<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Boulder Weekly Beer Tour]]> <![CDATA[Colorado’s beer scene is getting crowded]]> When Upslope brewing opened its doors in 2008, it was the first new brewery in Boulder in over a decade. Its approach was simple: wellcrafted approachable beer served in cans; the labels simply stated the style: pale ale, IPA, craft lager, etc.]]> <![CDATA[Brewery burnout]]> At some point, I think we all lost the ability to identify beer flavors.]]> <![CDATA[Fruitful]]> The previous two years of wine production in Colorado were poor. There was some doubt many of the vineyards and farms in Colorado’s high country, along the Colorado River, would recover this year. However, this year brought optimal growing weather for nearly all of the state’s producers, and Boulder County wineries are excited about the rebound.]]> <![CDATA[Saving Sauternes]]> Olivier Bernard knows Bordeaux. Born there in 1960, Bernard has spent his entire life in the region — and worked in the wine industry since 1978 when he opened a small wine shop. In 1983, he took over the operations at Domaine de Chevalier after his family purchased the historic estate in Pessac- Léognan. And he has been president of the Union des Grands Cru, the promotional body for Bordeaux’s top producers, since 2012.]]> <![CDATA[Barley, hops and gluten]]> Gluten is a protein in some grains, like wheat and barley, commonly used in pasta, bread and, yes, beer. Gluten-free diets started because of Celiac disease, a serious condition in which people can’t tolerate gluten. Currently, 1 in 133 people have Celiac and 7 percent of people report having non-Celiac sensitivity.]]> <![CDATA[Farewell, Planet Porter]]> Fare thee well, sweet Planet Porter. But when one brave soldier falls by the wayside, others arise to take its place. Here are some of the most interesting beers being released at local breweries this week or this week adjacent.]]> <![CDATA[Yeast on Main Street]]> Louisville’s Main Street is such an ideal small-town drag that it looks like it was pulled from The Truman Show. But it now has full credentials as a Colorado Main Street, as on June 26 it picked up the missing ingredient: a craft brewery. Belgian-centric brewery Twelve Degree Brewing Company, founded by head brewer Jon Howland, has popped up in the Main Street Marketplace next to the Empire and across from the Rex.]]> <![CDATA[The beer battles]]> There’s a lot of sharing on our beer tour. When I describe six of a brewery’s beers in this column, I didn’t order six beers. I just brought five people. We pass everything around, and even trade or give away beers we don’t care for.]]> <![CDATA[Gluten-free and nationwide]]> Gluten-free New Planet Brewing recently announced a joint venture with United States Beverage LLC, the national distributor responsible for beers like Murphy’s, Black Dog Ales, Czechvar and more, meaning New Planet Beer is about to get its shot at the big time.]]> <![CDATA[Digging for gold]]> Erie may not be the correct spelling, but it’s the perfect word for the experience. On a chilly, October evening, the dark storefronts and empty sidewalks of this old town strip of the small East Boulder/Weld County town didn’t need much in the way of Halloween decorations to evoke the feel of a western ghost town.]]> <![CDATA[Saddle up for a trip to Boulder's newest taproom]]> Louisville is the newest outer province of Russia, if new Louisville brewery Crystal Springs Brewing is any indication. Crystal Springs brews a Russian imperial stout, Black Saddle, along with about a dozen other beers at any given time.]]> <![CDATA[Colorado beers get royal treatment out of state]]> Colorado beers that are “common but a little pricey” in the Centennial State are “so expensive they’re delicacies” here in Chicago.]]> <![CDATA[More malt magic]]> This time around, when the Boulder Weekly gang heads to Liquids & Solids, I’m surprised again: Not only does Oskar Blues do malt, about half the OB beers on tap are dark and delicious.]]> <![CDATA[Lots to learn: The beer tour hits Wynkoop Brewing Company]]> I can’t talk about Wynkoop Brewing Company without talking about history. But enough has been written already about Wynkoop’s history, and anyway when I think of Wynkoop and history I’m really — as I am so often — talking about myself.]]> <![CDATA[So long, Boulder, and thanks for all the beer]]> On a Friday afternoon, the tasters stretch out for a lot longer than necessary — and yes, lunch hour beers are necessary. We’re working here, after all.]]> <![CDATA[The other alchemists]]> Stout Month. Sourfest. Rocket in My Beer Fest (yes, that’s a real thing). Even when they’re almost comically hyper-specific, Colorado isn’t exactly short on beer festivals.]]> <![CDATA[Tour de drink]]> Memorial Day weekend, to many, represents the start of summer. In Boulder and eight other cities, it also means the start of a summer of imbibing all across town with a pocket-sized booklet, or “Passport,” that invites you to explore bars, restaurants, wineries, distilleries and breweries, old and new, downtown and around town.]]> <![CDATA[Drinking pink]]> As a kid, I was aware that a pink wine called white zinfandel existed, but my dad considered it crap. That memory lasted well into my adulthood: Don’t buy pink wine because it’s garbage. Fast forward to five years ago or so, and you’ll find entire rows of rosé in liquor stores and a deep craving for it by wine enthusiasts as we approach summer.]]> <![CDATA[Bordeaux’s hidden gems]]> Fortunately, four close friends shared my interest in wine. So we gathered at my house to explore the wines of France. Each attendee was tasked with purchasing a $35 to $50 bottle from Champagne, Burgundy or the Rhône Valley. I volunteered to spend $135 on a “trophy” wine from Bordeaux.]]> <![CDATA[Stout Month and beyond]]> Also going down at Avery this week is All You Need is a Beer, a paired beer and chocolate tasteapalooza that will include no shortage of yakking about the history, culture and “health benefits” of chocobooze combos.]]>