<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - 1,000-Issue Review]]> <![CDATA[Genetically modified organisms (GMOs)]]> For a lot of folks in Boulder County, the subject of GMOs became a hot button issue in the past two years or so, as heated debates about whether genetically engineered sugar beets should be allowed to be grown on publicly owned open space broke out in packed rooms before our county commissioners.]]> <![CDATA[Fracking in Boulder County]]> Jefferson Dodge’s first story on fracking, “What the frack?: Controversial oil/ gas drilling digs in around Boulder County” from Oct. 27, 2011, introduced BW readers to hydraulic fracturing, which was gathering attention from environmentalists due to the use of chemicals that might affect groundwater.]]> <![CDATA[Until proven guilty]]> White says she decided to open the piece with a description of the living conditions of death-row inmate Scott Peterson, who was convicted of killing his pregnant wife, Laci Peterson, in 2002, because some teens have it worse — and that’s just while they are waiting for trial.]]> <![CDATA[Why are we so hated?]]> In the piece, White explored the possible motivations behind the 9/11 attacks by interviewing local policy experts and activists, including CU religious studies professor Ira Chernus.]]> <![CDATA[Jagged little pills]]> The common denominator among Pogany and Howell, and scores of other soldiers who had extreme, often violent reactions to their service? They had taken Lariam.]]> <![CDATA[Deadly ground]]> Boulder Weekly’s investigation discovered that Beech officials knew of the likely contamination long before the 1988 sale to the city.]]> <![CDATA[Cover up]]> “Cover up” involved Syntex Chemicals, a Boulder-based pharmaceutical plant that ranked among the worst polluters in the state.]]> <![CDATA[A SANE response to rape]]> When former BW Editor Pamela White heard about a teenager who was sexually assaulted and then had to stay in an emergency room waiting area for hours before being seen, she was horrified.]]> <![CDATA[Inside the people pound]]> Despite the fact that many of those detained by ICE have committed no crime other than being in the country illegally, White asked why they are treated very much like hardened criminals in a state prison or county jail.]]> <![CDATA[Nedergate]]> Shortridge told the Weekly’s Wayne Laugesen that the three men had been offering him the Nederland mayor’s position as well as financial considerations if he would attend the board meetings, get them appointed to the board and publicly apologize for the comments he had made while opposing them.]]> <![CDATA[AIDS: A retrospective]]> Of all the groundbreaking, boundary-pushing stories that former Editor Pamela White wrote during her 10 years at the Weekly, she seems to speak with special fondness for the series she did on the history of AIDS in Boulder County.]]> <![CDATA[The house that graft built]]> By carefully investigating city records for months, Rosen discovered a web of corruption, all leading to one man, Jim Butterfield, then-construction manager for the City of Boulder Housing Authority.]]> <![CDATA[Who’s watching your kids?]]> Boulder’s rec centers have long been a favorite year-round hangout for the city’s families and for children. As Boulder Weekly discovered during this impressive investigation by Richard Fleming, the East Boulder Recreation Center was, in 1995, likewise a popular hangout for perverts who targeted children.]]> <![CDATA[Concrete evidence]]> The first thing former Weekly Editor Pamela White mentions when asked about her November 2003 exposť on the Cemex plant near Lyons is the Thermos. A Cemex employee-turned-whistleblower had installed a video camera in the bottom of a Thermos to surreptitiously record what he claimed was evidence of health and safety violations.]]> <![CDATA[Dying in our streets]]> The job of journalists is to “comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.” In November 1995, it would have been hard to find anyone in Boulder more afflicted and uncomfortable than Anita Belletti.]]> <![CDATA[From ‘Woman in chains’ to ‘Pregnant in prison’]]> The story was called “Woman in chains,” and it was about an inmate who went into labor prematurely but was denied medical attention — and even reportedly teased by guards who thought she was faking it. Turns out, she wasn’t faking.]]> <![CDATA[Ghosts of Valmont Butte]]> In a 10-part series (totaling more than 37,000 words) that spanned six months, Boulder Weekly reported on the historical, cultural and scenic significance of a local landmark that has been reduced to a permanent site for the storage of toxic and radioactive waste.]]> <![CDATA[Boulder Weekly celebrates its 1,000th issue with a look back on our top 25 stories]]> In celebration of our 1,000-week milestone, we have chosen examples of some of our most important news stories to reflect back upon.]]> <![CDATA[Who is tailing you?]]> On July 6, 2003, two Boulder residents found sophisticated global positioning system (GPS) tracking devices attached to the bottom of their cars, and then-BW Editor Pamela White says the story broke national news about federal agents being suspected of monitoring individuals’ whereabouts.]]> <![CDATA[On the run]]> Richard Keyes was a 21-year-old anti-government adherent who was involved in the kidnapping of a couple of people who lived down the road from the Republic of Texas Compound near Fort Davis, Texas. The kidnapping led to a six-day standoff with Texas rangers and federal authorities.]]>