<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[Lots to learn: The beer tour hits Wynkoop Brewing Company]]> I can’t talk about Wynkoop Brewing Company without talking about history. But enough has been written already about Wynkoop’s history, and anyway when I think of Wynkoop and history I’m really — as I am so often — talking about myself.]]> <![CDATA[Trouble brewing]]> I mean, I knew I wasn’t in the best shape. I’m basically built like Animal from the Muppets, with the strength of Animal from the Muppets, my weird, fuzzy arms flopping about wildly.]]> <![CDATA[Barrel racing]]> America has a history of trying to one-up the rest of the world. Maybe it has something to do with our rebellious origins. Maybe that explains monster trucks, KISS and deep dish pizza. So it only makes sense that when the craft brewing revolution started more than 20 years ago it was driven by American brewers.]]> <![CDATA[Starting strong with a strong ale]]> A strong ale will solve it. That was the mantra as I more or less fled the Boulder Weekly office for Asher Brewing Company in Gunbarrel the afternoon of Jan. 3.]]> <![CDATA[Explosive combinations]]> Learning about beer flavor isn’t limited to the monthly “Niwot Drinking Buddy” classes, however. Powder Keg’s Haystack Hopback is a class in a glass.]]> <![CDATA[Bitchin’ brews]]> This week’s beer tour takes us back to a time when pants could moonlight as parachutes and Frankie asked us to relax. (Full disclosure: I was born in 1985, so I’m not actually qualified to make any statements about life in the ’80s. Without Googling, I couldn’t tell you who Frankie was or why he wanted us to relax.]]> <![CDATA[Colorado Craft Beer Week]]> The real, honest, fo’ realsies, no fooling, super-special one and only official Colorado Craft Beer Week runs Friday, March 21, through Saturday, March 29, and it’s packed to the beer-breathing gills with craft-brewed events for you to woot about from atop the most conveniently located 14er.]]> <![CDATA[The beer battles]]> There’s a lot of sharing on our beer tour. When I describe six of a brewery’s beers in this column, I didn’t order six beers. I just brought five people. We pass everything around, and even trade or give away beers we don’t care for.]]> <![CDATA[Barley, hops and gluten]]> Gluten is a protein in some grains, like wheat and barley, commonly used in pasta, bread and, yes, beer. Gluten-free diets started because of Celiac disease, a serious condition in which people can’t tolerate gluten. Currently, 1 in 133 people have Celiac and 7 percent of people report having non-Celiac sensitivity.]]> <![CDATA[A column about beer]]> Savor, dear readers, the rare industry that doesn’t require constant branding and marketing. There are tons of opportunity for branding in the craft beer industry, of course, but there isn’t a pathological need for it like with cars or cookies or coffee or most everything you can think of.]]> <![CDATA[Beer beyond Boulder County]]> Yes, with last week’s visit to Front Range Brewing Company, Boulder Weekly staff had spent an afternoon — and in many cases, a lot more than that — in every Boulder County brewery that has a tasting room.]]> <![CDATA[Cask-conditioned ales: Keeping it real]]> I can remember the feeling, not so long ago, of sitting down at a bar with a decent craft beer selection and being bewildered.]]> <![CDATA[Back to basics at BJ’s]]> Ten minutes into our visit to BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse, our tour of Boulder County breweries becomes a roller coaster.]]> <![CDATA[Out front at Front Range Brewing Company]]> Artisan craft brewers have wider interests than their audience.]]> <![CDATA[It’s medal time]]> The first Great American Beer Festival (GABF) was held in the Harvest House Hotel in Boulder in 1982. The motley collection of 22 breweries brought 40 beers, and the 800 people in attendance can say they sampled the beginning of the craft beer revolution.]]> <![CDATA[Summer of suds]]> Boulder County’s craft beer explosion isn’t done yet — or that’s the assumption for the owners of a new wave of breweries-in-planning that are shooting to open this year. We count at least eight breweries that have made some degree of progress toward opening.]]> <![CDATA[D-Day at The Post Brewing Company]]> The official concept for The Post is simple: “beer and chicken.” Buckets and buckets of chicken.]]> <![CDATA[Fate Brewing Company floats a summer special]]> Many breweries are ushering in the season with lighter summer fare, like Boulder Beer’s Hoopla, their dry-hopped festival beer. Others are planning to celebrate the season with one-off events like Avery’s Four on the Fourth 4K race, in which runners can compete before enjoying beer and breakfast burritos.]]> <![CDATA[Drink what you love — and what you don't]]> Brewery taprooms are one of the very few places — dentists’ offices being the other I can think of — where people often ask for things they won’t like.]]> <![CDATA[Magic is in the air at Shine]]> Much is made of Boulder County, and particularly the city, being different from the rest of the country. I can’t speak to that as a whole, but I can say it’s pretty different from my hometown in Northeast Ohio. And nowhere was that more apparent than Shine Restaurant & Gathering Place.]]>