<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Weed Between the Lines]]> <![CDATA[State cannabis campaign based on information, not retribution]]> Have you seen the Good to Know Colorado marijuana ads on television? They use colorful cartoon characters, whimsical illustrations and a friendly, folksy voice that offers basic information about legalization. “Instead of telling you what you can’t do, we’re going to tell you what you can do, too.]]> <![CDATA[Finally, some cannabis research worth waiting for]]> The state’s Public Health Department is recommending more than $7 million in grant money for eight studies centered on research into both the safety of cannabis and the possibilities for its use as a treatment for symptoms of various ailments and diseases.]]> <![CDATA[A new kind of mile-high club opens in Nederland]]> <![CDATA[‘Dude, I think this whole town is high’]]> One of the rules to be reviewed currently doesn’t allow retail shops to sell any marijuana-related merchandising.]]> <![CDATA[Creating a national cannabis brand might be harder than you think]]> I ran across several stories about Bethenny Frankel, a reality show personality, who, after apparently being spotted coming out of an Aspen dispensary and tweeting her delight at the experience, is rumored to be wanting to cash in on the cannabis business.]]> <![CDATA[Honoring Colorado’s early cannabis entrepreneurs]]> There’s a lot of talk these days about cannabis and big business. Corporate entities, cigarette companies and other greedy, moneyed interests, the reasoning goes, are poised to swoop in and kill off the local folks who built the cannabis industry and turn it into just another corporate product.]]> <![CDATA[The cannabis debate drifts into the halls of Congress]]> Last week I wrote about a bill that was then being debated in the Utah state legislature. S.B. 259 would have amended a law passed last year that allowed Utah citizens to use certain strains of CBD-dominate cannabis to treat medical conditions but mandated no legal way that patients could obtain them.]]> <![CDATA[Safe Streets Alliance wants cannabis back with criminals]]> About the time you think things couldn’t get any crazier in the American crazyquilt approach to cannabis: Last Thursday two lawsuits were filed against the state of Colorado to shut down legal marijuana, alleging that all legal marijuana businesses are illegal under the federal racketeering act. The next day, two U.S. congressmen introduced bills that would set up a regulatory approach to cannabis on a federal level.]]> <![CDATA[A historic Congressional cannabis vote … or not?]]> The Rohrabacher-Farr amendment to the 2015 Commerce, Justice and Science Appropriations Bill (HR 4660) passed Friday in the U.S. House of Representatives.]]> <![CDATA[Commercial cannabis at six months: The sky hasn’t fallen]]> We are just past the six-month point in the state’s roll-out of commercial sales of cannabis, and from all indications, it’s been an unspectacular but successful half a year, especially for a state whose social experiment has been under local and international media scrutiny since Amendment 64 passed in November of 2012.]]> <![CDATA[Under the influence]]> More than 17 million Americans admit to smoking marijuana, and in 2010 10.6 million Americans reported driving under the influence of an illegal drug, with a high incidence of people age 18 to 25 among the respondents. More than 70 percent of those said they used marijuana before driving.]]> <![CDATA[Buzzed bunnies: The last spurts of ‘Reefer Madness’]]> The headlines were everywhere. “DEA Warns of Stoned Rabbits if Utah Passes Medical Marijuana” was over a story in The Washington Post. A search for “cannabis bunnies Utah” yielded page after page of rewrites of that same tale with variant headlines about small mammals in THC ecstasy. Buzzed bunnies? Washington Post? WTF?]]> <![CDATA[A New Leaf chronicles the demise of prohibition]]> “I’m from upstate New York, and I traveled to California,” Martin said during a recent interview. “I had never been to Venice Beach. I opened the car door and smelled marijuana and asked how they were able to have it. They said it was legal there. It was immediately the kind of federal-state clash that attracted me.]]> <![CDATA[One toke over the bubble machine: Lawrence Welk scores!]]> Finding out that contemporary Nashville musicians are including cannabis in their songwriting got me to thinking about how cannabis made its way into popular songs and culture.]]> <![CDATA[Move over, Ebola: What you should panic about this week]]> Several major news outlets (including Fox and CBS) recently claimed that Colorado-based CB Scientific designed a product for parents to test Halloween candy for marijuana. That’s not accurate, says CB Scientific co-founder Derek Lebahn. His company actually developed these testkits for medical patients and plant breeders. They released them in September. Lebahn contacted a local CBS reporter, but he wasn’t interested.]]> <![CDATA[The Obama drug war budget and the definition of insanity]]> The words were encouraging, especially coming from the surgeon general of the United States. “We have some preliminary data showing that for certain medical conditions and symptoms that marijuana can be helpful.]]> <![CDATA[After a year, it appears that legalization might just work]]> It’s hard to believe that it’s been one full year since retail cannabis shops opened, and two full years that cannabis has been legal in Colorado. So much has happened, but the best news of all is that, all things considered, the experiment seems to be working.]]> <![CDATA[The limits to legislating cannabis edibles]]> The state of Colorado got generally high marks for its initial rollout of recreational cannabis from a Brookings Institute report released last week.]]> <![CDATA[Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 rises from the dead]]> Now, a similar monster is being revived by the Colorado legislature as the Marijuana Tax Act of 2013, now known as Proposition AA.]]> <![CDATA[The THC Fear Factor]]> It was great news to hear that New York has decided to legalize medical cannabis. Well, sort of. After weeks of debate and many compromises, the state will allow doctors to prescribe patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, glaucoma and cancer to use medical cannabis in the form of tinctures, edibles or oil for vaporizers.]]>