<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[Pucker up]]> Recently, New Belgium Brewing in Fort Collins added Snapshot to their year-round lineup, which is billed as a citrusy and tart wheat beer. Although not listed on the bottle, Snapshot utilizes a mixed-fermentation which includes lactobacillus (a yeast strain which can impart “tart,” “sour,” and “barnyard” characteristics). As far as sours go, Snapshot is quite tame compared to some of its mouth-puckering counterparts.]]> <![CDATA[Stout Month and beyond]]> Also going down at Avery this week is All You Need is a Beer, a paired beer and chocolate tasteapalooza that will include no shortage of yakking about the history, culture and “health benefits” of chocobooze combos.]]> <![CDATA[Vapor Distillery is going big time]]> Boulder County lost one of its most highly decorated distilleries at the beginning of April, and that is a good thing. Roundhouse Spirits, distilling since 2008, has ceased to exist due to naming rights for their products and overall company. But don’t despair, because in its place is Vapor Distillery, and things are about to get bigger and better.]]> <![CDATA[Go big or go home]]> Like a proud father Adam Avery would be justified in bragging about his new brewery. After 22 years bumping into walls and struggling to brew enough beer to keep up with the public’s unquenchable thirst for his signature products, the opening of his new state-ofthe-art brewery calls for.]]> <![CDATA[Anatomy of a collaboration]]> Let’s put a pair of leather chaps in the mash, or cactus or tumbleweed.” That was the first idea Jason Buehler, head brewer of Oskar Blues in Lyons, had for Hi*Beams Honky Tonk Ale, a collaboration beer made not with another brewery, but a honky tonk band.]]> <![CDATA[The saga continues]]> <![CDATA[D-Day at The Post Brewing Company]]> The official concept for The Post is simple: “beer and chicken.” Buckets and buckets of chicken.]]> <![CDATA[Prince-worthy findings at Smiling Toad]]> It was as though we had arrived in the living room of a welcoming friend — a friend who happens to have six craft-with-a-“c” beers on tap, a really beautiful blonde wood bar and well-padded bar stools.]]> <![CDATA[Bitchin’ brews]]> This week’s beer tour takes us back to a time when pants could moonlight as parachutes and Frankie asked us to relax. (Full disclosure: I was born in 1985, so I’m not actually qualified to make any statements about life in the ’80s. Without Googling, I couldn’t tell you who Frankie was or why he wanted us to relax.]]> <![CDATA[Basement BRU]]> Clark, one of Boulder’s biggest beer nerds, needs a bigger, more beer-centric stage for a nanobrewery that should be ranked among the state’s best.]]> <![CDATA[Old school]]> Everything old is new again, including ancient herbal beers regaining popularity in the craft beer world after about a 250-year hiatus. They’re called gruits, which refers to a mixture of oldfashioned herbs and spices used to bitter and flavor beer prior to the prevalence of hops (although hops began being used in gruits around the second century).]]> <![CDATA[Honey and history]]> We have a tendency here to be fascinated with the new. Uh, we’re journalists. This whole beer tour was inspired by the explosion of new breweries in the county in the last few years. But celebrating Boulder’s beer is just as much about the long-standing as the new, and we’re certainly not ignorant of history.]]> <![CDATA[Upslope kicks into high gear]]> Upslope is trying to get their beer to the people with a just-announced list of upcoming spring and summer events. Boulder teetotalers will be tempted with a music festival, beer and food truck pairings, the chance to make earrings out of cans and tutorials on bike mechanics.]]> <![CDATA[beer tour]]> Oskar Blues is debuting the first ever American-made nitro craft beer in a can, called Old Chub Nitro Scotch Ale, during the upcoming Craft Brewers Conference in Denver on April 8.]]> <![CDATA[Colorado Craft Beer Week]]> The real, honest, fo’ realsies, no fooling, super-special one and only official Colorado Craft Beer Week runs Friday, March 21, through Saturday, March 29, and it’s packed to the beer-breathing gills with craft-brewed events for you to woot about from atop the most conveniently located 14er.]]> <![CDATA[Greenhouse gas]]> About the only thing Boulderites like to flaunt as much as the city’s plethora of microbreweries is its interest in sustainability. Too bad then that the brewing process creates a butt-ton of carbon dioxide (approximately 100 tons for a 10,000 barrel-ayear brewery), which means that enjoying a nice barrel-aged porter like a boss also means contributing to climate change like a salaried worker.]]> <![CDATA[Fort Collins Beer Week is nigh]]> Longmont’s Left Hand Brewing has started a run’n’chug series of its own, the “Beer Run” Running Club, which will be going down every Saturday from noon-1 p.m. “Each runner is encouraged to go at their own pace (if you want to walk instead of run, that is absolutely fine!),” Morgan Zamora, administrator for Left Hand Brewing wrote in a press release.]]> <![CDATA[Holiday beer guide]]> Why is it that most holiday beers are as dark as the early nights of winter, contain warming spices and have alcohol levels approaching that of wine? It’s likely because these complex-flavored beers pair well with the heavy meals and endless desserts we enjoy around the holidays.]]> <![CDATA[More malt magic]]> This time around, when the Boulder Weekly gang heads to Liquids & Solids, I’m surprised again: Not only does Oskar Blues do malt, about half the OB beers on tap are dark and delicious.]]> <![CDATA[Let them drink wine]]> Gutenberg’s printing press brought religion into the homes of millions. Copernicus, Galileo and Newton put science into the minds of even more. Fleming’s penicillin saved countless lives. But the island of Crete gave the world something much more valuable than all three combined: cheap wine.]]>