<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Weed Between the Lines]]> <![CDATA[As it turns out, marijuana doesn’t like cancer]]> When first experimenting in the 1970s, I immediately began reading everything I could on the subject of marijuana. And right from the beginning, what I was finding, especially the material coming from the newly minted Drug Enforcement Agency, was not in sync with what I was experiencing with the product.]]> <![CDATA[Too much medical marijuana can make you sick]]> I read as much as I can about cannabis, but I had never found anything, even anecdotally, like this. And even medical doctors, including some who suggest it for chemotherapy patients, know cannabis for its nausea-quelling properties.]]> <![CDATA[Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 rises from the dead]]> Now, a similar monster is being revived by the Colorado legislature as the Marijuana Tax Act of 2013, now known as Proposition AA.]]> <![CDATA[A historic Congressional cannabis vote … or not?]]> The Rohrabacher-Farr amendment to the 2015 Commerce, Justice and Science Appropriations Bill (HR 4660) passed Friday in the U.S. House of Representatives.]]> <![CDATA[Jonathan Singer an unlikely cannabis advocate]]> “If someone had told me in 2011 that three years later I would be running for re-election for a seat I didn’t have,” Singer, who rebelled in high school by not using cannabis, said recently. “Or that by the end of my second year that I would have helped pass a statewide tax increase on legal marijuana, I would have laughed at them.]]> <![CDATA[High hopes for improved reporting on teen marijuana use]]> When Rocky Mountain Community Radio reporter Bente Birkeland began tracking legal marijuana’s impacts on Colorado teenagers earlier this year, she discovered key data wasn’t available. “The state does not require schools to report marijuana incidents separately,” Birkeland says. “Alcohol and tobacco are in separate categories. But marijuana shouldn’t be lumped in with cocaine or pharmaceuticals. It’s a tough story to report.”]]> <![CDATA[Tax debate highlights rift in cannabis movement]]> On Sept. 23, there was a “free joint giveaway” on the Boulder Pearl Street Mall that was organized by the “No on Proposition AA Committee.” More than 1,000 cannabis cigarettes were given away to call attention to the marijuana tax issue that will appear on the Nov. 5 ballot.]]> <![CDATA[Could Boulder price itself out of the pot market?]]> I support taxes on sales of marijuana, but I’m scratching my head a little over the latest proposal before the Boulder City Council to place a 15 percent city excise tax on grow and infusion facilities and a 10 percent city sales tax on marijuana on the November ballot.]]> <![CDATA[Is Denver ready to allow limited public cannabis consumption?]]> A recent survey from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment found that 13.6 percent of Coloradans admitted to using marijuana in the last month, about twice the 7.4 percent of Americans who acknowledge using cannabis on national surveys.]]> <![CDATA[National news finally taking cannabis legalization seriously]]> “I think even after the election, if I’d had a magic wand, and I could wave the wand, I probably would’ve reversed it and had the initiative fail,” he admitted to Whitaker. “But now I look at it, and I think we’ve made a lot of progress. I think we might actually create a system that can work.]]> <![CDATA[State cannabis campaign based on information, not retribution]]> Have you seen the Good to Know Colorado marijuana ads on television? They use colorful cartoon characters, whimsical illustrations and a friendly, folksy voice that offers basic information about legalization. “Instead of telling you what you can’t do, we’re going to tell you what you can do, too.]]> <![CDATA[How will I know if I’m one toke over the line?]]> Although I’m generally encouraged about the rules and regulations passed by the Colorado Legislature to regulate marijuana like alcohol this month, the rule that still bothers me allows a jury to infer that someone whose blood level shows five nanograms of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) per milliliter to be impaired or intoxicated.]]> <![CDATA[Eric Holder’s mixed record on cannabis reform]]> Eric Holder tendered his resignation last week, though he will stay in office until a successor is chosen for the attorney general position. Given congressional inertia on presidential nominees, he could still fill out Obama’s term, so I’m not holding my breath.]]> <![CDATA[Boulder marijuana sales tax revenues on the rise]]> The City of Boulder released its latest sales and use tax revenue report in July. It compares tax revenues from January to May of 2014 to the same period this year. The numbers show that Boulder is booming. Total sales tax revenue is up an impressive 6 percent from the first five months of last year, with computer-related businesses up 31 percent; Gunbarrel commercial by 20 percent; food stores and downtown Boulder by almost 11 percent each.]]> <![CDATA[Oregon’s legalization process begins]]> On Wednesday, Measure 91, the first part of the ballot initiative approved by 56 percent of Oregon voters in November, officially took effect. The state, which, in 1998 became the second to pass a medical marijuana statute, joins Colorado, Washington and Alaska (whose law went into effect in February) in decriminalizing adult possession of marijuana.]]> <![CDATA[Medical cannabis heads toward the tipping point]]> Weed, the CNN documentary anchored by Dr. Sanjay Gupta that aired last summer, highlighted the case of Charlotte Figi, a Colorado girl whose epileptic seizures were calmed by use of a special strain of cannabis high in cannabidiol, or CBD, a cannabinoid associated with the plant’s medical properties.]]> <![CDATA[It’s time to let Boulder cannabis businesses succeed]]> Having lived here nearly half tated strict timelines for rulemaking. Take the city’s coupon ban. This my life, I frequent local But a close look at the city rules on makes no sense whatsoever. Currently, businesses and want them marijuana is confusing at best.]]> <![CDATA[A cannabis ad campaign designed to educate, not frighten]]> New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd took some serious shit earlier this year for a piece she wrote about her scary experience in a Denver hotel room after an overdose of cannabis edibles. She was mocked for being stupid, for not reading the packaging, for not waiting long enough before eating more. And of being sanctimonious and selfrighteous about it, too.]]> <![CDATA[The myth of super pot]]> It’s not your grandfather’s pot,” I keep hearing. Every time I attend a forum or turn on the TV or the Internet, there’s somebody saying that today’s marijuana is fearfully strong and therefore much more dangerous than it used to be. “Studies reveal that marijuana potency has almost tripled over the past 20 years,” it says right on www.]]> <![CDATA[A New Leaf chronicles the demise of prohibition]]> “I’m from upstate New York, and I traveled to California,” Martin said during a recent interview. “I had never been to Venice Beach. I opened the car door and smelled marijuana and asked how they were able to have it. They said it was legal there. It was immediately the kind of federal-state clash that attracted me.]]>