<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Restaurant Review]]> <![CDATA[A laudable weekend brunch]]> Sunday morning was rough. I had injured my knee the day before, resulting in an ER visit and an unsure prognosis. My friend Ann suggested an ameliorative brunch, and I was game, but not necessarily up for one of those popular joints with a long wait and hip vibe.]]> <![CDATA[Classic Italian in Lafayette]]> As someone with too much time on my hands, I've recently been preoccupied with seeking out classic, if not downright iconic, meals. These repasts don't necessarily have to be pricey or complex, and can be as simple as a grilled cheese accompanied by tomato soup.]]> <![CDATA[Peep this]]> It would be a lie to call Le Peep “Boulder’s best kept secret.” For one, the diner is a chain with dozens of locations, and it’s been in Boulder for 30 years or so. The chain has been around even longer. Then there’s the fact that it’s got a reasonable level of bustle in a central location.]]> <![CDATA[Revisiting a revamped classic]]> In some ways the Chautauqua Dining Hall might be to Boulderites what the Statue of Liberty might be to New Yorkers. Sure, you know it’s there, but you may not venture out there that much unless you have out-of-town visitors or are obligated to attend a special event.]]> <![CDATA[Tracking down perfection]]> You have to appreciate the moxie of a restaurant that is open until it sells out. Especially when you set up shop at the end of an empty parking lot, triangulated by Buffalo Wild Wings, PetSmart and Super Target, in the perpetually under construction, unglamorous superdevelopment of Superior.]]> <![CDATA[A reasonably priced lunch at a high-end place]]> My first job out of college was working for the U.S. Forest Service in Rutland, Vt. Unfortunately, lunch choices in this town were limited, and I ate most meals at the family-run Sandwich Shoppe. Pricing was in line with my entry-level salary — today, you can still get a big meatball sub there for $6.]]> <![CDATA[The water’s fine]]> One thing every diner needs in their toolkit is good, simple Asian food. Not simple in the sense that it’s of poor quality, but simple in the sense that it isn’t decorated to death, to the point of terminal tackiness. Just something approachably tasteful, and tasty.]]> <![CDATA[Barbecue-topia at KT’s Hickory Pit]]> There are four KT’s locations. The East Boulder spot I visited is a converted house on 74th and Arapahoe, decorated with Elvis memorabilia, including a copy of the only cookbook this reporter owns hanging on the wall, Are You Hungry Tonight?: Elvis’s Favorite Recipes.]]> <![CDATA[Cup at Conor’s]]> Unfortunately, pretty much everything I know about World Cup soccer comes from the mid-’90s pinball machine of the same name. I know that teams from around the world are involved and someone enthusiastically yells out “goal” in an elongated manner whenever points are scored.]]> <![CDATA[Getting dizzy on Boulder’s newest donuts]]> I fed Mara donuts until she wept. Well, not really, although we certainly did a fine job of indulging ourselves at Dizzy’s Donuts, Boulder’s newest venue serving fresh takes on old-school baked goods.]]> <![CDATA[That’ll work]]> This food was made for beer. So it’s a good thing the beer at Pumphouse Brewery in Longmont is both tasty and plentiful. Otherwise who knows if this bustling restaurant, with an attached bar called Red Zone, would be so bustling. That is to say, most diners in touch with reality and their own pretention, give a pass to fast casual bar and grills on the quality of the meals that accompany the beer, so long as the food is fresh and filling.]]> <![CDATA[Basta’s brunch among the best]]> Once known as Pizzeria Basta, the Boulder eatery now simply known as Basta still serves savory wood oven pies. But this name change more accurately reflects a menu offering much more than just pizza, which is a smart move.]]> <![CDATA[Here’s the twist]]> There’s a surprising amount of room onboard Louise. Chef Michael DeBoer and his wife Lori bought the old and deteriorating truck, which had lived a life as the famed Cheese Louise mobile restaurant. It died of having a hole in the floor underneath the driver’s seat, and truck-grade osteoporosis, which caused its support beams to rust to dust. ]]> <![CDATA[Top-notch sushi in an unassuming spot]]> Given the sushi expertise present, I chose to ignore such offerings as the Saturday shoyu or miso broth ramen lunch special and various bento boxes. Instead I focused on sushi specials, and my opening gambit was a $12 white fish lovers’ special.]]> <![CDATA[Chinese-American standbys]]> I’ve finally taken a “If you can’t beat, join ‘em” tack to my critical assessment of local Chinese restaurants. No longer do I hold Boulder eateries to the same standard of the Bay Area joints of my youth. Why? Because for the most part, establishments around here are not, strictly speaking, Chinese restaurants.]]> <![CDATA[Rain or shine]]> The Hungry Toad was built for rainy days. It makes for a cozy pint when you can sit in the corner and watch the wind beat rain into the windows with wooden jambs. The fixtures are natural, from the exposed brick wall to the leather bar chairs to the wooden tabletops. The Hungry Toad is a warm blanket, a leather couch and a Saturday with Netflix.]]> <![CDATA[Simply satisfying]]> Perhaps nowhere else in Boulder County is food tied to a place as much as Tibet’s Restaurant & Bar in Louisville is to the country and perspective of its namesake. The interior is designed with care and intention. The owners Mark Herman, and Kami and Pasang Sherpa, the latter two of whom are from Nepal, have carefully placed artifacts throughout the restaurant to effect calm and pleasure. “Each decoration,” the owners write, “serves as a reminder of Buddhist philosophy. … Tibet’s has been decorated with strategically placed items to create the best energy for the space.”]]> <![CDATA[A special place]]> It’s prime rib night at the tavern. There’s a happy murmur in the dining room, likely because it’s the kind of place where you can get a fat prime rib and baked potato for ten bucks on a Monday night. The prime rib special is about community. I have driven into the night on some interstate countless times, headed for some easy weekend retreat, and popped into an Al’s or a Roadside or a Moonlight, finding a cheerful community, switching booths, chatting up neighbors and laughing at playful waitress sass.]]> <![CDATA[Eating local]]> When you travel, one of the first things you tell folks about your trip is how the food was. It’s just a simple way to engage your conversation partners in a talk about your trip, which we care about but don’t really want to hear about, and give them something to latch onto.]]> <![CDATA[Making culinary connections]]> The Culinary Connectors concept is simple — up to 10 diners pay $99 to tour three restaurants in an afternoon, with each stop lasting approximately one hour. Each visit affords an opportunity to sample menu and wine highlights, as well as converse with chefs.]]>