[Looking for a wine list bargain?]]> One recent Saturday morning, a friend sent me the wine list for Green Zebra, one of Chicago’s top vegetarian restaurants, and asked for my advice. He was dining there that evening with friends who enjoyed wine but weren’t obsessive about it. So he would be tasked with ordering for the table.]]> <![CDATA[Fruitful]]> The previous two years of wine production in Colorado were poor. There was some doubt many of the vineyards and farms in Colorado’s high country, along the Colorado River, would recover this year. However, this year brought optimal growing weather for nearly all of the state’s producers, and Boulder County wineries are excited about the rebound.]]> <![CDATA[Colorado Craft Beer Week]]> The real, honest, fo’ realsies, no fooling, super-special one and only official Colorado Craft Beer Week runs Friday, March 21, through Saturday, March 29, and it’s packed to the beer-breathing gills with craft-brewed events for you to woot about from atop the most conveniently located 14er.]]> <![CDATA[Go wild]]> The second annual Boulder Valley Beer Fest takes place in conjunction with the Town of Superior’s annual Chili Fest on Saturday, Sept. 12 from 2-6:30 p.m. The event will be held at the beautiful Superior Community Park, located at 1350 Coalton Road in Superior.]]> <![CDATA[In wine, accidental stars abound]]> Born to Run, the album that catapulted Bruce Springsteen into the national spotlight, celebrated its 40th anniversary last month. Springsteen fanatics love sharing the story behind the album. The Boss released two records in 1973, and although critics praised both, they flopped. So Springsteen’s third effort was, quite literally, his last chance. As Springsteen biographer Peter Ames Carlin once explained, “Columbia [Records] gave Bruce and the band just enough money to produce one song to show he could make great singles and prove the next album would be worth making. That’s why [the band] took six months on ‘Born to Run.’ Every single note had to be perfect, otherwise they knew they would be going back to Asbury Park empty-handed.”]]> <![CDATA[Bitchin’ brews]]> This week’s beer tour takes us back to a time when pants could moonlight as parachutes and Frankie asked us to relax. (Full disclosure: I was born in 1985, so I’m not actually qualified to make any statements about life in the ’80s. Without Googling, I couldn’t tell you who Frankie was or why he wanted us to relax.]]> <![CDATA[Big beers and food fixes]]> We didn’t have much hope for food in Gravity Brewing’s Louisville warehouse. They’ve got a billionfoot-long bar and pool and pingpong tables, but there’s no sign of dining until we smell someone else’s fries.]]> <![CDATA[A drink to celebrate]]> The lore is that the sazerac is the oldest American cocktail. The story goes that in the mid-1800s, the owner of the Merchant Exchange Coffee House in New Orleans sold the place to start importing liquor. One of his imports was a cognac called Sazerac-de- Forge et Fils.]]> <![CDATA[Brewganic]]> For one, organic hops are a somewhat new presence in the organic beer scene. It wasn’t until January 2013 that the National Organic Standards Board required organic beer to have organic hops, since the product wasn’t readily available.]]> <![CDATA[Going hopless]]> Even on the last leg of our Boulder County beer tour — a trip up to Nederland to visit both Wild Mountain and Very Nice breweries — we’re learning something new, courtesy of Very Nice co-owner Susan Green.]]> <![CDATA[The great forgotten Italian red]]> Far be it from me to dispute that. I don’t know how, and I’m scared to. But in that due bluster around nebbiolo and sangiovese, and their subsequent products, it’s hard to find on Boulder County menus what some of us hiding over in the corner consider Italy’s finest red: amarone della Valpolicella.]]> <![CDATA[Bordeaux’s hidden gems]]> Fortunately, four close friends shared my interest in wine. So we gathered at my house to explore the wines of France. Each attendee was tasked with purchasing a $35 to $50 bottle from Champagne, Burgundy or the Rhône Valley. I volunteered to spend $135 on a “trophy” wine from Bordeaux.]]> <![CDATA[In with the old]]> At a recent wine tasting in Boulder, there was a rarity being poured. We were all assured of it. The wine was made from 100 percent bobal grapes, a red varietal that is rarely seen in the U.S. on its own and is often used in blends.]]> <![CDATA[Cask-conditioned ales: Keeping it real]]> I can remember the feeling, not so long ago, of sitting down at a bar with a decent craft beer selection and being bewildered.]]>