<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Adventure]]> <![CDATA[Six feet and the smell of victory]]> Burro racing probably won’t be coming to prime time on ESPN soon, but that doesn’t mean that the sport isn’t alive and well in Colorado. ]]> <![CDATA[Simple singletrack]]> There’s no doubt that there’s plenty of fantastic mountain biking surrounding Boulder. This is true despite occasional grumbling by the singletrack set. Sure, mountain bikers won’t get to taste the charms of the Mesa Trail anytime soon, but once you’ve tired of riding Walker Ranch or Marshall Mesa, instead of grumbling about lack of access, put some energy into something better: planning a road trip to some of the amazingly varied and high-quality riding that lurks within a day’s drive of the Boulder Bubble.]]> <![CDATA[Powder, paranormal and more: The underrated adventure sports mecca of Glenwood Springs]]> There were ghosts, they told us. Strange bumps and sounds in the night. Lights that turned on and off for no apparent reason. Doors that slammed shut, suddenly and without warning. Things that kept you up at night. We thought about it and then climbed into the deep softness of our bed.]]> <![CDATA[History re-made]]> At 27,000 feet, Amelia Rose Earhart was soaring over Howland Island, the intended destination of legendary aviatrix Amelia Earhart, when she used a small handheld GPS device to tweet the names of the young women who were set to receive flight-training scholarships from her own aviation non-profit organization, the Fly With Amelia Foundation.]]> <![CDATA[Professional at a higher level]]> Waters talks about this season’s challenge with the familiarity and perspective of a pro walking off the links at the Masters. He’s not priming a fairway shot or reading the green, but his view shares the absorption of technical details and evaluation of risk often seen with toptier performers in their field.]]> <![CDATA[Pro Mountain Biker Kelli Emmett at home on the trails]]> It's a surface that has played a substantial role in her life. She spent a good chunk of her childhood laboring on the family's apple farm in Plymouth, Mich. When she wasn't mowing fields, picking apples or pruning her share of the orchard's 15,000 trees, odds were good she was turning laps on an old dirt bike.]]> <![CDATA[Schooled in snow]]> The state is known as “Ski Country USA.” It’s a place of rugged peaks, high mountains and snowy winters. So, if you’re a skier looking for a place to get educated, it’s no surprise that going to an institute of higher education in the Centennial state might be high on your list.]]> <![CDATA[Dancer in the wild]]> High up on the southern side of Bear Peak at the southwestern edge of Boulder, the rock feature known as The Maiden hooks from the ground toward the western horizon. The west, overhanging face became the stage for an unlikely aerial play — a solo aerial dancer.]]> <![CDATA[Chronicles of pain and passion]]> “The two of us have never done a bike tour and we thought it would be pretty cool to do a bike tour, we’re pretty good friends, we’ve traveled a lot, and, you know, it’s all culminated in the worst trip of our lives,” Honnold says in the film trailer.]]> <![CDATA[These teardrop trailers will make you smile]]> Having purchased a set of plans, he rented a cramped, dingy storeroom off Pearl Street and set about fabricating his own trailer, but he quickly found he needed an extra set of hands. His thoughts turned to David.]]> <![CDATA[How I Nearly Killed My Father on Tenaya Canyon]]> The sign read, “Tenaya Canyon is extremely dangerous. Many have lost their lives in the attempt.” Thus warned, my 78-year-old dad was set to hike and rappel through it. And I had agreed to join him.]]> <![CDATA[Adapting the backcountry]]> Most everyone who’s snapped on a pair of skis has, at one point or another, found themselves staring down some steep, snow-laden hill, wondering how the hell they’re going to get down it. Now, imagine being at the top of that same hill, only you don’t have a pair of skis, you only have one.]]> <![CDATA[Tall tales]]> Not every journey ends in an exclamation point. When Matt Segal, Eric Decaria and John Dickey went to Kyrgyzstan to climb its massive, granite walls, they didn’t go to set up a new route or pioneer a new area. But they took video cameras anyway, and filmed what they did do.]]> <![CDATA[The bicultural advantage]]> Years ago, I was eating at McDonald’s in a Florence, Italy, train station when I spotted three tall men in American football jerseys. I was glad to see some compatriots, so I went over and struck up a conversation.]]> <![CDATA[It’s not about the shoes]]> Running. The elemental act of putting one foot in front of the other: rhythmic, effortless motion when it’s done right, grueling and difficult at times and — though this fact is lost to history — probably the first sport that humans ever competed against each other in.]]> <![CDATA[Open doors, open eyes and change lives]]> Thirty minutes outside New York City, on the road to the Shawangunk Mountains in upstate New York, Anthony DeJesus turned to his travel companions and said this was the farthest he’d ever been outside the city. Born and raised in the Bronx, he’d joined a gang as a teenager and been incarcerated for dealing drugs by his 20th birthday. His outlook on life was as narrow as the space between the buildings and pavement that surrounded him.]]> <![CDATA[Reaching higher]]> Are rock climbers the future of the conservation movement? Brady Robinson, executive director of the Boulder-based Access Fund, thinks so. “At the very beginning, we were motivated by access threats, by our access [to climbing areas] being restricted,” Robinson says of his organization. “In my view, to do a good job with access, you have to do a good job with conservation. If the place isn’t taken care of, what good is it to have access to it?”]]> <![CDATA[The road]]> Walk Japan’s 11-day Nakasendo Way tour will guide my group along the route of an ancient and largely forgotten highway. Dating back to the 7th century, Japan’s Nakasendo was a path for shoguns, pilgrims and samurai — not to mention average travelers like we are — who wore out pair after pair of straw sandals on the rolling terrain.]]> <![CDATA[Living the dream]]> For photographers, as for anglers, there’s always that one that got away. Rock climbing guide turned professional photographer and filmmaker Celin Serbo remembers such a shot vividly. It took place years ago on a guiding expedition to Ecuador. He was belaying clients up a headwall on the Cayambe volcano. It was early morning and the sun was just beginning to rise.]]> <![CDATA[Rock, Snow, Water, Ice: Glenwood’s Outdoor Options]]>