<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[Boulder Weekly beer tour]]> Oskar Blues’ latest venture is, at first glance, a rather odd mash-up: Bikes, tacos and tequila. Oh, and beer, of course. And yet somehow, in OB’s typical Midas touch fashion, it all works.]]> <![CDATA[beer tour]]> Oskar Blues is debuting the first ever American-made nitro craft beer in a can, called Old Chub Nitro Scotch Ale, during the upcoming Craft Brewers Conference in Denver on April 8.]]> <![CDATA[The saga continues]]> <![CDATA[At Longmont's Oskar Blues, a malty mea culpa]]> I am sorry for not liking Oskar Blues. I am sorry to you, the reader, and to the beer itself.]]> <![CDATA[Starting strong with a strong ale]]> A strong ale will solve it. That was the mantra as I more or less fled the Boulder Weekly office for Asher Brewing Company in Gunbarrel the afternoon of Jan. 3.]]> <![CDATA[Fate Brewing Company floats a summer special]]> Many breweries are ushering in the season with lighter summer fare, like Boulder Beer’s Hoopla, their dry-hopped festival beer. Others are planning to celebrate the season with one-off events like Avery’s Four on the Fourth 4K race, in which runners can compete before enjoying beer and breakfast burritos.]]> <![CDATA[Colorado’s beer scene is getting crowded]]> When Upslope brewing opened its doors in 2008, it was the first new brewery in Boulder in over a decade. Its approach was simple: wellcrafted approachable beer served in cans; the labels simply stated the style: pale ale, IPA, craft lager, etc.]]> <![CDATA[Boulder Beer turns 35]]> Between wacky recipes, oddball marketing and all manner of shenaniganry, it isn’t just the alcohol that makes the corporate identity of most breweries seem fairly adolescent. But can you blame ‘em? It’s not quite The Children of the Corn, but only a handful of breweries are out of their teens. The elder statesman of Colorado breweries, Boulder Beer, is only 35. And barely 35 at that. Its birthday is this weekend.]]> <![CDATA[Colorado beers get royal treatment out of state]]> Colorado beers that are “common but a little pricey” in the Centennial State are “so expensive they’re delicacies” here in Chicago.]]> <![CDATA[Tiny bubbles]]> It’s easy enough to name the most obvious trends in Boulder County brewing. Three breweries are planning to open this summer in Lafayette; Boulder loves beer that’s heavy on the hops; barrel-aging is big.]]> <![CDATA[Pumpkin beer is here]]> Pumpkin ales are as highly anticipated as any seasonal beer, neck-and-neck with Christmas ales. But it’s a style fraught with problems.]]> <![CDATA[Cask-conditioned ales: Keeping it real]]> I can remember the feeling, not so long ago, of sitting down at a bar with a decent craft beer selection and being bewildered.]]> <![CDATA[Hello, happy place]]> Five minutes into my visit to Our Mutual Friend, the bartender takes the needle off the record and switches the stereo input to his Mac laptop. The first hi-hat clicks and falsetto wails of “A Life of Possibilities” come out, and I love this bar.]]> <![CDATA[The apple doesn’t fall far]]> With the temperatures rising, Coloradans are reaching for unlikely refreshment: ice-cold cider. Yes, cider; a drink that was last popular when America was fighting the Civil War.]]> <![CDATA[Why breweries shouldn't make Super Bowl bets]]> After a drubbing so severe that Comedy Central’s Jon Stewart called it “the Seahawks ‘bring a Bronco to work day,’’’ Downtown Boulder’s West Flanders Brewing has to make good on the Super Bowl bet it made with Seattle’s Elysian Brewing.]]> <![CDATA[The Magical Ingredient]]> Last year, thirsty Americans enjoyed almost 9.5 million barrels of beer. That’s a lot of beer! Every time one of them cracked a can or popped the top on their favorite brewski, they unknowingly paid homage to the side effects of Humulus lupulus.]]> <![CDATA[Bitchin’ brews]]> This week’s beer tour takes us back to a time when pants could moonlight as parachutes and Frankie asked us to relax. (Full disclosure: I was born in 1985, so I’m not actually qualified to make any statements about life in the ’80s. Without Googling, I couldn’t tell you who Frankie was or why he wanted us to relax.]]> <![CDATA[A column about beer]]> Savor, dear readers, the rare industry that doesn’t require constant branding and marketing. There are tons of opportunity for branding in the craft beer industry, of course, but there isn’t a pathological need for it like with cars or cookies or coffee or most everything you can think of.]]> <![CDATA[Out front at Front Range Brewing Company]]> Artisan craft brewers have wider interests than their audience.]]> <![CDATA[Honey and history]]> We have a tendency here to be fascinated with the new. Uh, we’re journalists. This whole beer tour was inspired by the explosion of new breweries in the county in the last few years. But celebrating Boulder’s beer is just as much about the long-standing as the new, and we’re certainly not ignorant of history.]]>