<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Weed Between the Lines]]> <![CDATA[The limits to legislating cannabis edibles]]> The state of Colorado got generally high marks for its initial rollout of recreational cannabis from a Brookings Institute report released last week.]]> <![CDATA[Local attorney argues fed laws don’t apply to MMJ]]> Boulder attorney Andrew Reid of the law firm Springer & Steinberg, on behalf of Nederland area resident Kathleen Chippi and the Patient and Caregiver Rights Litigation Project (PCRLP), has filed an amicus curiae (“friend of the court”) brief to the...]]> <![CDATA[The Obama drug war budget and the definition of insanity]]> The words were encouraging, especially coming from the surgeon general of the United States. “We have some preliminary data showing that for certain medical conditions and symptoms that marijuana can be helpful.]]> <![CDATA[The myth of cannabis and teens]]> The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), managed by the national Centers for Disease Control, analyzes health-risk behaviors of youth and adults every two years and though not inclusive, assembles data given by students themselves about their habits and concerns.]]> <![CDATA[The golden years just might go better with pot]]> So you’re one of the 13 percent of Boulderites who are over 55 years of age. It’s been almost a year and a half since marijuana legalization, and you’ve sat on the sidelines watching the experiment unfold. Maybe you tried it in college. Perhaps you weren’t willing to break the law when it was illegal.]]> <![CDATA[Hemp and the woolly mammoth’s hair piece]]> It’s no secret that hemp is one of the most misunderstood plants in history. For centuries, it has been used by all kinds of people for all kinds of things — clothing to car construction, bioplastics to building supplies, food to fuel. Though it was grown by the Founding Fathers, was a major crop in the U.S. for many years and doesn’t contain enough THC to get people “high,” it was blacklisted along with marijuana in 1937 and later listed as a Schedule One drug under the Controlled Substances Act in 1970, at least in part because the federal government couldn’t tell the difference between the two plants.]]> <![CDATA[Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 rises from the dead]]> Now, a similar monster is being revived by the Colorado legislature as the Marijuana Tax Act of 2013, now known as Proposition AA.]]> <![CDATA[Rep. Jonathan Singer, Jack’s Bill and TABOR restrictions]]> When I interviewed Rep. Jonathan Singer last October, he was gearing up for the 2015 legislative session. It adjourned in May, and I decided to check in and find out more about what happened this time around. ]]> <![CDATA[Safe Streets Alliance wants cannabis back with criminals]]> About the time you think things couldn’t get any crazier in the American crazyquilt approach to cannabis: Last Thursday two lawsuits were filed against the state of Colorado to shut down legal marijuana, alleging that all legal marijuana businesses are illegal under the federal racketeering act. The next day, two U.S. congressmen introduced bills that would set up a regulatory approach to cannabis on a federal level.]]> <![CDATA[Colorado says ‘no’ to medical marijuana for post-traumatic stress]]> John Evans insists that calling post-traumatic stress a disorder is like cutting yourself and calling the blood a disorder. “It is a natural reaction to an unnatural event,” says Evans, director of support group Veterans 4 Freedom. Not only military veterans, but women who have suffered domestic abuse or sexual assault, hospice workers, EMTs, firefighters, police officers and even those affected by natural disasters can have post-traumatic stress, he believes.]]> <![CDATA[Are last week's medical marijuana busts a sign of weakness or strength?]]> From what we have found out since then — and I’m writing this on the morning of Nov. 25 — it appears that the raids were focused on certain individuals whom the Justice Department suspects broke one or more of the guidelines.]]> <![CDATA[Move over, Ebola: What you should panic about this week]]> Several major news outlets (including Fox and CBS) recently claimed that Colorado-based CB Scientific designed a product for parents to test Halloween candy for marijuana. That’s not accurate, says CB Scientific co-founder Derek Lebahn. His company actually developed these testkits for medical patients and plant breeders. They released them in September. Lebahn contacted a local CBS reporter, but he wasn’t interested.]]> <![CDATA[Rep. Singer talks edibles, banking and lawmakers]]> In part one of my interview with Rep. Jonathan Singer last week, he talked about changes the Colorado legislature made to Amendment 64 during the 2015 session. He figures lawmakers will be revising cannabis laws for a long time to come. “These are some of the million tweaks we will be making because we are a growing society,” said Singer, the representative for House District 11. “I ran three liquor bills this year. We’ve had legal liquor in the state for almost a century, and we’re still perfecting it.”]]> <![CDATA[Boulder Valley schools won’t support Gov’s ‘rat cages’ campaign]]> As you probably know by now, the Governor’s Office has launched a “Don’t Be A Lab Rat” campaign. Targeted at 12- to 15-year-olds, it kicked off Aug. 11 with lots of TV coverage, as well as ads on YouTube and before films in movie theaters. Large human-sized cages, complete with giant plastic Leland Rucker.]]> <![CDATA[‘Gazette’ cannabis package serves up purple haze]]> The Gazette in Colorado Springs last week published a package about cannabis legalization in the state under the banner “Clearing the Haze.” The paper has been known for its excellent journalism and its reporters honored for their work, most recently a Pulitzer last year for a news series exposing how easily veterans can lose benefits for minor offenses after their discharge. A comprehensive series on the pros and cons of marijuana legalization is something Coloradans are always seeking.]]> <![CDATA[Is the cannabis dialogue out of control?]]> I had read the stories about the license plates. The profiling of Colorado drivers. Especially when using Interstate 76, the highway that connects Colorado to Interstate 80 in Nebraska.]]> <![CDATA[Could there be an agency more inept than the DEA?]]> Yes, you read that right. Let it settle in for a minute. Most of the cannabis used in the United States over the last decades has come from south of the border. Anyone who has used cannabis over the years remembers Mexican marijuana: Seedy, not a lot of buds or very strong, but plentiful and cheap.]]> <![CDATA[Will CU become the center of the universe for cannabis?]]> How cool would it be if CU becomes the major center for research into the cannabis plant? A CU team under the leadership of Professor Nolan Kane of the ecology and evolutionary biology department has begun a project to develop a genetic map of the Cannabis genus.]]> <![CDATA[Is it really this hard to come up with retail cannabis rules and regs?]]> The city is now close to passing rules and regulations that will govern the sale of retail cannabis in Boulder.]]> <![CDATA[One author’s cannabis journey of discovery]]> When Bruce Barcott began to research a book about the legalization of marijuana in the United States, one of the first things that concerned him was how he was going to talk with his children about it. An author and science writer whose work appears in The New York Times and Atlantic Monthly, Barcott, like many Americans, was a novice about cannabis, apathetic until he had to vote for or against legalization in Washington in 2012, his knowledge limited mostly to its longtime status as a drug promoted as being more dangerous than cocaine or methamphetamine by the federal government.]]>