<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Adventure]]> <![CDATA[Boulder writer James Dziezynski spills on his summits, secret and otherwise]]> In the early 2000s, Boulder Weekly sent freelance writer James Dziezynski out to research a series of stories on great, little-known places to hike around town.]]> <![CDATA[Outdoor Tech Evolution]]> Film photography seems so quaint in this age of rapidly evolving technology, though the nostalgic charm is somewhat diminished as I flip through photo after photo. There we are, my friends and I, with eyes closed on the summits of mountains or with big fat thumbs obscuring an otherwise stunning sunset.]]> <![CDATA[Paddle through the parks]]> If the nation’s park units represent the heart of our natural legacy, the rivers flowing through them are the central arteries, the life-blood offering nourishment, habitat, shelter, and, of course, geological beginnings. Best yet for us visitors, they offer fun. As Water Rat says famously to Mole in Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind in the Willows: “Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing — absolutely nothing — half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.”]]> <![CDATA[The art of tubing]]> The creek has been a time-honored escape from the heat of summer for decades. And with this year%uFFFDs heat lingering and looking like blasting us in an inferno through September, the creek is the obvious place to go to cool off..]]> <![CDATA[A fighter's chance]]> Colorado native Tate Zandstra has chased martial arts training and reporting as far as Brazil, to study Jiu Jitsu, and Thailand, to study Muay Thai, so it comes as no surprise, really, that when a Burmese maid in Chiang Mai, a city in northern Thailand, started telling him about a Burmese style of boxing, he’d follow that lead wherever it took him.]]> <![CDATA[Steep, deep and cheap at Berthoud Pass]]> One of the great mysteries of Colorado skiing is how a ski area that racked up more snow than anywhere else in the state, was an hour and 15 minutes from downtown Denver and which had some of the steepest terrain in the country managed to go out of business.]]> <![CDATA[Swiss sailing: A bike trip through the Alps, sans Facebook]]> Shunning social media since the beginning of this year has been an interesting experiment, the effects of which are definitely exacerbated by living in the bubble known as Boulder.]]> <![CDATA[Rock, Snow, Water, Ice: Glenwood’s Outdoor Options]]> <![CDATA[Exploring Greenland's Artic trails]]> With just three days of food, we set off to test out the eastern tip of the Arctic Circle Trail, heading west in bright sunshine along a dirt road that parallels the Kangerlussuaq runway. We then turned north — magnetic north, which at this latitude is more than thirty degrees west of true north — to pass through the bustling metropolis of Kellyville. Kellyville has a stated population of seven, and while we were there (we stopped for a picnic lunch on a plank of wood that served as the town bench), the seven residents must have been out of town. Kellyville is a scientific community set up in 1983 to study the ionosphere and upper atmosphere using incoherent scatter radar.]]> <![CDATA[From globetrotting to Boulder Startup Week, Andrew Hyde loves an unusual adventure]]> Andrew Hyde sold almost all of his belongings in 2010 and set out to travel the world with just 15 items. (As long as you’re not persnickety about whether the iPhone and its charger are two different items, he really did it with 15 or so items.)]]> <![CDATA[Petitioning the Overseers]]> For most river runners in the West, the middle of February is the real start of the whitewater season, a kind of college acceptance-letter week. While all of the great multi-day river trips through the canyons of the Colorado Plateau are regulated by the fickle swoons of weather and snowpack from year to year, most of them are also governed by the U.]]> <![CDATA[‘New Alpinism’ promotes cross training regimen for climbing success]]> Steve House was seeking a better way to train after he was forced to turn back during his attempt at Pakistan’s Masherbrum, a 25,659-foot peak, in 2003. He’d had overtrained for the climb, according to Scott Johnston, who stepped in to provide some advice.]]> <![CDATA[Continental drift]]> Somewhere over the more than two years of interviews that went into making 5 Races 5, Continents, which tracks toward the emotional core of trail running, the conversation among the filmmakers and one of their central subjects, Killian Jornet, turned to the growing popularity of the sport.]]> <![CDATA[Still running: Documentary retells history of women’s marathon record-setter]]> After the 50-year-old Joan Benoit Samuelson ran a sub-2:50 marathon in the 2008 Olympic Trials, she announced that she was “retiring.” However, a former Olympic champion still logging more than 50 miles each week does not simply stop running.]]> <![CDATA[In the shadow of Denali]]> In 1967, a joint team of climbers from Colorado and Seattle embarked on a mission to scale the highest point on the continent: 20,323-foot Mount McKinley (also known by its native name Denali). Of the 12 men who set out on the arduous trek to the fabled summit, only five returned alive.]]> <![CDATA[Far from tapping out]]> Carrie Barry worked for years to be the first American female boxer at the Olympics. It didnīt happen. Hereīs how she bounced back.]]> <![CDATA[Author J. Grigsby Crawford's 'The Gringo' takes a raw look at Peace Corps]]> Only a few weeks into a two-year Peace Corps program, Boulder native J. Grigsby Crawford received a text from his host that read, “Turn off your light and go to sleep. It’s very important that you stay quiet and don’t leave your room.” Outside the house were men in ski masks with guns. They wanted to kidnap Crawford.]]> <![CDATA[Gliding over Ghana]]> It’s a lot like that dream you had as a kid — the dream where you could fly. “I used to love that dream and was always disappointed when I woke up and couldn’t fly,” says Tim Meehan, a freelance digital designer and tandem paraglider pilot based in Boulder.]]> <![CDATA[Protect your iPhone from the elements]]> <![CDATA[Navigating Nepal]]> Luke Mislinski had been in Nepal for a month by the time he met two of his friends in Kathmandu. The three Americans were milling about the intricate temples and fountains of Durbar Square in the country’s capitol when a Nepali man approached the group, offering a tour of the historic site for around 200 Nepali rupees per person — less than $2 each.]]>