<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Adventure]]> <![CDATA[The Abetone advantage]]> The warm scents of the Mediterranean followed us as we turned inland from Italy’s Mediterranean coast and headed toward the mountains. We could see through the early spring haze that there was snow up there; an unlikely rumor from under the palms that dotted the promenades of the coastal fishing villages.]]> <![CDATA[A world running for a chance to walk again]]> University of Colorado graduate Thomas Cloyd has gone through painstaking changes in his life, both physically and mentally, after a spinal cord injury left him in a wheelchair. The May 4 World Run in Denver, a race organized to raise money for a cure for spinal cord injuries, has prompted Cloyd’s return to his former stomping grounds to do his part to get himself and so many others back on their feet.]]> <![CDATA[These teardrop trailers will make you smile]]> Having purchased a set of plans, he rented a cramped, dingy storeroom off Pearl Street and set about fabricating his own trailer, but he quickly found he needed an extra set of hands. His thoughts turned to David.]]> <![CDATA[Traveling with more than good intentions]]> On a visit back to his native country, on a trek in the Annapurna region of Nepal, Portland State University professor Bishupal Limbu remembers being uncomfortable because of his shoes. They were nice, they were meant for the occasion and the Australians he was trekking with had on similarly fancy boots.]]> <![CDATA[Depth of anatomy]]> The cadaver is far smaller than I expected. It rests wrapped in green towels, face up on a silver table in a small, uncluttered space. Small incisions separate the skin from the subcutaneous tissue, exposing a yellowish, fatty layer protecting the muscle wall.]]> <![CDATA[Carbon-offset commuting]]> I love to ski. I’m concerned about climate change. And I have an old car with nearly 200,000 miles on it. What do these three things have in common? Not much — except that they are all related to a goal I set in March to commute by bike this summer the equivalent number of miles that I drove to go skiing last winter.]]> <![CDATA[SeaWorld sinks deeper]]> Eighth-grade field trips are not usually a cause of ethical dilemmas. But this year at Alexander Dawson School in Lafayette, the itinerary was questioned by 13-year-old student Phoebe Goldstein. Every spring the school offers a variety of educational trips to both domestic and international destinations.]]> <![CDATA[All grown up]]> And this year the little town of Ouray in southwestern Colorado is going to be throwing a pretty big party. The town, which hosts their annual Ouray Ice Festival from Jan. 8 to Jan. 11, is celebrating two decades on the ice.]]> <![CDATA[Peeking at an ancient civilization]]> It rains for the first time this summer in Athens during my stay. A welcome plummet to the brooding temperatures. The days are humid and seemingly eternal. The sea swells in ridiculous blues and greens. Whole towns converge to swim. Cicadas hum vacuously in the sultry air.]]> <![CDATA[Adventure]]> <![CDATA[BRIEF]]> <![CDATA[RISKY BUSINESS]]> Markus Beck describes himself as a “risk manager,” and if you glanced at his resume, it’s clear he manages plenty of it. As an avalanche safety instructor and the owner of a mountain guide service, risk is often the one thing Beck can’t avoid. His company, the Boulder-based Alpine World Ascents, has, in many ways, made risk into a business — or rather, the mitigation of risk. But with the U.S. Forest Service limiting the number of active permits allowed on forest lands, teaching other people how to manage risks in the backcountry might just be the part of his business he has to bury. ]]> <![CDATA[‘Drawn’ to create new lines]]> What would you do, if you were a 30-something parent with a career and a mortgage, and still felt the call of the wilderness, not just for weekend camping trips and days at the local crag sport climbing, but to venture into the unknown, to climb...]]> <![CDATA[briefs]]> <![CDATA[Dressed for success]]> Nicole DeBoom was watching the Ironman Triathlon World Championship in 1982 as Julie Moss entered her final mile of the race with a comfortable lead and her body began to give up. Moss collapsed and got back up several times until she couldn’t stand, and then she crawled to the finish line.]]> <![CDATA[Beware of tree wells]]> <![CDATA[A fighter's chance]]> Colorado native Tate Zandstra has chased martial arts training and reporting as far as Brazil, to study Jiu Jitsu, and Thailand, to study Muay Thai, so it comes as no surprise, really, that when a Burmese maid in Chiang Mai, a city in northern Thailand, started telling him about a Burmese style of boxing, he’d follow that lead wherever it took him.]]> <![CDATA[Savvy skiers know to look for ticket deals now]]> <![CDATA[Knock on wood]]> Wood One of the most basic building materials known to humans, wood is the foundation of skis and snowboards. This versatile, beautiful material was used for the first skis. The legendary Austrian pioneer of downhill skiing, Arnold Lund, perfected the first alpine turns with skis made of wood.]]> <![CDATA[Undeniable Denali]]> He looked bizarre, totally out of place, this Pakistani climber in ragged, old mountaineering clothes, alone, shaking our tent while we tried to sleep, asking frantically for a satellite phone,” says University of Colorado alum and Denver-based mountaineer Alex Harz, recounting a night high on a flank of North America’s tallest peak, Denali.]]>