<![CDATA[Boulder - Weekly - Restaurant Review]]> <![CDATA[A hut with potential]]> In reality, Elephant Hut is a swank Thai eatery, serving obligatory staples of Southeast Asian cuisine such as curries, entr饠salads freighted with fresh papaya, noodle plates and spicy, citrusy soups.]]> <![CDATA[A special place]]> It’s prime rib night at the tavern. There’s a happy murmur in the dining room, likely because it’s the kind of place where you can get a fat prime rib and baked potato for ten bucks on a Monday night. The prime rib special is about community. I have driven into the night on some interstate countless times, headed for some easy weekend retreat, and popped into an Al’s or a Roadside or a Moonlight, finding a cheerful community, switching booths, chatting up neighbors and laughing at playful waitress sass.]]> <![CDATA[Go west for summer cookout fare]]> First up was the Tavern’s $6 take on deviled, or as they call them, picnic, eggs, a selection my inner Cool Hand Luke found appealing. The West End’s presentation consisted of a half-dozen jumbo oeuvres, subtly spiced with turmeric, although they also suffered from too much salt. The yolks featured silky smooth texture, and appeared to have been piped through a pastry bag. Whites had a touch of give, and none of the rubberiness associated with overcooking.]]> <![CDATA[Can’t complain]]> As applied to restaurants no less than to novels or films, the adjective “critic-proof ” is usually a backhanded compliment, acknowledging the consumer savvy rather than the craftsmanship of the producer in question.]]> <![CDATA[Surprising seafood]]> It took a while to find Café Blue in Gunbarrel. It’s hidden in a strip mall, which is in the shadow of another, bigger strip mall, which is in the shadow of a King Soopers… part of a larger strip mall. But inside those doors is a quaint, friendly cafe that serves a variety of lunch and dinner options and has a homey bar set right in the middle of the dining room.]]> <![CDATA[George's Food & Drink hauntingly delicious]]> George’s Food & Drink, adjoining the Boulder Theater, is named for the unfortunate George Paper who perished in the theater decades ago. Supposedly the victim of an accidental hanging, he’s a restless soul said to still roam the building, a wispy shape in a drape. Others hold him responsible for the mysterious disappearance of several light bulbs. Apparently George likes it dark. George’s Food & Drink 2028 14th St., Boulder 303-998-9350]]> <![CDATA[Getting dizzy on Boulder’s newest donuts]]> I fed Mara donuts until she wept. Well, not really, although we certainly did a fine job of indulging ourselves at Dizzy’s Donuts, Boulder’s newest venue serving fresh takes on old-school baked goods.]]> <![CDATA[A platter by any other name…]]> Having never eaten a Pu Pu platter on a boat or with a goat I thought it was high time I sampled this classic Chinese-American appetizer assortment. You see, when I went to Chinese restaurants with my folks, things like braised chicken feet were far more likely to appear on the menu than this Americanized appetizer platter.]]> <![CDATA[Simply satisfying]]> Perhaps nowhere else in Boulder County is food tied to a place as much as Tibet’s Restaurant & Bar in Louisville is to the country and perspective of its namesake. The interior is designed with care and intention. The owners Mark Herman, and Kami and Pasang Sherpa, the latter two of whom are from Nepal, have carefully placed artifacts throughout the restaurant to effect calm and pleasure. “Each decoration,” the owners write, “serves as a reminder of Buddhist philosophy. … Tibet’s has been decorated with strategically placed items to create the best energy for the space.”]]> <![CDATA[Culinary ambition in north Boulder]]> At both lunch and dinner, the menu is divided into small plates, soups, salads, burgers and entrees. Entrees range from house-made pasta with red sauce to formidable duck confit cassoulet. Consigliere Keith and I sought out a hearty lunch to kick off the work week, and 4580's offerings appeared to be positioned to satisfy our needs.]]> <![CDATA[Chicken a la antlers]]> The Sunday brunch menu has a few crossover items from the chicken-centric dinner menu, but focuses more on traditional breakfast items like roast beef hash ($11) and a delicious-sounding egg-battered slab of Texas toast dressed up in bourbon apples ($9).]]> <![CDATA[Revisiting a revamped classic]]> In some ways the Chautauqua Dining Hall might be to Boulderites what the Statue of Liberty might be to New Yorkers. Sure, you know it’s there, but you may not venture out there that much unless you have out-of-town visitors or are obligated to attend a special event.]]> <![CDATA[Indian street food in Lafayette]]> Chaat is savory Indian street food, and it’s also something that has become increasingly available at local eateries like Boulder’s Jai Ho and Tiffins. Lafayette’s Krishna Kafe is the newest purveyor of these subcontinental specialties.]]> <![CDATA[South of the border but a cut above]]> Agave’s interior wears its aspirations on its sleeve. A beautiful brass-toned fireplace is the understated centerpiece of the contemporary main dining room — no kitschy strings of chile pepper lights here.]]> <![CDATA[Cheaper than a plane ticket to Japan]]> From the owner of Sushi Zanmai comes an interpretation of upscale Japanese cuisine. Don’t expect to get away with your American version of Japanese dining: There are no California rolls or edamame — and you have to take your shoes off. It’s only polite.]]> <![CDATA[Burgers and shakes with style]]> I used to mess with my friend Andrew by feeding him false reports that a popular burger and milkshake chain had set up shop in Colorado. As it turns out, that chain now does have a Denver-area outpost, but it’s far enough away to require advanced planning, and who wants to deal with that?]]> <![CDATA[Affordable excellence]]> My pizza artist rolled and brushed the dough, slapped my dream team on top and threw it in the oven to bake. The final product ended up with roasted Brussels sprouts, prosciutto, mushrooms, caramelized onions, peppers and red sauce on top of the fresh-baked and tasty thin-style crust.]]> <![CDATA[Alice's retro diner charm]]> It's too cold for a fair-weather cyclist to ride, and there's not enough snow to go skiing. So what to do? In the run-up to the hectic holidays, a leisurely weekend breakfast sounded like just the ticket. So I decided to explore Longmont's Aunt Alice's Kitchen.]]> <![CDATA[A taste of Britain in Broomfield]]> Broomfield`s Wildflowers Restaurant is located off the beaten path in the Hilltop Inn, a guest house situated a stone’s throw from the airport. Inside, you’ll feel you’ve been transported to a homey British inn. Sure, the traditional antique furnishings and old school fare may not be everybody’s cup of tea, but for expats or home-cooked meal aficionados, this venue delivers. ]]> <![CDATA[A distinctive Indian lunch buffet]]> For those old enough, you may remember 1985 as a dark time, mostly because that’s when McDonald’s launched the McDLT. In today’s recycling-conscious age, the McDLT probably wouldn’t exist. For those of you unfamiliar with this environmental atrocity, this was a burger adorned with lettuce and tomato that came in a double-chambered Styrofoam container.]]>