<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Restaurant Review]]> <![CDATA[Classic breakfast, without the rush]]> Jeff, an East Coast native, immediately sensed a comforting familiarity about the cafes we stepped inside, noting it possessed the homey ambiance of a Vermont or New Hampshire roadside eatery. Indeed, the sunny yellow walls, farmhouse furniture, and brightly colored original artwork seemed a universe away from his neon-illuminated world of $12.]]> <![CDATA[Baked on a budget]]> The bratwurst special ($9.95) this reporter ordered had a strong, smoky flavor and a pleasantly firm texture for a brat. My server said that the sausages are currently made by friends of the owner, but that it is their ultimate goal to make them in-house.]]> <![CDATA[Chinese-American standbys]]> I’ve finally taken a “If you can’t beat, join ‘em” tack to my critical assessment of local Chinese restaurants. No longer do I hold Boulder eateries to the same standard of the Bay Area joints of my youth. Why? Because for the most part, establishments around here are not, strictly speaking, Chinese restaurants.]]> <![CDATA[Over the forest, through the woods]]> Winding up snowy Coal Creek Canyon on the winter solstice, I’m gripping the wheel like my Dad in traffic on Christmas Eve trying to get to my grandparents’ house before he implodes.]]> <![CDATA[Tiffins, tiffins, tiffins a to-go bag]]> When Tiffin’s opened two years ago, its focus was solely on vegetarian food common in southern India. This year, they’ve expanded their menu by also offering meat and, notably, some new northern Indian dishes.]]> <![CDATA[Make a mess at Ras Kassa’s]]> Their motto is “Eat like you’ve never heard of silverware,” and they aren’t kidding. Everything from farmer’s cheese to lentil stew is served with spongy Ethiopian bread called injera to be used for scooping, and nothing else.]]> <![CDATA[If it ain’t broke]]> In many ways, Boulder’s restaurant culture, with its focus on local, organic and high-quality ingredients and preparation, serves as a model for what the rest of the country could be doing to help Americans eat better.]]> <![CDATA[An overdone riff]]> The word “riff” implies improvisation and excitement. It instantly brings to mind a memorable guitar solo, and applied to food, the expectation for something inspiring. Unfortunately, in the case of Riffs Urban Fare, there is such a thing as too much riffing.]]> <![CDATA[Lauding Laudisio]]> <![CDATA[The secret]]> Not because the food isn’t fantastic, but because while most Boulder restaurants are clustered in one of the city’s two walking neighborhoods, or in major-roadway stripmalls you could easily wander into, Dagabi Cucina is tucked away in the back spot...]]> <![CDATA[Happy Mateo hour]]> The bar menu here is comprehensive, with selections ranging from light to the truly substantial. There’s a sirloin burger for $8, marked down from $11 and topped with caramelized onions. Also available is a $7 house-cut tagliatelle pasta adorned by mushrooms, herbs and cream.]]> <![CDATA[A fresh spin on the taste of Mexico]]> Antonio’s, subtitled A Taste of Mexico, is a new addition to Longmont’s Main Street dining scene. Ambience here is upscale, with contemporary Southwestern art and dark woods, creating a sense of elegant intimacy. Yet Antonio’s is still the kind of welcoming spot that features a children’s menu and prices more reasonable than the trappings would indicate.]]> <![CDATA[Thai a noodle on]]> Prices here are quite reasonable, as lunch or dinner should be well below 10 dollars a person. At-the-counter ordering and service help keep things inexpensive, as does the simple but colorful d%u98EFr, reminiscent of a high-end nursery school.]]> <![CDATA[Farm to fast food]]> The Colorado chain has been slinging spinach since 2004, steadily growing from a single saladteria in Denver to a dozen locations statewide, with company owners saying they are looking to open as many as 50 more outlets in the next five years. MAD Greens may not be winning friends by The Simpsons’.]]> <![CDATA[The Boulder Cork has aged well]]> Settings into a venerable locale such as the Boulder Cork restaurant, one can’t but help wonder if the dapper sports coat-clad gentleman at the next table might be a regular who’s come here for decades. Perhaps a younger version of him showed up here in the ’70s, decked out in a turtleneck, bell-bottoms and a sweet Mark Spitz-style ’stache. He’s aged reasonably well, but what about his favored restaurant?]]> <![CDATA[Fettuccine a la ESPN]]> It was a line of thought that was hard to ignore at Carelli’s, a generally pleasant sit-down on the corner of 30th and Baseline in Boulder, where the ambiance included a jazz band playing in the corner, soft lights rotating colors above the bar and a faceful of the Little League World Series making error after error after error.]]> <![CDATA[McFoodies]]> Regardless of whether you’re on Team Offal, Team Slow Food or Team Molecular Gastronomy, a consistent theme in modern culinary thought is the idea of rejecting an industrialized food system, either to maximize the variety of experience, source effectively, or have an intimate knowledge of what you are eating in order to better hack your metabolism.]]> <![CDATA[Temperature matters]]> The best fish and chips I ever had were at some wharf-side shack on Granville Island in Vancouver. Hands numb and cramped under a space heater, wet from it being Vancouver in November, and tired from a long, lost walk… temperature mattered. A crispy, thick shell held in steaming halibut, and all was in balance.]]> <![CDATA[The frontier]]> Boulder’s strict growth boundaries make heading north on Broadway a bit of a cliffdrop, with the city ending abruptly as the street y’s into U.S. 36. But nestled right up against the edge is a restaurant that would be as at home in the urban core as it is on the fringes: The North End at 4580.]]> <![CDATA[How to mingle]]> The reuben was pleasant; nothing overbearing in it, nothing too quiet. The bread was undertoasted and it was short on rye, but it held up remarkably well given a healthy amount of cole slaw (which replaced the traditional sauerkraut) and Thousand Island dressing.]]>