<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Restaurant Review]]> <![CDATA[An authentic Chicago dog, hold the ketchup]]> The finer points of the Chicago-style hot dog have always been a bit cryptic for me.]]> <![CDATA[Hiding in plain sight]]> Whether you like it or not, there is a perception outside of Colorado that steakhouses abound in this state. The assumption is that cattle farms abound out here, and that meat from top Angus and Kobe beef farms throughout the West is shipped to a bevy of hungry consumers at any number of steakhouses along the Front Range.]]> <![CDATA[Looking good]]> It was the store that launched a thousand fashion blogs. Seemed that way, at least. Anthropologie. A women’s clothing store that taps into the area between fashion school and art school, selling unique clothing and lifestyle doo-dads.]]> <![CDATA[Temperature matters]]> The best fish and chips I ever had were at some wharf-side shack on Granville Island in Vancouver. Hands numb and cramped under a space heater, wet from it being Vancouver in November, and tired from a long, lost walk… temperature mattered. A crispy, thick shell held in steaming halibut, and all was in balance.]]> <![CDATA[If it ain’t broke]]> In many ways, Boulder’s restaurant culture, with its focus on local, organic and high-quality ingredients and preparation, serves as a model for what the rest of the country could be doing to help Americans eat better.]]> <![CDATA[George's Food & Drink hauntingly delicious]]> George’s Food & Drink, adjoining the Boulder Theater, is named for the unfortunate George Paper who perished in the theater decades ago. Supposedly the victim of an accidental hanging, he’s a restless soul said to still roam the building, a wispy shape in a drape. Others hold him responsible for the mysterious disappearance of several light bulbs. Apparently George likes it dark. George’s Food & Drink 2028 14th St., Boulder 303-998-9350]]> <![CDATA[Basta’s brunch among the best]]> Once known as Pizzeria Basta, the Boulder eatery now simply known as Basta still serves savory wood oven pies. But this name change more accurately reflects a menu offering much more than just pizza, which is a smart move.]]> <![CDATA[Double vision]]> Unsurprisingly, the Asian fusion restaurant was all about combinations. But not in the way one might expect. Indeed, expectations for Bao Asian Fusion in Louisville were sort of blurry. The building is a big beige block on a busy intersection, flanked by a closed-down Chili’s and an Outback Steakhouse, that you have to drive through a McDonald’s parking lot to get to.]]> <![CDATA[The secret]]> Not because the food isn’t fantastic, but because while most Boulder restaurants are clustered in one of the city’s two walking neighborhoods, or in major-roadway stripmalls you could easily wander into, Dagabi Cucina is tucked away in the back spot...]]> <![CDATA[Everyone is happy]]> Everyone is happy at The Post. On a Friday afternoon, three cooks are laughing behind the bakery counter. When I return a week later, three new cooks — or who knows — are laughing again. The waiters, too, are all happy. Not the giddy, storemandated affability that drives you nuts. Just the calm joy of a person who’s happy to be at work. Happiness inhabits the place, an old VFW that was chicly remodeled and restored into a post-industrial lodge. It keeps smiles on the faces of the folks who have to wait tables and the folks who have to wait for tables.]]> <![CDATA[Barbecue-topia at KT’s Hickory Pit]]> There are four KT’s locations. The East Boulder spot I visited is a converted house on 74th and Arapahoe, decorated with Elvis memorabilia, including a copy of the only cookbook this reporter owns hanging on the wall, Are You Hungry Tonight?: Elvis’s Favorite Recipes.]]> <![CDATA[Roadside romance]]> When I went to school in Los Angeles, nearly a third of my meals were eaten at Cactus Taqueria, a tiny orange shack outside my apartment near Vine and Melrose. It had enough exhaust from passing traffic to function as a smokehouse, no shade, no seating, no bathroom, no ambiance and little else amenity-wise.]]> <![CDATA[Crazy flavor]]> There is no shame in the occasional indulgence. As long as your actions don’t hurt anybody and you don’t cross the invisible line of no return, joy becomes you during the indulgence of booze, pizza, burritos, fried food and ice cream. Especially ice cream. And especially the ice cream at Sweet Cow.]]> <![CDATA[Shine on]]> When I first heard the name of Boulder’s new eatery Shine, I was hoping it would feature entertainment by a troubled pianist portrayed by actor Geoffrey Rush. Alas, Shine appears more to refer to notions of maximized self-actualization than David Helfgott, although music is on the menu. The latest venture from the Emich triplets, this gathering space, bar and restaurant is just a few doors down from their former establishment, Trilogy.]]> <![CDATA[Latin health food]]> Most dishes here are South American, with a particular focus on Venezuela and Colombia. Arepa, a cornmeal cake stuffed with a variety of fillings, is a signature offering here. There's also bean and rice bowls served with salsa and smooth Venezuelan guacamole, as well as fried yucca root appetizers.]]> <![CDATA[Solid, simple sushi in Superior]]> It recently dawned on me that location doesn’t seem to be a predictor of the quality of Boulder County Japanese restaurants. Sure, I’ve had fine Asian meals at the high-end downtown Boulder stalwarts. But I’ve also enjoyed equally satisfying repasts in strip mall joints and haunts tucked away in the corners of grocery stores.]]> <![CDATA[An escape to Paris]]> I thought Chef Radek Czerny’s L’Atelier, deeply influenced by classic French cuisine, would satisfy this hunger. The ambience here combines elements of the old and the new, melding retro Hummel figurines with an elegant yet modern palette of understated but not drab colors. As always, the service is among the most professionally rendered in town, and during a recent lunch visit, patrons were decidedly quieter than the livelier dinnertime clientele.]]> <![CDATA[Boulder lands Cuban sandwich outpost]]> Cuba Cuba has a new Boulder outpost, the affordably priced Cuba Cuba Sandwicheria. One suspects this quick-serve venture has franchising ambitions, as the first impression of the general setup is that it’s like Chipotle with a better color scheme. But this eatery also distinguishes itself with a lively Cuban soundtrack and surprisingly pleasant shaded outside tables.]]> <![CDATA[Café makes Eggcredible pierogi dumplings]]> Nestled inside the Days Hotel (formerly Inn) off South Boulder Road, Boulder’s Eggcredible Café, which serves only breakfast and lunch, features a cozy log cabin interior suggesting wide open Western spaces.]]> <![CDATA[Can’t complain]]> As applied to restaurants no less than to novels or films, the adjective “critic-proof ” is usually a backhanded compliment, acknowledging the consumer savvy rather than the craftsmanship of the producer in question.]]>