<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[Dispatch from the loud table]]> Weeks before we even conceived of a tour of Boulder County’s breweries, I made an uncomfortable discovery: When the Boulder Weekly staff goes out to eat — which is pretty often as we’re all wealthy and have tons of time — we’re the loud table.]]> <![CDATA[Sharing is caring]]> For better or worse, we live in a culture of sharing. We share our photos, our statuses, our relationship highs and lows, favorite recipes, workouts, selfies, DIY projects and even our meals. The rise of the Internet tapped into our innately social mindset, lit a fuse under it and exploded it across our screens for all to see. It’s no surprise the sharing mentality would eventually permeate our lives offline, as well.]]> <![CDATA[The cucumber crisis]]> But when Baile came by, we couldn’t help but ask whether the Cucumber Cream Ale was ready. Soon it was sitting in front of us, and I was, as I said, filled with fear, dread and doubt. And you thought writing about beer trips was all fun and games.]]> <![CDATA[Vapor Distillery is going big time]]> Boulder County lost one of its most highly decorated distilleries at the beginning of April, and that is a good thing. Roundhouse Spirits, distilling since 2008, has ceased to exist due to naming rights for their products and overall company. But don’t despair, because in its place is Vapor Distillery, and things are about to get bigger and better.]]> <![CDATA[Craft Sabbath]]> Beer and heavy metal are pretty obvious bedfellows. When one pictures the average headbanger, there’s usually a tall boy in his or her hand. While wine and spirits often have a pretentious veneer around them, beer is refreshing, satisfying and cures what ails you.]]> <![CDATA[Make it stop]]> Saturday morning in Boulder. Your eyes are bloodshot. Your mouth tastes like the venue. When you try to stand up, it feels like food poisoning on a ship in bad weather. But you promised yourself you wouldn’t waste this Saturday, given last weekend’s take out-and-Netflix-filled bacchanal.]]> <![CDATA[Barley, hops and gluten]]> Gluten is a protein in some grains, like wheat and barley, commonly used in pasta, bread and, yes, beer. Gluten-free diets started because of Celiac disease, a serious condition in which people can’t tolerate gluten. Currently, 1 in 133 people have Celiac and 7 percent of people report having non-Celiac sensitivity.]]> <![CDATA[Much ado about poison]]> In late March, two couples filed a class-action lawsuit in California alleging that some of the nation’s top-selling low-cost wines contain unsafe levels of arsenic. “Just a glass or two” of wine from producers like Cupcake, Charles Shaw, Franzia, Rex Goliath and Korbel “could result in dangerous arsenic toxicity,” according to the suit.]]> <![CDATA[Straight from the brewer’s mouth]]> In the summertime, people drink more beer, and we drink more session beers. Session beers could be any style, but have relatively low alcohol (usually around or below 5 percent ABV), and therefore, they make it easy to toss back a few. Many of our local breweries have been kind enough to offer up session beers for us to sip on all summer long.]]> <![CDATA[American agave]]> Tatanka is an American alternative to Mexican tequila, which uses the fermented sap of the agave plant. Agave — a large succulent not to be confused as a type of cactus — is similar in appearance to aloe with its long, flat leaves covered in spines. Blue weber agave, or Agave tequilana, is responsible for the production of tequila.]]> <![CDATA[Bucca-nerd]]> The more of his rum I drank, the more he looked like Bill Gates. Greg Starr leads our little group of reporters around his new distillery in Gunbarrel, eagerly explaining the process by which he produces white rum. Starr has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering, owns 25 patents and has coauthored two books on “semiconductor design methodologies,” a term that so rattles the intelligence of the layman by its mere existence that centuries ago Starr surely would’ve burned at the stake by the order of John Proctor.]]> <![CDATA[The booze boom in entertainment]]> Craft brewing has been around for 500 years. In the past decade, though, it’s taken off — especially in the United States. The appeal is obvious. Smaller batch sizes and creative recipes lend the craft brew flavors (and identities) that Budweiser can’t match.]]> <![CDATA[This hound will hunt]]> Some people just don’t know when to stop; they keep on trying despite the roadblocks that are tossed in their path. Spirit Hound Distillers in Lyons is full of people like that.]]> <![CDATA[D-Day at The Post Brewing Company]]> The official concept for The Post is simple: “beer and chicken.” Buckets and buckets of chicken.]]> <![CDATA[The saga continues]]> <![CDATA[Drinking pink]]> As a kid, I was aware that a pink wine called white zinfandel existed, but my dad considered it crap. That memory lasted well into my adulthood: Don’t buy pink wine because it’s garbage. Fast forward to five years ago or so, and you’ll find entire rows of rosť in liquor stores and a deep craving for it by wine enthusiasts as we approach summer.]]> <![CDATA[The great forgotten Italian red]]> Far be it from me to dispute that. I don’t know how, and I’m scared to. But in that due bluster around nebbiolo and sangiovese, and their subsequent products, it’s hard to find on Boulder County menus what some of us hiding over in the corner consider Italy’s finest red: amarone della Valpolicella.]]> <![CDATA[Celebrate a local favorite]]> Hop lovers rejoice; there is a festival highlighting those bitter, intense beers you know and love. Boulder’s JUL-IPA brings together more than 30 breweries, both locally and nationally based, to pour India Pale Ales for your drinking pleasure.]]> <![CDATA[It’s medal time]]> The first Great American Beer Festival (GABF) was held in the Harvest House Hotel in Boulder in 1982. The motley collection of 22 breweries brought 40 beers, and the 800 people in attendance can say they sampled the beginning of the craft beer revolution.]]> <![CDATA[A new wine frontier emerges]]> Finger Lakes’ wine pioneer Hermann Wiemer released his first wine 35 years ago. While his wines helped the New York region gain critical acclaim, he never curried much favor with local winemakers. And he had little patience for collegiality. In a 1985 interview with the New York Times, he described most Finger Lakes wine as “rubber hose” quality. ]]>